Himanshu Grover

Himanshu Grover
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Department of Urban Design & Planning

About

35
Publications
7,055
Reads
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2,386
Citations
Citations since 2016
3 Research Items
1438 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
This study examines the prediction of three types of household flood hazard adjustment (emergency preparedness, structural mitigation, and nonstructural mitigation) by a comprehensive set of risk perception variables (expected personal consequences, affective response, hazard intrusive thoughts, and hazard intrusive discussions). These risk percept...
Article
Public perceptions of risk from climate change are an important determinant of the willingness of citizens to support climate change mitigation and adaptation policies. Although there is a growing body of research focusing on a variety of individual, cultural, and organisational factors that affect an individual's perception of risk, only a few stu...
Article
The footprint left by development in the Great Lakes–St. Lawrence River basin is fundamentally linked to the size, structure, and distribution of the human population across the region. Regional demographic conditions and trends over time provide insight into both why the basin looks as it does today and how it might change in the future. We presen...
Chapter
Our findings with respect to hazard mitigation planning were somewhat discouraging but not completely unexpected given the literature. The basic patterns we saw in Texas were similar to those found in the variety of states examined by Lyles, Berke, and Smith. Hazard mitigation plans are complying with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) guid...
Chapter
Consistency, in a person, is defined as “the quality or fact of staying the same at different times.” This implies that various dimensions of a person such as thought, behavior, feelings, reason, and will are consistent with one another over time. This does not necessarily guarantee consistent outcomes, but it is compatible with opinions and values...
Chapter
Disasters occur when physical and social systems interact with natural or technological hazards. The characteristics of the hazard itself are typically the most significant determinants of damage and loss. For example, in our work in Galveston, the exposure to storm surge (proximity to the bay side of the island) was the most important predictor of...
Chapter
Decades of disaster research have clearly established that comprehensive proactive planning is the best way to minimize and avoid hazard losses. In his seminal work, Dennis Mileti states that a disaster is a symptom of broad and basic problems of unsustainable growth and development. We can reduce vulnerabilities and increase resilience by incorpor...
Chapter
In recent years, we have seen the terrifying impacts of natural disasters, including Hurricane Katrina, the Wenchuan and Kobe earthquakes, the Fukushima tsunami and nuclear disaster, and, most recently, 2012’s Hurricane Sandy. Globally, the average annual number of natural disasters reported has more than doubled since 1980., These catastrophes are...
Chapter
A critical piece, and often the most neglected piece, of resilience to disaster is the identification and mapping of a community’s social vulnerabilities. When disaster strikes, its impact is not just a function of its magnitude and where it strikes. Development patterns characterized by sprawl, concentrated poverty, and segregation shape urban env...
Chapter
To begin tackling the problem of increased vulnerability to natural disasters, we must understand what we are trying to achieve. In recent years, the term resilience has gained popularity, but it is used in widely varying ways. All communities should strive for resilience, but what does it mean? Resilience has different definitions arising from a r...
Chapter
With the previous chapter’s definitions of resilience and community capital assets in hand, we now turn to a broad conceptualization of the disaster management phases. Actions taken to build resilience in a community can occur at any of the four phases of disaster management: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.
Chapter
This chapter introduces and discusses hazard mitigation planning and plans as a critical step in mobilizing a community to increase disaster resiliency. Hazard mitigation plans are in many respects a recent policy tool. Introduced by the federal government, hazard mitigation plans are an approach to help communities better understand their disaster...
Chapter
The fact basis for both hazard mitigation and comprehensive planning has long been based on hazard exposure and physical or structural vulnerability. As discussed in chapter 4, hazard exposure is a function of the nature of the hazard agent and its potential to affect the geography of urban areas captured in risk maps. Physical or structural vulner...
Book
How can we plan and design stronger communities? From New Orleans to Galveston to the Jersey Shore, communities struck by natural disasters struggle to recover long after the first responders have left. Globally, the average annual number of natural disasters has more than doubled since 1980. These catastrophes are increasing in number as well as i...
Article
Climate change presents a fundamental challenge to sustainable growth and development of urban centers. Urban areas not only concentrate activities that contribute to climate change but are also at increasing risk from the anticipated impacts. Human activities primarily associated with urban development patterns and consumptive lifestyles impact ec...
Article
Social factors influence the ability of coastal communities and their populations to anticipate, respond, resist, and recover from disasters. Galveston, TX, offers aunique opportunity to test the efficacy of social vulnerability mapping to identify inequalities in the ways that different parts of the community may react to a disaster. We describe s...
Chapter
Full-text available
Disasters like Hurricane Ike, as well as severe storms such as Allison, Katrina, and Rita are often referred to as "natural" disasters. Rather than being wholly "natural," however, these disasters result from the interaction among biophysical systems, human systems, and their built environment. Indeed, the emerging scientific consensus states that...
