Hugh H. Genoways

Hugh H. Genoways
University of Nebraska at Lincoln | NU · University of Nebraska State Museum

Hastings College and University of Kansas

About

330
Publications
55,003
Reads
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4,194
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2006 - March 2016
University of Nebraska at Lincoln
Position
  • Professor Emeritus
July 1998 - July 2006
University of Nebraska at Lincoln
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Taught: Mammalogy, Economic Value of Mammals
September 1989 - June 2006
University of Nebraska State Museum
Position
  • Professor of the State Museum (tenured)
Description
  • Chair of Program Taught: Museum Administration and Management, Contemporary Museum Issues
Education
May 1963 - August 1971
University of Kansas
Field of study
  • Systematics and Ecology
September 1959 - May 1963
Hastings College
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (330)
Article
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A diminutive shrew from Sioux County, Nebraska, is shown to be the first state record for the dwarf shrew, Sorex nanus. This specimen appears to be a member of a dwarf shrew population occurring on the Great Plains in the vicinity of the Black Hills in western South Dakota, eastern Wyoming, and southeastern Montana, but not within the Black Hills p...
Article
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A survey of the archeological and paleontological literature allowed a compilation of Holocene records of mammals in Nebraska. This survey identified Holocene records from 338 sites in 62 of the 93 Nebraska counties. These counties were located throughout state, but there was a concentration of sites in southwestern Nebraska where there were 27 fos...
Article
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Information on the distribution and current status of 25 species or subspecies of mammals occurring in Nebraska are presented. The species covered include one shrew, an armadillo, eight bats, 10 rodents (including two subspecies of one species), three carnivores, and one artiodactyl. Distributional information reported includes the first state reco...
Article
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The Japanese-style mist net that mammalogists and ornithologists use extensively came into regular use by scientists in the 1950s and early 1960s and its use in capturing bats and birds unharmed is now worldwide. The history of the innovative mist net, which was originally made of silk and brought to the U.S. by ornithologist Oliver L. Austin, Jr.,...
Article
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Dr. Thomas Henry Kunz, an internationally recognized expert on the ecology and behavior of bats and Professor at Boston University, passed away on April 13, 2020 in Dedham, Massachusetts, at the age of 81 as the result of complications from COVID-19. “Tom,” to his many friends and colleagues, was born on June 11, 1938 in Independence, Missouri, to...
Article
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Our second selection for an innovation that changed mammalogy is the Japanese mist net, which was a repurposing of a centuries old invention. Prior to the availability of these nets, mammalogists had limited ability to sample members of the order Chiroptera. Samples of bats were obtained primarily from day roosts or hibernacula, or by shooting them...
Article
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On 12 August 2018, the American Society of Mammalogists (ASM) lost one of its giants of the latter half of the 20th century when Sydney Anderson quietly passed away at his home in Birmingham, Alabama, at the age of 91. “Syd,” to his many friends and colleagues, was born on 11 January 1927 in Topeka, Kansas, to Robert Grant and Evelyn Fern (Hunt) An...
Chapter
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Several mechanisms have been shown to influence species richness among island ecosystems, yet most studies limit their focus to a few predictor variables. The objective of this study is to investigate variation in Chiropteran richness across islands in the Caribbean Basin with an extensive set of predictor variables. Using recent faunal surveys, th...
Chapter
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This article describes Robert James Baker’s academic pedigree and genealogy, his scientific productivity (number of publications), his citations, his students, his contributions to his university and scientific societies, his personality in relation to his scientific achievements, his legacy, and a personal note of appreciation by individuals who w...
Chapter
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The Neotropical variegated squirrel, Sciurus variegatoides, is represented in Nicaragua by five known subspecies—adolphei, belti, boothiae, dorsalis, and underwoodi. Analyses of morphometrics, color, and color patterns of 394 specimens from throughout the country and all available literature support the retention of these subspecies, but also revea...
Chapter
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Encomium in honor of Robert J. Baker and his career in mammalogy.
