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Hugo C. M. Costa

Hugo C. M. Costa
Instituto Juruá

PhD candidate

About

31
Publications
8,335
Reads
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222
Citations
Citations since 2017
28 Research Items
199 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Additional affiliations
March 2017 - present
Uesc
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
The Amazon is one of the most diverse biomes around the globe, currently threatened by economic and industrial development and climate change. Large mammals are keystone species, playing an important role in ecosystem structure and function as ecological engineers, while being highly susceptible to deforestation, habitat degradation , and human exp...
Article
Full-text available
Forest loss is one of the most serious threats to biodiversity in the tropics and mainly occurs due to the conversion of native forests by the expansion of human activities. In addition, regional climate change is likely to adversely affect the remaining biota. These disturbances may have direct or indirect consequences on the demographic structure...
Article
Full-text available
The Amazon forest has the highest biodiversity on Earth. However, information on Amazonian vertebrate diversity is still deficient and scattered across the published, peer-reviewed, and gray literature and in unpublished raw data. Camera traps are an effective non-invasive method of surveying vertebrates, applicable to different scales of time and...
Article
Increasing food production while preserving natural ecosystem services linked to native biodiversity is one of the most important societal challenges in the 21st-century. Natural pollination performed by bees significantly increases yields even in crops that do not strictly depend on animal pollination, such as soybean. However, several factors, su...
Article
Full-text available
The Amazon forest has the highest biodiversity on earth. However, information on Amazonian vertebrate diversity is still deficient and scattered across the published, peer‐reviewed and grey literature and in unpublished raw data. Camera traps are an effective non‐invasive method of surveying vertebrates, applicable to different scales of time and s...
Article
In our paper “No visit, no interest: How COVID-19 has affected public interest in world's national parks” (Souza et al., 2021) we use culturomic data and methods to provide a global overview of internet search interest in national parks during and before the COVID-19 pandemic. Our analysis highlighted steep and widespread declines in searches for...
Article
Full-text available
• Escalating human development has severely threatened natural ecosystems, especially in the Tropics, resulting in the wholesale replacement and fragmentation of native habitats and their biotas. As a result, wild vertebrates have often become isolated in natural vegetation patches surrounded by different anthropogenic land cover (ALC) types of var...
Article
Full-text available
The use of digital content has become a powerful tool to evaluate and track macro-scale trends in human-nature relations. This is an emerging field of study known as conservation culturomics, that seeks to understand human culture through quantitative analysis in large bodies of digital content. Here, we used relative search volume on Google Search...
Article
Full-text available
The persistent high deforestation rate and fragmentation of the Amazon forests are the main threats to their biodiversity. To anticipate and mitigate these threats, it is important to understand and predict how species respond to the rapidly changing landscape. The short-eared dog Atelocynus microtis is the only Amazon-endemic canid and one of the...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated short-eared dog habitat associations on two spatial scales. First, we used the largest record database ever compiled for short-eared dogs in combination with species distribution models to map species habitat suitability, estimate its distribution range and predict shifts in species distribution in response to predicted deforestatio...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical forests are the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth. Unfortunately, they are often degraded by large enterprises that convert large areas of continuous forest into forest mosaics or into deforested areas in order to seek economic development through infrastructure construction. This study evaluates how the assemblage of nonvolant small mam...
Article
Full-text available
Amazonia forest plays a major role in providing ecosystem services for human and sanctuaries for wildlife. However, ongoing deforestation and habitat fragmentation in the Brazilian Amazon has threatened both. The ocelot is an ecologically important mesopredator and a potential conservation ambassador species, yet there are no previous studies on it...
Article
Full-text available
The flood pulse is the main factor structuring and differentiating the ecological communities of Amazonian unflooded (terra firme) and seasonally-flooded (várzea) forests as they require unique adaptations to survive the prolonged annual floods. Therefore, várzea and terra firme forests hammer out a spatio-temporal mosaic of resource availability,...
Data
Camera trap variables metadata Abbreviations and description of landscape and human disturbance variables extracted from 279 camera trap stations in the middle Juruá region, Amazonas, Brazil.
Data
Mean water level of the Juruá River obtained from daily readings recorded over 38 years (from 1st January 1973 to 31st December 2010) at Gavião Metereological Station in Carauari-AM
Data
Camera trap raw data metadada Abbreviations and Linnean binomials of 25 terrestrial vertebrate species recorded across the middle Juruá region in unflooded and flooded forests
Data
Camera trap variables Landscape and human disturbance variables extracted from 279 camera trap stations in the middle Juruá region, Amazonas, Brazil.
Data
Map of the study area in the central Rio Juruá region of western Brazilian Amazonia, Amazonas, Brazil Map inset shows the geographic location of the Juruá river and study region. The boundaries of the RESEX Médio Juruá and RDS Uacari are outlined in black. Seasonally flooded forests and terra firme forests are represented in light and dark gray res...
Data
Camera trap raw data Number of detections of 25 terrestrial vertebrate species recorded across the middle Juruá region in unflooded and flooded forests
Preprint
Full-text available
The flood pulse is the main factor structuring and differentiating the ecological communities of Amazonian unflooded ( terra firme ) and seasonally-flooded ( várzea ) forests as they require unique adaptations to survive the prolonged annual floods. Therefore, várzea and terra firme forests hammer out a spatio-temporal mosaic of resource availabili...
Preprint
Full-text available
The flood pulse is the main factor structuring and differentiating the ecological communities of Amazonian unflooded ( terra firme ) and seasonally-flooded ( várzea ) forests as they require unique adaptations to survive the prolonged annual floods. Therefore, várzea and terra firme forests hammer out a spatio-temporal mosaic of resource availabili...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical biodiversity benefits humanity. However, the costs of conserving topical biodiversity are largely borne by local communities. The damage caused by wild animals to human-cultivated plants (crop-raiding) in tropical ecosystems directly affects the livelihoods of local agriculturalists, which erodes their support for conserving biodiversity....
Article
Full-text available
The degree to which terrestrial vertebrate populations are depleted in tropical forests occupied by human communities has been the subject of an intense polarising debate that has important conservation implications. Conservation ecologists and practitioners are divided over the extent to which community-based subsistence offtake is compatible with...
Data
Supplementary material. Appendix A—Species taxonomic relatedness, Appendix B—Species activity patterns, Appendix C—Additional species traits, Appendix D—Camera trapping methods, Appendix E—Local interviews and livelihoods, Appendix F—Spatial data, Appendix G—Group biomass GLMMs, Appendix H—Species temporal activity pattern GLMMs, Appendix I—Protect...
Data
Camera trap dataset. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
We report threats to hoary (Lycalopex vetulus) and crab-eating foxes (Cerdocyon thous) at cattle farms in the southeast of Goiás state, Brazil, and on a federal road at Minas Gerais state, including the possible first documented crab-eating fox intentionally poisoned in Brazil. Greater awareness and understanding of threats faced by Brazilian carni...
Article
Full-text available
Based on freshly collected and recorded topotypes, we re-describe Leptodactylus jolyi and describe a closely related new species from the municipality of Uberlândia (MG, Brazil). As some other species of the L. fuscus group, the new species present longitudinal skin folds on dorsal surface of shank. Leptodactylus marambaiae is a shorte-legged speci...
Article
Based on freshly collected and recorded topotypes, we re-describe Leptodactylus jolyi and describe a closely related new species from the municipality of Uberlândia (MG, Brazil). As some other species of the L. fuscus group, the new species present longitudinal skin folds on dorsal surface of shank. Leptodactylus marambaiae is a shorte-legged speci...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Eisenberg, J. F. THE MAMMALIAN RADIATIONS: AN ANALYSIS OF TRENDS IN EVOLUTION, ADAPTATION, AND BEHAVIOR. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, xx + 610 pp., 1981.

