Hiroaki Misonou

Hiroaki Misonou
Doshisha University · Graduate School of Brain Science

PhD, Professor

About

54
Publications
6,559
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
3,796
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
1183 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Introduction
Neurobiologist interested in ion channel regulation, protein trafficking, and related diseases.
Additional affiliations
November 2011 - present
Doshisha University
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Neurobiology of ion channels
September 2006 - October 2011
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • Neurobiology of ion channels
July 2003 - August 2006
University of California, Davis
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Ion channel trafficking
Education
April 2005 - March 2008
Sophia University
Field of study
  • Neurochemistry
April 1993 - March 1995
Sophia University
Field of study
  • Neurochemistry
April 1989 - March 1993
Sophia University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Full-text available
Tau is abundantly expressed in neurons, however previous reports and our recent study showed tau also exist in oligodendrocytes. Also the expression levels of tau are dramatical changed in hypomyelination model rat and in demyelination region of stroke model mice. The review demonstrate microtubule and its binding partner Tau might be necessary for...
Article
Neurofibrillary tangles, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), are somatodendritic filamentous inclusions composed of hyperphosphorylated tau. Microtubule loss is also a common feature of affected neurons in AD. However, whether and how the disruptions of microtubules and the microtubule-associated proteins occur in the pathogenesis...
Article
Tau is a microtubule (MT)-associated protein, which is thought to be localized to the axon. However, its precise localization in developing neurons and mechanisms for the axonal localization have not been fully addressed. In this study, we found that the axonal localization of tau in cultured rat hippocampal neurons mainly occur during early neuron...
Article
Full-text available
Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that is localized to the axon. In Alzheimer’s disease, the distribution of tau undergoes a remarkable alteration, leading to the formation of tau inclusions in the somatodendritic compartment. To investigate how this mis-localization occurs, we recently developed immunohistochemical tools that can separately...
Article
Full-text available
The cover image is based on the Research Article Distribution of endogenous normal tau in the mouse brain Atsuko Kubo et al., DOI: 10.1002/cne.24577.
Article
Full-text available
Tau is a microtubule‐associated protein (MAP) that is localized to the axon. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the distribution of tau undergoes a remarkable alteration, leading to the formation of tau inclusions in the somatodendritic compartment. While the abnormal aggregated tau has been extensively studied in human patient tissues and animal models...
Preprint
Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that is localized to the axon. In Alzheimer’s disease, the distribution of tau undergoes a remarkable alteration, leading to the formation of tau inclusions in the somatodendritic compartment. To investigate how this mis-localization occurs, we recently developed immunohistochemical techniques that can separa...
Preprint
Tau is a microtubule (MT)-associated protein, which precisely localizes to the axon of a mature neuron. Although it has been widely used as an axonal marker, the mechanisms for its axonal localization have been elusive. This might be largely due to the lack of an experimental system, as exogenously expressed tau, such as GFP-tau, mis-localizes to t...
Article
Full-text available
Perineuronal nets (PNNs), composed mainly of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, are the extracellular matrix that surrounds cell bodies, proximal dendrites, and axon initial segments of adult CNS neurons. PNNs are known to regulate neuronal plasticity, although their physiological roles in cerebellar functions have yet to be elucidated. Here, we in...
Article
Perineuronal nets (PNNs), composed mainly of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), are the extracellular matrix that surrounds cell bodies, proximal dendrites, and axon initial segments of adult CNS neurons. PNNs are known to regulate neuronal plasticity, although their physiological roles in cerebellar functions have yet to be elucidated. Her...
Article
Neurons are extremely large and complex cells, and they regulate membrane potentials in multiple subcellular compartments using a variety of ion channels. Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and potassium (Kv) channels are crucial in regulating neuronal membrane excitability owing to their diversity in subtypes, biophysical properties, and localizations. In...