Article
Dear Robert: This is the letter that I always intended to write, but never found the right time to do it, so now seems as good a time as any. I want to take this opportunity to thank you for all of your kindness to me and my family over the years. I arrived in Lubbock in early September in 1971 with a newly minted Ph.D. and no idea of how to surviv...
Article
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Introduction to the memorial volume of Special Publications / Museum of Texas Tech University in honor of Robert J. Baker. First paragraph: Herein, we use the word “Overture” not in its first meaning, but rather in its second—“An introduction to something more substantial” ([Def. 2], Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press 2018). In our curren...
Chapter
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Historical observations and identifi cations of plants and animals in the vicinity of Engineer Cantonment in 1819–1820 (James 1822) are shown below in Roman and Roman italic print. Specimens identifi ed through phytoarcheological and zooarcheological analysis of materials and believed to be reasonably associated or contemporaneous with the Long Exp...
Chapter
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The fi rst modern biographer of Titian Ramsay Peale, Jessie Poesch (1961), evaluated Peale’s life as: “Not a giant of his time, his life and his work nonetheless have a compelling interest. Perhaps his very failures make him worthy of study. He experienced both the joy and satisfaction of achievement as well as the bitterness of defeat . . . .” The...
Chapter
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The Yellowstone Expedition of 1819–1820 was part of a larger scheme by the U. S. War Department to extend American infl uence along the frontier and to counter British activities in the years following the War of 1812 (Goodwin 1917; Wesley 1931). The expedition consisted of two contingents—a scientifi c party commanded by Major Stephen H. Long and...
Article
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Obituary and biography of Stephen Lory Williams (1948-2018). Excerpts: His move in 1990 returned him to Texas Tech University, taking up positions as Collection Manager in the Museum, and Adjunct Professor in the Museum Science Program. His final professional move was made in 1995 to the Department of Museum Studies at the Strecker Museum now known...
Data
Bibliography of published works to accompany obituary for Stephen Lory Williams (1948-2018)
Article
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Bibliography of the published works of Stephen Lory Williams (1948-2018).
Article
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Eight species of bat have been previously recorded from the island of Saint Lucia: Noctilio leporinus, Monophyllus plethodon, Artibeus jamaicensis, Brachyphylla cavernarum, Ardops nichollsi, Sturnira paulsoni, Molossus molossus, and Tadarida brasiliensis. Herein, we add a ninth species to the fauna—Pteronotus davyi. These nine species represent nin...
Article
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The chiropteran fauna of the island of Saint Vincent, represented by 12 species, is among the most complex in the Lesser Antilles, being represented by four families including Noctilionidae (1 species), Mormoopidae (1), Phyllostomidae (8), and Molossidae (2). This fauna includes four trophic guilds as represented by Noctilio leporinus (piscivore/in...
Article
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On 30 March 2018, the science of mammalogy and the American Society of Mammalogists lost one of the most influential figures of the last half-century. Robert James Baker died quietly at his home in Lubbock, Texas.
Article
Beginning in the mid-1950s many of Long Expedition artist Titian Ramsay Peale’s images have come into institutional holdings, particularly the American Philosophical Society, American Museum of Natural History, and Library of Congress, where they have been made freely available to researchers and for exhibitions. This has allowed a rediscovery and...
Article
Long’s Expedition was the first party with trained scientists to explore the American West in the name of the United States government. Historians have not been particularly kind to the expedition. William Goetzmann described the party as “A curious cavalcade of disgruntled career officers, eccentric scientists, and artist-playboys, . . .” Hiram Ch...
Article
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The bat fauna of the Caribbean island of Sint Eustatius consists of five documented species—Monophyllus plethodon, Brachyphylla cavernarum, Artibeus jamaicensis, Ardops nichollsi, and Molossus molossus—and one provisional species—Tadarida brasiliensis. The Insular Single-leaf Bat, M. plethodon, is reported in the scientific literature for the first...
Article
Full-text available
Long’s Expedition was the first party with trained scientists to explore the American West in the name of the United States government. Historians have not been particularly kind to the expedition. William Goetzmann described the party as “A curious cavalcade of disgruntled career officers, eccentric scientists, and artist-playboys, . . .” Hiram Ch...
