Hugo Cayuela

Hugo Cayuela
Claude Bernard University Lyon 1 | UCBL · Laboratoire de biométrie et biologie evolutive (LBBE)

PhD
Postdoctoral researcher, University of Lyon

About

81
Publications
35,471
Reads
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1,079
Citations
Introduction
I am a population biologist whose research interest focuses on three main themes: (1) Biodemography, life history, and aging; (2) Dispersal ecology and evolution; (3) Adaptation and population genomics. I use integrative approaches combining field records, experimental observations, genomic data, and modelling (capture-recapture models, populations matrix models). See my personal website: http://hugocayuela51.wixsite.com/cayuela-hugo
Additional affiliations
July 2020 - present
University of Lausanne
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2017 - June 2020
Laval University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2016 - August 2016
University of Lyon
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
November 2012 - March 2016
University of Lyon
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolution
September 2009 - March 2012
Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (81)
Article
Full-text available
There is growing evidence that anthropogenic landscapes can strongly influence the evolution of dispersal, particularly through fragmentation, and may drive organisms into an evolutionary trap by suppressing dispersal. However, the influence on dispersal evolution of anthropogenic variation in habitat patch turnover has so far been largely overlook...
Article
Full-text available
1. Temperature is a critical driver of ectotherm life history strategies, whereby a warmer environment is associated with increased growth, reduced longevity, and accelerated senescence. Increasing evidence indicates that thermal adaptation may underly such life history shifts in wild populations. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and Copy Num...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in temperature is known to influence mortality patterns in ectotherms. Even though a few experimental studies on model organisms have reported a positive relationship between temperature and actuarial senescence (i.e., the increase in mortality risk with age), how variation in climate influences the senescence rate across the range of a s...
Article
Full-text available
Sex-related differences in mortality are widespread in the animal kingdom. Although studies have shown that sex determination systems might drive lifespan evolution, sex chromosome influences on aging rates have not been investigated so far, likely due to an apparent lack of demographic data from clades including both XY (with heterogametic males)...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative studies of mortality in the wild are necessary to understand the evolution of aging; yet, ectothermic tetrapods are underrepresented in this comparative landscape, despite their suitability for testing evolutionary hypotheses. We present a study of aging rates and longevity across wild tetrapod ectotherms, using data from 107 population...
Article
Amphibia is the most threatened class among vertebrates, with more than 40% of the species threatened with extinction. Pollution is thought to alter amphibian population dynamics. With the growing interest in behavioral ecotoxicology, the neurotoxic organophosphate pesticides are of special concerns. Understanding how the exposure to neurotoxics le...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Anthropocene is tightly associated with a drastic loss of species worldwide, and consequently, with the disappearance of key ecosystem functions. The ongoing reduction in species functionality is driven by global and local threats. The orders Testudines (turtles and tortoises) and Crocodilia (crocodilians and alligators) contain numerous threat...
Article
Full-text available
Human activities and resource exploitation led to a massive decline of wild salmonid populations, consequently numerous conservation programs have been developed to supplement wild populations. However, many studies documented reduced fitness of hatchery-born relative to wild fish. Here, by using both RNA sequencing and Whole Genome Bisulfite Seque...
Article
Full-text available
Compensatory recruitment is a key demographic mechanism that has allowed the coexistence of populations of susceptible amphibians with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a fungus causing one of the most devastating emerging infectious disease ever recorded among vertebrates. However, the underlying processes (e.g. density‐dependent increase in su...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic plasticity, the ability of one genotype to produce different phenotypes in different environments, plays a central role in species' response to environmental changes. Transgenerational plasticity (TGP) allows the transmission of this environmentally induced phenotypic variation across generations, and can influence adaptation. To date, t...
Article
Full-text available
Durant le 20 ème siècle, les populations de Sonneurs à ventre jaune (Bombina variegata) ont subi un net déclin en Europe de l'Ouest, et en France tout particulièrement. Les causes de cette régression sont possiblement multiples, incluant la perte et la fragmentation d'habitat, ainsi que les changements climatiques. De nos jours, les forêts de produ...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a central process in ecology and evolution with far reaching consequences for the dynamics and genetics of spatially structured populations (SSPs). Individuals can adjust their decisions to disperse according to local fitness prospects, resulting in context-dependent dispersal. By determining dispersal rate, distance and direction , th...
