Hervé Sauquet

Hervé Sauquet
Royal Botanic Gardens · National Herbarium of New South Wales

PhD

About

109
Publications
56,361
Reads
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3,673
Citations
Introduction
​I am an evolutionary biologist and botanist with a broad interest in macroevolution. A key focus of my current and future research is to unravel and better understand large-scale patterns in the evolution of flowers.
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust
Position
  • Senior Researcher
September 2009 - August 2017
Université Paris-Sud 11
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 2008 - August 2009
Université Pierre et Marie Curie
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
September 1999 - June 2003
Université Pierre et Marie Curie
Field of study
  • Evolutionary biology

Publications

Publications (109)
Article
Full-text available
Recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and a series of important palaeobotanical discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of angiosperm diversification. Yet, the origin and early evolution of their most characteristic feature, the flower, remains poorly understood. In particular, the structure of the ancestral flower of all living angi...
Article
Full-text available
Contents Summary I. Introduction II. Six key questions III. Three key challenges IV. Conclusions Acknowledgements References SUMMARY: The origin and rapid diversification of angiosperms (flowering plants) represent one of the most intriguing topics in evolutionary biology. Despite considerable progress made in complementary fields over the last two...
Article
Full-text available
The Early Cretaceous (145–100 million years ago (Ma)) witnessed the rise of flowering plants (angiosperms), which ultimately lead to profound changes in terrestrial plant communities. However, palaeobotanical evidence shows that the transition to widespread angiosperm-dominated biomes was delayed until the Palaeocene (66–56 Ma). Important aspects o...
Article
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Biodiversity today has the unusual property that 85% of plants and animal species live on land rather than in the sea, and half of these in tropical rainforests. An explosive boost to terrestrial diversity occurred from ca. 100–50 million years ago, the Late Cretaceous and early Palaeogene. During this interval, the Earth‐life system on land was re...
Article
Full-text available
The origin of flowering plants (angiosperms) was one of the most transformative events in the history of our planet. Despite considerable interest from multiple research fields, numerous questions remain, including the age of the group as a whole. Recent studies have reported a perplexing range of estimates for the crown-group age of angiosperms, f...
Preprint
Full-text available
Determining the link between genomic and phenotypic evolution is a fundamental goal in evolutionary biology. Insights into this link can be gained by using a phylogenetic approach to test for correlations between rates of molecular and morphological evolution. However, there has been persistent uncertainty about the relationship between these rates...
Preprint
Full-text available
Variation in species richness across the tree of life, accompanied by the incredible variety of ecological and morphological characteristics found in nature, has inspired many studies to link traits with species diversification. Angiosperms are a highly diverse group that has fundamentally shaped life on earth since the Cretaceous, and illustrate h...
Article
Full-text available
Climate shapes the composition and function of plant communities globally, but it remains unclear how this influence extends to floral traits. Flowering phenology, or the time period in which a species flowers, has well‐studied relationships with climatic signals at the species level but has rarely been explored at a cross‐community and continental...
Article
Full-text available
The present-day ubiquity of angiosperm-insect pollination has led to the hypothesis that these two groups coevolved early in their evolutionary history. However, recent fossil discoveries and fossil-calibrated molecular dating analyses challenge the notion that early diversifications of angiosperms and insects were inextricably linked. In this arti...
Preprint
Full-text available
Fossil flowers are essential to infer past angiosperm evolutionary processes. The assignment of fossil flowers to extant clades has traditionally relied on morphological similarity and on apomorphies shared with extant taxa. The use of explicit phylogenetic analyses to establish their affinity has so far remained limited. In this study, we built a...
Article
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Premise: Pseudanthia are widespread and have long been postulated a key innovation responsible for some of the angiosperm radiations. The aim of our study was to analyze macroevolutionary patterns of these flower-like inflorescences and their potential correlation with diversification rates in Apiaceae subfamily Apioideae. In particular, we were i...
Preprint
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Background Telopea speciosissima , the New South Wales waratah, is Australian endemic woody shrub in the family Proteaceae. Waratahs have great potential as a model clade to better understand processes of speciation, introgression and adaptation, and are significant from a horticultural perspective. Findings Here, we report the first chromosome-le...
Preprint
Full-text available
