Hilary Boudet

Hilary Boudet
Oregon State University | OSU · School of Public Policy

PhD, Stanford University

About

56
Publications
9,441
Reads
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2,160
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - present
Oregon State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Extreme weather events are expected to increase in frequency and severity due to climate change. However, we lack an understanding of how recent extreme weather events have impacted the U.S. population. We surveyed a representative sample of the U.S. public (n = 1071) in September 2021 about self-reported impacts they experienced from six types of...
Article
Full-text available
Food systems, including production, acquisition, preparation, and consumption, feature importantly in environmental sustainability, energy consumption and climate change. With predicted increases in food and water shortages associated with climate change, food-related lifestyle and behavioral changes are advocated as important mitigation and adapta...
Article
As emergency managers and other government and nongovernmental organizations in the United States cope with a variety of catastrophic events, including unprecedented natural disasters and a global pandemic, the role of government trust in responding to and addressing the threat from such events has gained attention among policy and public administr...
Article
The drastic increase in domestic production of natural gas due to the fracking boom prompted efforts to develop a robust infrastructure in the U.S. to export natural gas. Given environmental concerns over increased fossil fuel development, significant opposition mobilized to “keep it [fossil fuels] in the ground” by acting to prevent not only natur...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how the COVID-19 pandemic has altered electricity consumption can provide insights into society's responses to future shocks and other extreme events. We quantify changes in electricity consumption in 58 different countries/regions around the world from January-October 2020, and examine how those changes relate to government restricti...
Article
Exposure to extreme weather — the frequency and severity of which has been linked to the climate crisis — has been posited to yield local climate change mitigation and adaptation policy. Here, we outline lessons from a nascent, but growing, literature focused on local policymaking in the wake of extreme weather events. Recent research shows that ex...
Article
As wildfire risk in the western U.S. grows due to climate change, the frequency and duration of public safety power shutoffs (PSPSs) are expected to increase. Surveying California residents (n = 804), we identify four respondent groupings based on PSPS experience and concern about future power outages. We find that those with higher levels of exper...
Article
Understanding support for or opposition to energy developments — and how it varies with proximity — is important for effective planning. A new study using public comments on a regulatory review casts further light on the geography of discourse and how it might shape action on siting energy technology.
Article
en The climate crisis and associated push for distributed, renewable electricity generation necessitate policy changes to decarbonize and modernize the electricity grid. Some of these changes—e.g., smart meter rollouts and tax credits for solar panel adoption—have received attention in the media and from social scientists to understand public perce...
Article
A fierce debate is raging about the role of natural gas in North America’s energy mix. Once viewed as a bridge fuel for renewable energy, it is increasingly being characterized as hindering the energy transition. We explore public opinions about natural gas, its use and export, among residents in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. While many...
Preprint
Full-text available
As local governments in the United States cope with a variety of catastrophic events, public administration and policy scholars have turned their attention to understanding the role of government trust in the public's response to such events. Recent evidence suggests that experiencing climate-related events, like extreme weather events, may impact...
Article
Full-text available
At a global level, climate change is expected to result in more frequent and higher-intensity weather events, with impacts ranging from inconvenient to catastrophic. The potential for disasters to act as “focusing events” for policy change, including adaptation to climate change risk, is well known. Moreover, local action is an important element of...
Article
To contain the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), local and state governments in the U.S. have imposed restrictions on daily life, resulting in dramatic changes to how and where people interact, travel, socialize, and work. Using a social practice perspective, we explore how California's Shelter-in-Place (SIP) order impacted household ener...
Article
The success of time-of-use (TOU) pricing, where consumers are charged higher rates during peak usage windows, depends on consumer flexibility—an assumption that may not be true for all households or activities. We draw on concepts from social practice theory to explore the flexibility of residential electricity consumption, examining both household...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding how efforts to limit exposure to COVID-19 have altered electricity demand provides insights not only into how dramatic restrictions shape electricity demand but also about future electricity use in a post-COVID-19 world. We develop a unified modeling framework to quantify and compare electricity usage changes in 58 countries and regio...
Article
Full-text available
Much research exists on how social-psychological factors (e.g. political ideology), proximity to development, and contextual factors (e.g. state in which one resides) drive public attitudes toward various types of energy development. Yet, scholars have only recently begun to explore how these factors interact to create unique geographies of percept...
Article
Full-text available
The U.S. and Canada continue to face major changes in energy production. Mounting awareness of the climate crisis has placed increasing importance on developing renewable energy sources, however, advances in fossil fuel extraction technology have opened vast domestic reserves of oil and natural gas. Public preferences for energy policy play a role...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme weather events may provide opportunities to raise public awareness and spur action to address climate change. Using concepts from the study of social movements, we conducted a systematic comparative-case analysis of 15 communities that experienced extreme weather events in the United States between 2012 and 2015 to identify under what condi...
Article
Full-text available
Shifts in natural gas supply and demand since the early 2000s have triggered proposals for import and export terminals in coastal locations around the United States. Demand for such facilities is likely to grow with increasing rates of natural gas exports. Clatsop County, Oregon, is one such location that experienced over 10 years of debate surroun...
Article
A growing body of research examines the role of extreme weather experience—as one of the most personal, visceral (and increasingly frequent and severe) impacts of climate change—in shaping views on climate change. A remaining question is whether the experience of an extreme weather event increases climate change concern via experiential learning or...