Article
Full-text available
Beginning in the mid-1950s many of Long Expedition artist Titian Ramsay Peale’s images have come into institutional holdings, particularly the American Philosophical Society, American Museum of Natural History, and Library of Congress, where they have been made freely available to researchers and for exhibitions. This has allowed a rediscovery and...
Article
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Conclusions It is our contention that Thomas Say, Titian Peale, Edwin James, and their colleagues of the Stephen Long Expedition of 1819–1820 were heavily engaged in scientific research, which took the form of the first biodiversity inventory undertaken in the United States. This accomplishment has been overlooked both by biologists and historians,...
Article
Full-text available
Historical observations and identifications of plants and animals in the vicinity of Engineer Cantonment in 1819–1820 (James 1822) are shown below in Roman and Roman italic print. Specimens identified through phytoarcheological and zooarcheological analysis of materials and believed to be reasonably associated or contemporaneous with the Long Exped...
Article
Full-text available
Species endemic to oceanic islands offer unique insights into the mechanisms underlying evolution and have served as model systems for decades. Often these species show phenotypic variation that is correlated with the ecosystems in which they occur and such correlations may be a product of genetic drift, natural selection, and/or environmental fact...
Chapter
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This is the authors' collective attempt to provide an encomium (an honest song of praise) for Clyde Jones. After some urging from the editors of this volume, the authors conspired to share some memories of Clyde. Editors’ note: Due to various factors, this encomium was submitted too late to be included in the published memorial volume. However, in...
Chapter
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The chiropteran fauna of the Lesser Antilles consists of 27 species. The diversity of this fauna is low when compared with Neotropical faunas of large continental islands or at sites on the adjacent mainland, however, the Lesser Antillean fauna contains 11 species endemic to these islands making it worthy of large-scale conservation efforts. At the...
Data
Additional specimens sequenced but not used in final genetic analyses. (DOCX)
Article
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Background Cryptic morphological variation in the Chiropteran genus Myotis limits the understanding of species boundaries and species richness within the genus. Several authors have suggested that it is likely there are unrecognized species-level lineages of Myotis in the Neotropics. This study provides an assessment of the diversity in New World M...
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The adult sex ratio (ASR) is an important component of a population's demographics and can be used as an indicator of a population's status. However, the causes of annual variation in ASRs are unknown for many species. Fluctuations in ASR can arise through demographic stochasticity and intense selective harvesting. In this study we investigate the...
Article
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Jerry Ronald Choate (1943–2009) had just retired as Director of the Sternberg Museum of Natural History and Professor of Biological Sciences, Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas, at the time of his death. Jerry served the American Society of Mammalogists in numerous capacities, including Recording Secretary, First Vice President, and most nota...
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Currently, four species of Myotis are known from the islands of the Caribbean (Myotis dominicensis, M. martiniquensis, M. nesopolus, and M. nigricans). Myotis dominicensis and M. martiniquensis are endemic to the Lesser Antilles, whereas M. nesopolus and M. nigricans are considered conspecific with mainland populations. Recent phylogenetic and phyl...
Article
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Archeological and paleontological records indicate that the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) have a history of at least 20,000 years of occurrence within the current boundaries of Nebraska. Pronghorns occurred throughout the state for much of its history. With the evidence at hand we concluded that the eastern boundary of the geographic distributi...
Article
Blarina hylophaga (Elliot, 1899) is a soricid commonly called Elliot's short-tailed shrew. A short-legged, robust shrew with a long, pointed snout and a short tail; it is 1 of 4 species in the genus Blarina. It occurs throughout most of the Great Plains of the United States, where it inhabits moist, well-drained grassland and riparian areas with de...
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Short-tailed shrews (genus Blarina Gray, 1838) are characterized by divergent karyotypes and are genetically distinct. Blarina species are similar morphologically but, in most cases, can be distinguished morphometrically. Blarina distributions tend to be parapatric along well-defined contact zones; however, it has been suggested that the northern s...