Article
Full-text available
Across a species range, multiple sources of environmental heterogeneity, at both small and large scales, create complex landscapes of selection, which may challenge adaptation, particularly when gene flow is high. One key to multidimensional adaptation may reside in the heterogeneity of recombination along the genome. Structural variants, like chro...
Article
Full-text available
The interplay between recombination rate, genetic drift and selection modulates variation in genome-wide ancestry. Understanding the selective processes at play is of prime importance toward predicting potential beneficial or negative effects of supplementation with domestic strains (i.e., human-introduced strains). In a system of lacustrine popula...
Article
Full-text available
When facing an emerging infectious disease of conservation concern, we often have little information on the nature of the host-parasite interaction to inform management decisions. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the life-history strategies of host species can be predictive of individual and population-level responses to infectious d...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing evidence shows that structural variants represent an overlooked aspect of genetic variation with consequential evolutionary roles. Among those, copy number variants (CNVs), including duplicated genomic region and transposable elements (TEs) may contribute to local adaptation and/or reproductive isolation among divergent populations. Thos...
Preprint
Full-text available
The molecular mechanisms underlying intraspecific variation in life history strategies are still poorly understood, despite the importance of this question for understanding of organism's responses to environmental variability. Theoretical work proposed that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation might regulate intraspecific variation in lif...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the mechanisms underlying population decline is a critical challenge for conservation biologists. Both deterministic (e.g. habitat loss, fragmentation, and Allee effect) andstochastic (i.e. demographic and environmental stochasticity) demographic processes are involved in population decline. Simultaneously, a decrease of population si...
Preprint
Full-text available
Across a species range, spatially-varying environments can drive the evolution of local adaptation. Multiples sources of environmental heterogeneity, at small and large scales, draw complex landscapes of selection which may challenge adaptation, particularly when gene flow is high. Because linkage opposes gene flow but also limits the efficiency of...
Article
Full-text available
Aim When modelling future or past geographic distributions of a species, attention should be paid to the possible differentiated responses to climate changes between lineages. Dispersal also plays an important role in the capacity of species to track suitable climate, which is particularly relevant for amphibians with limited dispersal ability. In...
Article
Full-text available
Aging evolutionary theories predict that patterns of actuarial and reproductive senescence should be aligned, with a common onset of senescence set at the age of first reproduction. However, a few empirical studies reported asynchrony between actuarial and reproductive senescence. This asynchrony is expected to be particularly pronounced in organis...
Article
Full-text available
Copy number variants (CNVs) are a major component of genotypic and phenotypic variation in genomes. To date, our knowledge of genotypic variation and evolution has largely been acquired by means of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) analyses. Until recently, the adaptive role of structural variants (SVs) and particularly that of CNVs has been ov...
Article
Full-text available
Gene flow has tremendous importance on local adaptation, by influencing the fate of de novo mutations, maintaining standing genetic variation, and driving adaptive introgression. Furthermore, structural variation as chromosomal rearrangements may facilitate adaptation despite high gene flow. However, our understanding of evolutionary mechanisms imp...
Preprint
Full-text available
Increasing evidence shows that structural variants represent an overlooked aspect of genetic variation with consequential evolutionary roles. Among those, copy number variants (CNVs), including duplicated genomic region and transposable elements (TEs) may contribute to local adaptation and/or reproductive isolation among divergent populations. Thos...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying the drivers of population fluctuations in spatially distinct populations remains a significant challenge for ecologists. Whereas regional climatic factors may generate population synchrony (i.e., the Moran effect), local factors including the level of density‐dependence may reduce the level of synchrony. Although divergences in the scal...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a central process in ecology and evolution. It strongly influences the dynamics of spatially structured populations and affects evolutionary processes by shaping patterns of gene flow. For these reasons, dispersal has received considerable attention from ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and conservationists. Although it has been st...