Article
Full-text available
Kv2.1 is a major delayed-rectifier voltage-gated potassium channel widely expressed in neurons of the CNS. Kv2.1 localizes in high-density cell-surface clusters in the soma and proximal dendrites as well as in the axon initial segment (AIS). Given the crucial roles of both of these compartments in integrating signal input and then generating output...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: The Kv2 family of voltage-gated potassium channel α subunits, comprising Kv2.1 and Kv2.2, mediate the bulk of the neuronal delayed rectifier K(+) current in many mammalian central neurons. Kv2.1 exhibits robust expression across many neuron types and is unique in its conditional role in modulating intrinsic excitability through changes...
Article
Full-text available
In myelinated axons, K+ channels are clustered in distinct membrane domains to regulate action potentials (APs). At nodes of Ranvier, Kv7 channels are expressed with Na+ channels, whereas Kv1 channels flank nodes at juxtaparanodes. Regulation of axonal APs by K+ channels would be particularly important in fast-spiking projection neurons such as cer...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying cellular signaling pathways that become corrupted in the presence of androgens that increase the metastatic potential of organ-confined tumor cells is critical to devising strategies capable of attenuating the metastatic progression of hormone-naïve, organ-confined tumors. In localized prostate cancers, gene fusions that place ETS-famil...
Article
Full-text available
The subcellular localization of neuronal membrane signaling molecules such as receptors and ion channels depends on intracellular trafficking mechanisms. Essentially, vesicular trafficking mechanisms ensure that a large number of membrane proteins are correctly targeted to different subcellular compartments of neurons. In the past two decades, the...
Article
Full-text available
Proper membrane localization of ion channels is essential for the function of neuronal cells. Particularly, the computational ability of dendrites depends on the localization of different ion channels in specific subcompartments. However, the molecular mechanisms that control ion channel localization in distinct dendritic subcompartments are largel...
Article
Full-text available
Study objectives: The basal forebrain (BF) has been implicated as an important brain region that regulates the sleep-wake cycle of animals. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) neurons are the most predominant neuronal population within this region. However, due to the lack of specific molecular tools, the roles of the BF GABAergic neurons hav...
Article
Full-text available
The computational ability of CNS neurons depends critically on the specific localization of ion channels in the somatodendritic and axonal membranes. Neuronal dendrites receive synaptic inputs at numerous spines and integrate them in time and space. The integration of synaptic potentials is regulated by voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, such a...
Article
The Kv2 voltage-gated potassium channels, Kv2.1 and Kv2.2, are important regulators of neuronal excitability in mammalian brain. It has been shown that Kv2.1 channels are expressed in virtually all neurons in the brain. However, the cellular localization of Kv2.2 has not been fully elucidated. In this article we report that Kv2.2 is highly expresse...
Article
Full-text available
The formation of heteromeric tetramers is a common feature of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. This results in the generation of a variety of tetrameric Kv channels that exhibit distinct biophysical and biochemical characteristics. Kv2 delayed rectifier channels are, however, unique exceptions. It has been previously shown that mammalian Kv2....
Article
Full-text available
K(+)-selective ion channels are critical determinants of membrane excitability in neuronal cells. Like many other cells in our body, neuronal cells have a propensity to maintain their homeostasis. Action potential firing is the most important function to maintain in brain neurons, as they are the elements of neural networks. If one element fires ac...
Chapter
K+-selective ion channels are important determinants of neuronal excitability. The activity of three particular K+ channels, Kir6.2, Slo1, and Kv2.1, is implicated in neuroprotection of ischemic brain neurons. Here we review recent studies on the molecular properties, expression, and function of these neuronal K+ channels, their regulation in ische...
Article
Full-text available
KV2.1 is the prominent somatodendritic sustained or delayed rectifier voltage-gated potassium (KV) channel in mammalian central neurons, and is a target for activity-dependent modulation via calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation. Using hanatoxin-mediated block of KV2.1 we show that, in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, glutamate stimulation leads...
Article
Full-text available
The physiological significance of neuroglial interactions in the CNS has been emphasized in neurological conditions such as epilepsy and brain ischemia. The Kv2.1 voltage-gated potassium channel is unique in its ability to form large clusters in the plasma membrane of neuronal cell bodies. We have previously shown that brain ischemia causes rapid d...