Book
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Short-tailed shrews, genus Blarina, are common inhabitants of a variety of terrestrial habitats in most of eastern North America. Of the 4 species currently recognized, the northern short-tailed shrew, Blarina brevicauda (Say, 1823), is the most widely distributed, occurring from southern Canada southward to the central Great Plains and the Appalac...
Article
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The chiropteran fauna of Barbados includes representatives of four families — Noctilionidae, Phyllostomidae, Vespertilionidae, and Molossidae — including 1 piscivore (Noctilio leporinus), 1 omnivore (Brachyphylla cavernarum), 1 pollenivore/nectarivore (Monophyllus plethodon), 1 frugivore (Artibeus jamaicensis), and 2 insectivorous species (Myotis n...
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As currently understood the bat fauna of the British Virgin Islands consists of five species – Noctilio leporinus, Brachyphylla cavernarum, Artibeus jamaicensis, Tadarida brasiliensis , and Molossus molossus. Our knowledge of distribution of bats in the British Virgin Islands is far more limited than that in the United States Virgin Islands. As par...
Article
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Populations of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) are subjected to multiple forms of density-dependent and density-independent regulation. Little is known about the combined effects of these variables across multiple populations throughout the landscape. The objectives of this study were to examine long-term trends in density and recruitment in pron...
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Occurrences of mountain lions (Puma concolor) in Nebraska have been steadily increasing; however, reproductive activity in mountain lions has not been documented in the state. We present the first evidence of mountain lion reproduction in Nebraska since mountain lions recolonized the state in the early 1990s. On 28 February 2007, a spotted kitten w...
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Almost nothing is known concerning the chiropteran fauna on the Grenadine Islands, a chain of islands between St. Vincent and Grenada located near the southern end of the Lesser Antilles. Previously, only a single species—Glossophaga longirostris—had been reported from the Grenadines. Our research, conducted on 4 occasions over the period of 1980 t...
Chapter
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Understanding the geographic and environmental characteristics of islands that affect aspects of biodiversity is a major theme in ecology (Begon et al. 2006; Krebs 2001) and biogeography (Cox and Moore 2000; Drakare et al. 2006; Lomolino et al. 2006). Such understanding has become particularly relevant over the past century because human activities...
Article
Rollin H. Baker passed away on 12 November 2007, 1 day after reaching his 91st birthday. Rollin was a living legend, famous for his pioneering research on biogeography and natural history of Mexican mammals, especially rodents, for his contributions to the understanding of Michigan mammals, and for being a mentor and friend to all young, aspiring m...
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Rollin H. Baker passed away on November 12, 2007, one day after reaching his 91st birthday. Rollin was a living legend, famous for his pioneering research on biogeography and natural history of Mexican mammals, especially rodents, for his contributions to the understanding of Michigan mammals, and for being a mentor and friend to all young, aspirin...
Article
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We report on a young male, cinnamon-phase American black bear (Ursus americanus) that was collected in northwestern Nebraska on 12 May 2008. This specimen represents the first black bear taken in Nebraska since 1907. Cranial characteristics and mass of the individual indicated a 15–16 month old bear. This bear may have dispersed from the Laramie Mo...
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Currently there are no published accounts of the specific diets of mink (Mustela vison) in Nebraska. Herein, we present findings of an historic data set on the winter diets of mink in Nebraska. Gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of mink were collected by the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission during the 1946-1947 fur trapping season. The contents of the...
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Examinamos un ejemplar de Neotoma nelsoni colectado en el estado de Puebla, México, que representa el tercer registro de la especie y el primero para el estado. La distribución de la especie se restringe a la ladera este de los volcanes Pico de Orizaba y Cofre de Perote, principalmente en el bosque mesófilo de montaña. Neotoma nelsoni presenta cara...
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On 11 June 2000, Dr. Elmer C. Birney unexpectedly passed away from cardiac arrest suffered while outside caring for his cattle at his home in Blaine, Minnesota. One of his former students, Robert Timm, probably best expressed the immediate reaction of his family and many friends: “He was too young and in too good of health to be gone so soon.” At t...