Preprint
Full-text available
Copy number variants (CNVs) are a major component of genotypic and phenotypic variation in genomes. Yet, our knowledge on genotypic variation and evolution is often limited to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and the role of CNVs has been overlooked in non-model species, partly due to their challenging identification until recently. Here, we d...
Article
Full-text available
Patterns of actuarial senescence can be highly variable among species. Previous comparative analyses revealed that both age at the onset of senescence and rates of senescence are linked to position of a species along the fast‐slow life‐history continuum. As there are few long‐term datasets of wild populations with known‐age individuals, intraspecif...
Preprint
Full-text available
Phenotypic plasticity, the ability of one genotype to produce different phenotypes in different environments, plays a central role in species’ response to environmental changes. Transgenerational plasticity (TGP) allows the transmission of this environmentally-induced phenotypic variation across generations, and can influence adaptation. To date, t...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is growing evidence that anthropogenic landscapes can strongly influence the evolution of dispersal, particularly through fragmentation, and may drive organisms into an evolutionary trap by suppressing dispersal. However, the influence on dispersal evolution of anthropogenic variation in habitat patch turnover has so far been largely overlook...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing the immediate and long‐term evolutionary consequences of human‐mediated hybridization is of major concern for conservation biology. Several studies have documented how selection in interaction with recombination modulates introgression at a genome‐wide scale, but few have considered the dynamics of this process within and among chromosome...
Preprint
Full-text available
Population genetic theory states that adaptation most frequently occurs from standing genetic variation, which results from the interplay between different evolutionary processes including mutation, chromosomal rearrangements, drift, gene flow and selection. To date, empirical work focusing on the contribution of standing genetic variation to local...
Article
Full-text available
Kin selection and dispersal play a critical role in the evolution of cooperative breeding systems. Limited dispersal increases relatedness in spatially structured populations (population viscosity), with the result that neighbours tend to be genealogical relatives. Yet the increase in neighbours’ fitness-related performance through altruistic inter...
Article
Full-text available
Actuarial senescence has been viewed for a long time as an inevitable and uniform process. However, the work on senescence has mainly focused on endotherms with deterministic growth and low regeneration capacity during the adult stage, leading to a strong taxonomic bias in the study of aging. Recent studies have highlighted that senescence could in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding the mechanisms underlying biological extinctions is a critical challenge for conservation biologists. Both deterministic (e.g. habitat loss, fragmentation) and stochastic (i.e. demographic stochasticity, Allee effect) demographic processes are involved in population decline. Simultaneously, a decrease of population size has far-reachi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Assessing the immediate and long-term evolutionary consequences of human-mediated hybridization is of major concern for conservation biology. Several studies have documented how selection in interaction with recombination modulates introgression at a genome-wide scale, but few have considered the dynamics of this process within and between chromoso...
Article
Full-text available
Actuarial senescence appears to be a common process, and senescence patterns are highly variable across the tree of life. To date, studies on animal senescence have largely focused on model species, such as as fruit flies, humans and a few other endotherms. In contrast, our knowledge about ageing remains fragmentary in ectotherm vertebrates, such a...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Transport infrastructure such as roads has been reported to negatively affect dispersal. Their effects on dispersal are thought to be complex, depending on the characteristics of the structure and the intensity of the traffic using it. In addition, individual factors, such as age, may strongly affect dispersal decisions and success when in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Patterns of actuarial senescence can be highly variable among species. Previous comparative analyses revealed that both age at the onset of senescence and rates of senescence are linked to the species' position along the fast-slow life-history continuum. As there are few long-term datasets of wild populations with known-age individuals, intraspecif...
Preprint
Full-text available
Actuarial senescence (hereafter 'senescence') has been viewed for a long time as an inevitable and uniform process. However, the work on senescence has mainly focused on endotherms (especially mammals) with deterministic growth and low regeneration capacity at adult stages, leading to a strong taxonomic bias in the study of aging. Recent studies ha...