Article
Despite the increasing interest in climate change policy in the US, little systematic research has been conducted on the willingness of individuals to change their behaviour to mitigate the problem. Understanding behavioural change is critical if federal and local governments intend to implement programmes requiring actions to mitigate and adapt to...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report provides details of work undertaken in Phase 3 of the Status and Trends of Coastal Vulnerability to Natural Hazards Project exploring changing vulnerabilities and overall resilience of Texas Coastal Counties associated with the Texas Coastal Management Zone. In addition to updates on the Texas Sustainable Coastal Initiative and the Texa...
Article
Climate change has become a more salient issue on the US policy agenda at all levels of government. Increasing empirical evidence and identification of its potential risks to human populations have increased media, public, and policy-maker interest. There is a gap, however, in our knowledge of sub-national decision-making which suggests several que...
Article
This paper offers a potential measurement solution for assessing disaster impacts and subsequent recovery at the household level by using a modified domestic assets index (MDAI) approach. Assessment of the utility of the domestic assets index first proposed by Bates, Killian and Peacock (1984) has been confined to earthquake areas in the Americas a...
Article
Full-text available
Although there is a growing body of research examining public perceptions of global climate change, little work has focused on the role of place and proximity in shaping these perceptions. This study extends previous conceptual models explaining risk perception associated with global climate change by adding a spatial dimension. Specifically, Geogr...
Article
This study examines the factors motivating local jurisdictions in the United States (U.S.) to voluntarily adopt policies that mitigate the anthropogenic sources of climate change when there are powerful political and economic incentives to do otherwise. Specifically, we explain adoption of the Cities for Climate Protection (CCP) program at the coun...
Article
Full-text available
We examine the reasons why a US locality would voluntarily commit to the Cities for Climate Protection (CCP) campaign. Using geographic information systems analytic techniques, we map and measure a locality’s vulnerability to climate-change impacts at the county level of spatial precision. We analyze multiple measures of climate-change vulnerabilit...
Article
Studies on the impacts of hurricanes, tropical storms, and tornados indicate that poor communities of colour suffer disproportionately in human death and injury.(2) Few quantitative studies have been conducted on the degree to which flood events affect socially vulnerable populations. We address this research void by analysing 832 countywide flood...
Article
Floods continue to pose the greatest threat to the property and safety of human communities among all natural hazards in the United States. This study examines the relationship between the built environment and flood impacts in Texas, which consistently sustains the most damage from flooding of any other state in the country. Specifically, we calcu...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and mitigation policies adopted by a locality indelibly impact urban form, landscape, and economy. The Cities for Climate Protection (CCP) has become a dominant movement organizing the localities to proactively address climate change. This study examines metropolitan area commitment to the CCP. Geographic information systems (GIS) an...
Article
The rising economic cost of floods in the United States cannot be explained solely by monetary inflation or growth in coastal populations. Damaging flood events are also influenced by the way society plans for and physically develops its communities, influencing where structures and impervious surfaces are concentrated and how hydrological systems...
Article
Full-text available
Recent interest in expanding offshore oil production within waters of the United States has been met with opposition by groups concerned with recreational, environmental, and aesthetic values associated with the coastal zone. Although the proposition of new oil platforms off the coast has generated conflict over how coastal resources should be util...
Article
Climate scientists note that the effects of climate change vary regionally. Citizen willingness to absorb the costs of adaptation and mitigation policies may correspond with these place-specific effects. Geographic information systems (GIS) analytic techniques are used to map and measure survey respondents' climate change risk at various levels of...
Article
Full-text available
A field study team interviewed local government officials, community-based organizations, and nongovernmental organizations to assess community capacity and emergency response to the tsunami. In addition, 1,000 households on the Nagapattinam coast were randomly surveyed to assess household capacity and disaster response. The results presented here...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the factors motivating local jurisdictions in the United States (U.S.) to voluntarily adopt policies that mitigate the anthropogenic sources of climate change when there are powerful political and economic incentives to do otherwise. Specifically, we explain adoption of the Cities for Climate Protection (CCP) program at the coun...
Article
2 Few quantitative studies have been conducted on the degree to which flood events affect socially vulnerable populations. We address this research void by analysing 832 countywide flood events in Texas from 1997-2001. Specifically, we examine whether geographic localities characterised by high percentages of socially vulnerable populations experie...
Article
In the last couple of decades, there has been increasing evidence of changes in global climate. With urban areas identified as the primary contributors to the climate change, there is an impetus for initiatives to persuade major contributors of greenhouse gases to undertake policy measures for climate change mitigation. The support for such initiat...

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