Article
Recent research suggests that those located closer to energy development are, on average, more supportive of this development. However, case studies in specific locations reveal additional nuance. In a case study of Bakken Shale residents, Junod et al. identified a “Goldilocks Zone” of unconventional oil and gas development (UOGD) acceptance—an are...
Article
Energy’s central place in economic, political and social systems—and the broad impacts that energy choices have on the natural world and public health—mean that new technologies often spur public reactions. Understanding these public responses and their drivers is important, as public support can influence new technology adoption and deployment. He...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Prior work has demonstrated that energy education programs designed for young children can influence the adoption of energy efficiency measures in the home. Here, we introduce the Know Your Energy Numbers (KYEN) program, an energy education program designed to teach an older audience of pre-teens, or tweens, about: (i) their energy consumption life...
Article
Full-text available
The U.S. is now the global leader in natural gas production. The federal government is changing policies and priorities to expand natural gas export to foreign energy markets. Such an expansion requires increased pipeline capacity and the development of export terminals for shipping. While natural gas export is a burgeoning energy and environmental...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in event attribution have improved scientific confidence in linking climate change to extreme weather severity and frequency, but this confidence varies by event type. Yet, scholars and activists argue that extreme weather events may provide the best opportunity to raise awareness and prompt action on climate change. We focus on four cases...
Article
Much of the literature on local opposition to wind development is based on small-N case studies of controversial cases. This focus has led to an emphasis on the so-called “social gap” between positive general attitudes toward renewable energy development and local resistance to actual proposals. Instead, we conduct a fuzzy set/Qualitative Comparati...
Article
Scholars and activists alike contend that extreme weather events may provide the best opportunity for raising public awareness and perhaps even instigating action related to climate change. We explore whether the September 2013 floods were associated with local climate change beliefs and actions after the event via an in-depth case study in Boulder...
Article
With the rapid growth of unconventional oil and natural gas development transforming the U.S. economic and physical landscape, social scientists have increasingly explored the spatial dynamics of public support for this issue—that is, whether people closer to unconventional oil and gas development are more supportive or more opposed. While theoreti...
Article
A growing area of research has addressed public perception of unconventional oil and natural gas development via hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”). We extend this research by examining how geographic proximity to such extraction interacts with political ideology to influence issue support. Regression analysis of data from a fall 2013 national telep...
Article
Energy education programmes for children are hypothesized to have great potential to save energy. Such interventions are often assumed to impact child and family behaviours. Here, using a cluster-randomized controlled trial with 30 Girl Scout troops in Northern California, we assess the efficacy of two social cognitive theory-based interventions fo...
Article
Full-text available
Research suggests that previous, current, and prospective extractive industry activities influence perceptions of new development. Studies that have drawn this conclusion, however, have usually focused on specific projects in specific communities. Here, these factors are examined on an aggregate, national scale. Combining geospatial data on extract...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change will increase the frequency and/or intensity of certain extreme weather events, and perceived experience with extreme weather may influence climate change beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. However, the aspects of extreme events that influence whether or not people perceive that they have personally experienced them remain unclear. W...
Article
Climate change is likely the most critical societal challenge to the futures of today׳s children. Mitigation will require a concerted effort to change household energy behaviour—electricity use, transportation and food consumption patterns. A first step to changing behaviour is to better understand current behaviour and its intrapersonal (knowledge...
Article
Social movement theory has rarely been tested with counterfactual cases, that is, instances in which movements do not emerge. Moreover, contemporary theories about political opportunity and resources often inadequately address the issue of motivation. To address these shortcomings, this article examines 20 communities that are “at risk” for mobiliz...
Technical Report
In this report, we use a nationally representative sample of Americans (N=1,061) to examine public perceptions of fracking. Questions on fracking were included as part of a national survey–Climate Change in the American Mind–conducted by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and the Mason University Center for Climate Change Communicatio...
Book
The field of social movement studies has expanded dramatically over the past three decades. But as it has done so, its focus has become increasingly narrow and 'movement-centric'. When combined with the tendency to select successful struggles for study, the conceptual and methodological conventions of the field conduce to a decidedly Ptolemaic view...
Article
Full-text available
Only sometimes do environmental protests that begin as not-in-mybackyard (NIMBY) objections to proposed facilities become translated into more universal not-in-anyone’s-backyard (NIABY) mobilizations. An examination of opposition to liquefied natural gas (LNG) receiving terminals in the United States shows evidence of regional mobilization in the G...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the considerable scholarship focused on infrastructure investment in the developing world and the substantial sums of money spent each year on developing-country infrastructure, little attention has been given to understanding the drivers of conflict that shape the trajectory and cost structures of these massive investments. The manifestati...
Article
Full-text available
The siting of large industrial facilities represents a difficult planning problem. Despite decades of experience and research on siting, many of the same patterns of conflict persist. We focus on four factors drawn largely from the study of social movements—threat, political opportunity, resources and appropriation, and loss of trust—to explain the...
Article
Fifty years ago, the main challenges to large infrastructure projects were technical or scientific. Today, the greatest hurdles faced by such projects are almost always social and/or political. Whether constructing large dams in the developing world or siting liquefied natural gas terminals in the United States, the onset of these projects often tr...

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