Article
Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are important and diverse determinants of neuronal excitability and exhibit specific expression patterns throughout the brain. Among Kv channels, Kv4 channels are major determinants of somatodendritic A-type current and are essential in controlling the amplitude of backpropagating action potentials (BAPs) into...
Chapter
Mammalian central neurons express a large number of different voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channel complexes with diverse patterns of cellular expression and subcellular localization that impact their contribution to regulating cell excitability. This chapter reviews the mechanisms regulating intracellular trafficking and localization of Kv channels i...
Article
Full-text available
The potassium channel subunits KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 are believed to underlie the M current of hippocampal neurons. The M-type potassium current plays a key role in the regulation of neuronal excitability; however, the subcellular location of the ion channels underlying this regulation has been controversial. We report here that KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 subunits...
Article
Full-text available
Modulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel surface expression can profoundly affect neuronal excitability. Some, but not all, mammalian Shaker or Kv1 alpha subunits contain a dominant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal in their pore region, preventing surface expression of Kv1.1 homotetrameric channels and of heteromeric Kv1 channe...
Article
Full-text available
Activity-dependent dephosphorylation of neuronal Kv2.1 channels yields hyperpolarizing shifts in their voltage-dependent activation and homoeostatic suppression of neuronal excitability. We recently identified 16 phosphorylation sites that modulate Kv2.1 function. Here, we show that in mammalian neurons, compared with other regulated sites, such as...
Article
Full-text available
The intrinsic properties of a neuron determine the translation of synaptic input to axonal output. It is this input– output relationship that is the heart of all nervous system activity. As such, the overall regulation of the intrinsic excitability of a neuron directly determines the output of that neuron at a given point in time, giving the cell a...
Article
Full-text available
Dynamic modulation of ion channels by phosphorylation underlies neuronal plasticity. The Kv2.1 potassium channel is highly phosphorylated in resting mammalian neurons. Activity-dependent Kv2.1 dephosphorylation by calcineurin induces graded hyperpolarizing shifts in voltage-dependent activation, causing suppression of neuronal excitability. Mass sp...
Article
Ca(2+)-activated voltage-dependent K(+) channels (Slo1, KCa1.1, Maxi-K, or BK channel) play a crucial role in controlling neuronal signaling by coupling channel activity to both membrane depolarization and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. In mammalian brain, immunolabeling experiments have shown staining for Slo1 channels predominantly localized to...
Article
Full-text available
Ischemic stroke is often accompanied by neuronal hyperexcitability (i.e., seizures), which aggravates brain damage. Therefore, suppressing stroke-induced hyperexcitability and associated excitoxicity is a major focus of treatment for ischemic insults. Both ATP-dependent and Ca2+-activated K+ channels have been implicated in protective mechanisms to...
Article
Full-text available
Neurons use a variety of mechanisms to dynamically control their own signaling capabilities. Regulation of voltage-dependent K+ channel localization and function has long been recognized as a major mechanism to achieve dynamic regulation of intrinsic neuronal excitability in a number of mammalian and non-mammalian neurons. Our recent evidence, toge...
Article
Full-text available
Low-density cultures of embryonic rat hippocampal neurons have been widely used to investigate localization and function of neuronal proteins using immunocytochemistry and electrophysiology. These cultures provide a relatively homogeneous population of hippocampal pyramidal neurons and interneurons compared to post-natal mixed neuron/glial cultures...
Article
Full-text available
Voltage-dependent Kv2.1 K(+) channels, which mediate delayed rectifier Kv currents (I(K)), are expressed in large clusters on the somata and dendrites of principal pyramidal neurons, where they regulate neuronal excitability. Here we report activity-dependent changes in the localization and biophysical properties of Kv2.1. In the kainate model of c...
Article
Neurons strictly regulate expression of a wide variety of voltage-dependent ion channels in their surface membranes to achieve precise yet dynamic control of intrinsic membrane excitability. Neurons also exhibit extreme morphological complexity that underlies diverse aspects of their function. Most ion channels are preferentially targeted to either...