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Extractive and sustainable development reserves are increasing in number and aggregate area across tropical forest regions. Yet there is little understanding of how sustainable current harvests of forest and freshwater resources actually are. We work in western Brazilian Amazonia, where deforestation rates remain low but where many natural resources extracted by human populations for subsistence or sale are at risk of overexploitation. Resources are harvested from forest environments (e.g. game vertebrates, fruits and seeds, medicinal oleoresins) and freshwater bodies (e.g. fish and turtles from oxbow lakes, streams and rivers) to sustain the basic livelihoods of both reserve residents and the surrounding population. Projeto Médio Juruá (PMJ) is named after our study location in the Brazilian State of Amazonas, along the mid-section of the Rio Juruá – a prominently meandering tributary of the Rio Solimões. Our work in this region has been primarily based in two contiguous reserves in the municipal district of Carauari: the Uacari Sustainable Development Reserve (RDS Uacari) and the Médio Juruá Extractive Reserve (ResEx Médio Juruá) but also extends to rural communities and urban centres outside the official protected areas. Ultimately this project aims to develop, in partnership with our collaborating institutions in Brazil, a sustainable co-management protocol to inform the sustainable use of game, fisheries and other non-timber forest products by rural communities throughout the Brazilian Amazon.
Project
http://www.projetomediojurua.org Extractive and sustainable development reserves are increasing in number and aggregate area across tropical forest regions. Yet there is little understanding of how sustainable current harvests of forest and freshwater resources actually are. We work in western Brazilian Amazonia, where deforestation rates remain low but where many natural resources extracted by human populations for subsistence or sale are at risk of overexploitation. Resources are harvested from forest environments (e.g. game vertebrates, fruits and seeds, medicinal oleoresins) and freshwater bodies (e.g. fish and turtles from oxbow lakes, streams and rivers) to sustain the basic livelihoods of both reserve residents and the surrounding population. Projeto Médio Juruá (PMJ) is named after our study location in the Brazilian State of Amazonas, along the mid-section of the Rio Juruá – a prominently meandering tributary of the Rio Solimões. Our work in this region has been primarily based in two contiguous reserves in the municipal district of Carauari: the Uacari Sustainable Development Reserve (RDS Uacari) and the Médio Juruá Extractive Reserve (ResEx Médio Juruá) but also extends to rural communities and urban centres outside the official protected areas. Ultimately this project aims to develop, in partnership with our collaborating institutions in Brazil, a sustainable co-management protocol to inform the sustainable use of game, fisheries and other non-timber forest products by rural communities throughout the Brazilian Amazon.