Hugh F. Davies

Hugh F. Davies
Charles Darwin University | CDU · School of Environment

About

20
Publications
3,481
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223
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
216 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
Native mammals are suffering widespread and ongoing population declines across northern Australia. These declines are likely driven by multiple, interacting factors including altered fire regimes, predation by feral cats, and grazing by feral herbivores. In addition, the loss of tree hollows due to frequent, intense fires may also be contributing t...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the ongoing collapse of native mammal populations across northern Australia, the paucity of robust estimates of population density limits our capacity to identify and understand population change. Here we aimed to provide the first estimates of native mammal density on the Tiwi Islands-one of Australia's largest remaining refuge areas for n...
Article
Full-text available
Despite contributing to the ongoing collapse of native mammal populations across northern Australian savannas, we have limited understanding of the ecological constraints of feral cat population density in this system. Addressing such knowledge gaps is a crucial step towards mitigating the impacts of feral cats, and is particularly important for th...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation management is improved by incorporating information about the spatial distribution of population genetic diversity into planning strategies. Northern Australia is the location of some of the world's most severe ongoing declines of endemic mammal species, yet we have little genetic information from this regional mammal assemblage to inf...
Chapter
Australia, a continent recognized globally for its unique, endemic fauna, has a lamentable record of historic mammal extinctions. In the past 250 years, Australia has lost at least 34 mammal species, with many more species now threatened, or with greatly diminished geographic distributions. Due to its productive environment and limited land-clearin...
Article
Full-text available
1. The development of effective fire management for biodiversity conservation is a global challenge. The highly dynamic nature of fire, the difficulty in replicat-ing 'real-world' fire experiments and the need to understand population changes at large spatiotemporal scales make computer simulations particularly useful for identifying optimal fire m...
Article
Full-text available
Aim An interaction between reduced habitat structural complexity and predation by feral cats (Felis catus) has been hypothesized as the primary driver of mammal decline in northern Australia. However, we have a limited understanding of the drivers of the distribution and abundance of feral cats at a landscape scale, including whether the occurrence...
Article
In recent decades severe mammal declines have occurred in the vast and uncleared tropical savannas of northern Australia. Mounting evidence suggests that feral cats (Felis catus), large feral herbivores and increased frequency of high-severity fires, are all contributing to declines; however, the respective influence of each threat remains unclear....
Article
Full-text available
The threatened northern brush-tailed phascogale (Phascogale pirata) is one of the most poorly known mammals in Australia. While the few available records indicate a decline in its distribution and abundance, it has not previously been subject to intensive targeted survey. Here, we trialled a specifically tailored methodology for detection of P. pir...
Article
Full-text available
Native mammals across northern Australia have suffered severe decline, with feral cats (Felis catus), introduced herbivores and changed fire regimes being implicated as drivers. However, uncertainty surrounding the relative contribution of each of these threats, and the interactions between them, is limiting the development of effective management...
Article
Introduced sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) are increasing in abundance and distribution across much of south-eastern Australia and causing damage to native ecosystems. However, the current paucity of knowledge surrounding many aspects of sambar deer ecology is limiting our capacity to make informed management decisions, and properly gauge the extent of...
Article
Full-text available
Context: There is an increasing awareness that feral cats play a key role in driving the ongoing decline of small mammals across northern Australia; yet, the factors that control the distribution, abundance and behaviour of feral cats are poorly understood. These key knowledge gaps make it near-impossible for managers to mitigate the impacts of cat...
Article
Since European settlement, many granivorous birds of northern Australia's savanna landscapes have declined. One such example, the partridge pigeon (Geophaps smithii), has suffered a significant range contraction, disappearing from at least half of its pre‐European range. Multiple factors have been implicated in this decline, including the loss of t...
Article
Full-text available
Detecting trends in species’ distribution and abundance are essential for conserving threatened species, and depend upon effective monitoring programmes. Despite this, monitoring programmes are often designed without explicit consideration of their ability to deliver the information required by managers, such as their power to detect population cha...
Article
1 The increasing awareness that a fire regime that promotes biodiversity in one system can threaten biodiversity in another has resulted in a shift away from fire management based on vague notions of maximising pyrodiversity, towards determining the optimal fire regime based on the demonstrated requirements of target species. 2 We utilised a long‐r...
Article
Full-text available
Australia has contributed a disproportionate number of the world's mammal extinctions over the past 200 years, with the greatest loss of species occurring through the continent's southern and central arid regions. Many taxonomically and ecologically similar species are now undergoing widespread decline across the northern Australian mainland, possi...
Article
To investigate whether feral cats influence the distribution of Australia's largest remnant population of the threatened brush-tailed rabbit-rat Conilurus penicillatus and examine whether they influenced the extinction probability of C. penicillatus over a 15-year period (2000–2015). Melville Island, northern Australia. In 2015, small mammal survey...
Article
Many mammals in Australia's tropical north are in severe decline, yet understanding of the drivers of this decline is remarkably limited. Recently, Fisher et al. (Global Ecology and Biogeography, 2014, 23, 181−190) examined the traits that are associated with declining marsupial species in northern Australia. They concluded that, in this region, de...

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