Article
Full-text available
Cholesterol has been claimed to be involved in the generation and/or accumulation of amyloid beta protein (Abeta). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated yet. Here, we have investigated the effect of membrane cholesterol content on gamma-secretase activity using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing beta...
Article
Full-text available
Kv4 potassium channels regulate action potentials in neurons and cardiac myocytes. Co-expression of EF hand-containing Ca2+-binding proteins termed KChIPs with pore-forming Kv4 α subunits causes changes in the gating and amplitude of Kv4 currents (An, W. F., Bowlby, M. R., Betty, M., Cao, J., Ling, H. P., Mendoza, G., Hinson, J. W., Mattsson, K. I....
Article
Full-text available
A novel cleavage of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP), referred to as epsilon-cleavage, occurs downstream of the gamma-cleavage and generates predominantly a C-terminal fragment (CTFgamma) that begins at Val-50, according to amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) numbering. Whether this cleavage occurs independently of, or is coordinated with, gamma-cleav...
Article
Full-text available
A novel cleavage of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), referred to as ϵ-cleavage, occurs downstream of the γ-cleavage and generates predominantly a C-terminal fragment (CTFγ) that begins at Val-50, according to amyloid β-protein (Aβ) numbering. Whether this cleavage occurs independently of, or is coordinated with, γ-cleavage is unknown. Using a cel...
Article
Full-text available
The intramembrane cleavage of β-amyloid precursor protein by γ-secretase is the final step in the generation of amyloid β-protein. A 59- or 57-residue C-terminal fragment called CTFγ is produced concomitantly. Putative CTFγ generated in rat brain membrane preparations was purified and sequenced. Instead of CTFγ, shorter 50- and 49-residue fragments...
Article
Full-text available
Several lines of evidence suggest that enhanced oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis and/or progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) that composes senile plaques, a major neuropathological hallmark of AD, is considered to have a causal role in AD. Thus, we have studied the effect of oxidative stress on Abeta...
Article
Full-text available
Several lines of evidence suggest that enhanced oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis and/or progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta-protein (A beta) that composes senile plaques, a major neuropathological hallmark of AD, is considered to have a causal role in AD. Thus, we have studied the effect of oxidative stress on A be...
Article
Full-text available
1. To investigate the mechanism whereby protein kinase C enhances secretory function in adrenal chromaffin cells, we examined the effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbor-13-acetate (TPA) on Ca2+-induced catecholamine release from digitonin-permeabilized cells, resolving the release into a MgATP-dependent priming step and a MgATP-indepen-dent Ca2+-trig...
Article
Full-text available
The MgATP-dependent priming step of exocytosis has been suggested to be regulated negatively by GTP-binding protein G0 in permeabilized adrenal chromaffin cells. We have reported that synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) and vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) form a complex in chromaffin cells, and the complex dissociates...
Article
Full-text available
Synaptotagmin that contains two repeats of C2 regulatory domains is considered to be involved in neurotransmitter release. To reveal the roles of synaptotagmin in the regulation of exocytosis, we examined the effects of antibodies against C2A and C2B domains on Ca2+-evoked catecholamine (CA) release from digitonin-permeabilized adrenal chromaffin c...
Article
Full-text available
In digitonin-permeabilized adrenal chromaffin cells, Ca(2+)-induced catecholamine release can be resolved into at least two sequential steps: a MgATP-dependent priming step and a MgATP-independent Ca(2+)-triggered step. Botulinum neurotoxins types A and E cleaved SNAP-25, and blocked MgATP-independent Ca(2+)-induced catecholamine release from the p...
Article
Full-text available
Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis in chromaffin cells now seems to consist of at least two distinct steps:MgATP-dependent Ca(2+)-dependent priming of the secretory apparatus, and Ca(2+)-dependent MgATP-independent step that triggers exocytosis (Bittner and Holz, 1992). Recently we found that a specific inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), wortman...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Studying how ion channels are regulated and how that impact the function of neurons.
Project
To understand how tau localized to the axon in normal and mislocalize to the soma in Alzheimer's disease.