Hiroyuki Koike

Hiroyuki Koike
Nippon Medical School · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

PhD

About

26
Publications
10,067
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,589
Citations
Introduction
Hiroyuki Koike is a Senior Assistant Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nippon Medical School, specializing in stem cell biology and developmental biology. He has been conducting organoid research using human iPS cells, including creating continuous multi-organ organoids of liver-bile duct-pancreas. In recent years, he has been studying cell-cell interactions by single-cell analysis to clarify the factors that disrupt tissue homeostasis.
Additional affiliations
April 2019 - March 2022
Nippon Medical School
Position
  • Assistant Professor
March 2018 - March 2019
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
Position
  • Assistant Professor
November 2015 - February 2018
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Position
  • Research fellow
Education
April 2010 - March 2014
Yokohama City University
Field of study
  • Medicine
April 2007 - March 2009
Tohoku University
Field of study
April 2003 - March 2007
Tohoku University
Field of study

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Organogenesis is a complex and interconnected process that is orchestrated by multiple boundary tissue interactions1–7. However, it remains unclear how individual, neighbouring components coordinate to establish an integral multi-organ structure. Here we report the continuous patterning and dynamic morphogenesis of hepatic, biliary and pancreatic s...
Article
Full-text available
Visceral organs, such as the lungs, stomach and liver, are derived from the fetal foregut through a series of inductive interactions between the definitive endoderm (DE) and the surrounding splanchnic mesoderm (SM). While DE patterning is fairly well studied, the paracrine signaling controlling SM regionalization and how this is coordinated with ep...
Article
Human organoids are emerging as a valuable resource to investigate human organ development and disease. The applicability of human organoids has been limited, partly due to the oversimplified architecture of the current technology, which generates single-tissue organoids that lack inter-organ structural connections. Thus, engineering organoid syste...
Article
Full-text available
Liver bud progenitors experience a transient amplification during early organ growth phase, yet the responsible mechanism was not fully understood. Collective evidence highlighted the specific requirements in stem cell metabolism for expanding organ progenitors during organogenesis and regeneration. Here, transcriptome analyses showed progenitors o...
Article
Unlabelled: Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins play crucial roles in self-renewal of stem cells by suppressing a host of genes through histone modifications. Identification of the downstream genes of PcG proteins is essential for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of stem cell self-renewal. However, little is known about the PcG target genes in ti...
Article
Full-text available
Muscle wasting is a major problem leading to reduced quality of life and higher risks of mortality and various diseases. Muscle atrophy is caused by multiple conditions in which protein degradation exceeds its synthesis, including disuse, malnutrition, and microgravity. While Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is well known to regulate calcium and phosphate...
Article
Skeletal muscle atrophy is caused by various conditions, including aging, disuse related to a sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity, and cachexia. Our insufficient understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying muscle atrophy limits the targets for the development of effective pharmacologic treatments and preventions. Here, we iden...
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Preclinical identification of compounds at risk of causing drug induced liver injury (DILI) remains a significant challenge in drug development, highlighting a need for a predictive human system to study complicated DILI mechanism and susceptibility to individual drug. Here, we established a human liver organoid (HLO) based scree...
Preprint
Visceral organs, such as the lungs, stomach, liver and pancreas, derive from the fetal foregut through a series of inductive interactions between the definitive endoderm (DE) epithelium and the surrounding splanchnic mesoderm (SM). This foregut patterning, which occurs between embryonic day (E) 8.5 and E9.5 in the mouse embryo, equivalent to 17-23...
Preprint
Organogenesis is a complex and inter-connected process, orchestrated by multiple boundary tissue interactions. Here, we established the protocol of the continuous patterning of hepatic, biliary and pancreatic structures from a three-dimensional culture of human pluripotent stem cell (PSC). The boundary interactions between anterior and posterior gu...
Article
Human organoid systems recapitulate in vivo organ architecture yet fail to capture complex pathologies such as inflammation and fibrosis. Here, using 11 different healthy and diseased pluripotent stem cell lines, we developed a reproducible method to derive multi-cellular human liver organoids composed of hepatocyte-, stellate-, and Kupffer-like ce...
Article
Full-text available
Use of hepatocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (i-Heps) is limited by their functional differences in comparison with primary cells. Extracellular niche factors likely play a critical role in bridging this gap. Using image-based characterization (high content analysis; HCA) of freshly isolated hepatocytes from 17 human donors, we de...
Article
Full-text available
The discovery of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has provided new opportunities for studying human diseases and, ultimately, generating therapies. However, the practical application of iPSCs remains a challenge due to the failure of current two-dimensional culture methods targeted on generating single pure lineage cells. The developmen...
Chapter
Full-text available
Due to the severe shortage of organ donors, over 100,000 patients waiting for transplants per year die of end-stage organ failure in the United States alone. Laboratory-grown functional organs derived from pluripotent stem cells, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), may be one promising solution to this organ shortage. However, it has be...
Article
Transplantation of in-vitro-generated organ buds is a promising approach toward regenerating functional and vascularized organs. Though it has been recently shown in the context of liver models, demonstrating the applicability of this approach to other systems by delineating the molecular mechanisms guiding organ bud formation is critical. Here, we...
Article
Full-text available
Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a novel source of hepatocytes for drug development, disease modeling studies, and regenerative therapy for the treatment of liver diseases. A number of protocols for generating functional hepatocytes have been reported worldwide; however, reproducible and efficient differentiation remained chal...
Article
Full-text available
In embryonic liver, hepatic progenitor cells are actively proliferating and generate a fundamental cellular pool for establishing parenchymal components. However, the molecular basis for the expansion of the progenitors maintaining their immature state remains elusive. Polycomb group proteins regulate gene expression throughout the genome by modula...
Article
Full-text available
Mass-scale production of hepatocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with functional properties of primary hepatocytes is of great value in clinical transplantation for liver failure as well as in facilitating drug development by predicting humanized drug metabolism profiles. In this report, we generated human hepatocyte-like cell...
Article
Full-text available
Generation of functional and vascularized organs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCPSCPSCs) will facilitate our understanding of human developmental biology and disease modeling, hopefully offering a drug-screening platform and providing novel therapies against end-stage organ failure. Here we describe a protocol for the in vitro gener...
Article
Full-text available
A critical shortage of donor organs for treating end-stage organ failure highlights the urgent need for generating organs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Despite many reports describing functional cell differentiation, no studies have succeeded in generating a three-dimensional vascularized organ such as liver. Here we show the g...
Article
Full-text available
Background Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can differentiate into any cell type, which makes them an attractive resource in fields such as regenerative medicine, drug screening, or in vitro toxicology. The most important prerequisite for these industrial applications is stable supply and uniform quality of iPS cells. Variation in quality large...
Article
Background: The liver is an essential organ that maintains vital activity through its numerous important functions. It has a unique capability of fully regenerating after injury. Regulating a balance between self-renewal and differentiation of hepatic stem cells that are resources for functional mature liver cells is required for maintenance of ti...

Network

Cited By