Article
Full-text available
Relocations are increasingly popular among wildlife managers despite often low rates of relocation success in vertebrates. In this context, understanding the influence of extrinsic (e.g., relocation design, habitat characteristics) and intrinsic factors (e.g., age and sex) on demographic parameters, such as survival, that regulate the dynamics of r...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a key process in ecology and evolution. Both theoretical and empirical evidence in actively dispersing organisms support the general notion that the use of nearly straight dispersal paths is a highly efficient way to maximize dispersal success in heterogenous landscapes. In homogeneous landscapes, in contrast, the benefits of a straigh...
Article
Full-text available
Life-history theory states that, during the lifetime of an individual, resources are allocated to either somatic maintenance or reproduction. Resource allocation trade-offs determine the evolution and ecology of life-history strategies and determine an organisms’ position along the fast-slow continuum. Theory predicts that environmental stochastici...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding age-dependent mortality processes is a critical challenge for population biologists. Actuarial senescence appears to be a common process across the tree of life. Senescence patterns are highly variable in pluricellular organisms: senescence can be gradual or sharp and its onset may be early or delayed. By contrast, studies revealed th...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a central mechanism in ecology and evolution. Dispersal evolution is driven by a trade-off between costs and benefits, which is influenced by interindividual variability and local environmental conditions (context-dependent dispersal). Many studies have investigated how dispersal decisions may be influenced by environmental factors, in...
Article
Full-text available
1. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the dynamics of spatially structured populations (SSP) is a critical challenge for ecologists and conservation managers. Internal population processes such as births and deaths occur at a local level, while external processes such as dispersal take place at an inter-population level. At both levels, den...
Preprint
Full-text available
Kin selection and dispersal play a critical role in the evolution of cooperative breeding systems. Limited dispersal dramatically increases relatedness in spatially structured populations (population viscosity), with the result that neighbours tend to be genealogical relatives. Yet the increase in neighbour performance through altruistic interactio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Life-history theory states that, during the lifetime of an individual, resources are allocated to either somatic maintenance or reproduction. Resource allocation trade-offs determine the evolution and ecology of life-history strategies and determine an organisms' position along the fast-slow continuum. Theory predicts that environmental stochastici...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is one of the main processes that determine community structure. Individuals make dispersal decisions according to environmental and/or social cues that reflect the fitness prospects in a given patch. The presence and abundance of heterospecifics within the same ecological guild, and/or their breeding success, may act as public informatio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Dispersal is a central process in ecology and evolution. It strongly influences the dynamics of spatially structured populations, by affecting population growth rate and local colonization-extinction processes. Dispersal can also influence evolutionary processes because it determines rates and patterns of gene flow in spatially structured populatio...
Preprint
Dispersal is a central process in ecology and evolution. It strongly influences the dynamics of spatially structured populations, by affecting population growth rate and local colonization-extinction processes. Dispersal can also influence evolutionary processes because it determines rates and patterns of gene flow in spatially structured populatio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Relocations are increasingly popular among wildlife managers despite sharp debate and low rate of relocation success in vertebrates. In this context, understanding the influence of extrinsic (e.g., relocation design, habitat characteristics) and intrinsic factors (e.g., age and sex) on demographic parameters such as survival that regulate the dynam...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the impact of weather fluctuations on demographic parameters is of crucial interest to biodiversity research in a context of global climate change. Amphibians are valuable candidates for investigating this topic due to their strong physiological dependence on water availability and temperature. In this study, we took advantage of data...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal (i.e. movement from a natal or breeding site to another breeding site) is a central process in ecology and evolution as it affects the eco-evolutionary dynamics of spatially structured populations. Dispersal evolution is regulated by the balance between costs and benefits, which is influenced by the individual phenotype (i.e. phenotype-de...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a central process in ecology and evolution. At the individual level, the three stages of the dispersal process (i.e. emigration, transience and immigration) are affected by complex interactions between phenotypes and environmental factors. Condition and context‐dependent dispersal have far‐reaching consequences, both for the demography...