The present-day ubiquity of angiosperm-insect pollination has led to the hypothesis that these two groups coevolved early in their evolutionary history. However, recent fossil discoveries and fossil-calibrated molecular dating analyses challenge the notion that early diversifications of angiosperms and insects were inextricably linked. In this arti...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim Climate shapes the composition and function of plant communities globally, but it remains unclear how this influence extends to floral traits. Flowering phenology, or the time period in which a species flowers, has well-studied relationships with climatic signals at the species level but has rarely been explored at a cross-community and contine...
Preprint
Full-text available
The origin of flowering plants (angiosperms) was one of the most transformative events in the history of our planet. Despite considerable interest from multiple research fields, numerous questions remain, including the age of the group as a whole. Recent studies have reported a perplexing range of estimates for the crown-group age of angiosperms, f...
Article
Full-text available
Estimating time-dependent rates of speciation and extinction from dated phylogenetic trees of extant species (timetrees), and determining how and why they vary, is key to understanding how ecological and evolutionary processes shape biodiversity. Due to an increasing availability of phylogenetic trees, a growing number of process-based methods rely...
Article
Full-text available
We introduce the AusTraits database - a compilation of values of plant traits for taxa in the Australian flora (hereafter AusTraits). AusTraits synthesises data on 448 traits across 28,640 taxa from field campaigns, published literature, taxonomic monographs, and individual taxon descriptions. Traits vary in scope from physiological measures of per...
Article
We present a phylogenomic study of Brosimum (Moraceae) and the allied genera Trymatococcus and Helianthostylis, with near-complete taxon sampling. Distributed from Mexico and the Greater Antilles to the Amazon, this clade contains the underutilized crop ramón (bread nut) (Brosimum alicastrum) as well as other species valued for timber or medicinal...
Article
Cleistogamous flowers never fully bloom and are thought to have evolved as a means to promote self-fertilisation. A new study reveals that this curious feature arose more frequently in flowers with bilateral symmetry.
Article
Full-text available
The flowering plant family Annonaceae includes important commercially grown tropical crops, but development of promising species is hindered by a lack of genomic resources to build breeding programs. Annonaceae are part of the magnoliids, an ancient lineage of angiosperms for which evolutionary relationships with other major clades remain unclear....
Article
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Morphological diversity (disparity) is an essential but often neglected aspect of biodiversity. Hence, it seems timely and promising to re‐emphasize morphology in modern evolutionary studies. Disparity is a good proxy for the diversity of functions and interactions with the environment of a group of taxa. In addition, geographical and ecological pa...
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract Estimating time-dependent rates of speciation and extinction from dated phylogenetic trees of extant species (timetrees), and determining how and why they vary is key to understanding how ecological and evolutionary processes shape biodiversity. Due to an increasing availability of phylogenies, a growing number of process-based methods re...
Article
Full-text available
Premise: Significant paleobotanical discoveries in recent decades have considerably improved our understanding of the early evolution of angiosperms and their flowers. However, our ability to test the systematic placement of fossil flowers on the basis of phylogenetic analyses has remained limited, mainly due to the lack of an adequate, angiosperm...
Article
Full-text available
The question of the origin of petals has long been debated in the botanical literature. Ranunculales are characterized by a spectacular floral diversity, particularly at the perianth level. Recent progress in understanding the genetic bases of floral organ identity suggests a single origin for petals in Ranunculaceae, contrasting with the tradition...
Preprint
Full-text available
We present a phylogenomic study of Brosimum and the allied genera Trymatococcus and Helianthostylis, with near-complete taxon sampling. Distributed from Mexico and the Greater Antilles to the Amazon, this clade contains the underutilized crop ramón (bread nut) (Brosimum alicastrum) as well as other species valued for timber or medicinal uses. Targe...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
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Synthesizing trait observations and knowledge across the Tree of Life remains a grand challenge for biodiversity science. Species traits are widely used in ecological and evolutionary science, and new data and methods have proliferated rapidly. Yet accessing and integrating disparate data sources remains a considerable challenge, slowing progress t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Deep relationships and the sequence of divergence among major lineages of angiosperms (magnoliids, monocots and eudicots) remain ambiguous and differ depending on analytical approaches and datasets used. Complete genomes potentially provide opportunities to resolve these uncertainties, but two recently published magnoliid genomes instead deliver fu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Synthesising trait observations and knowledge across the Tree of Life remains a grand challenge for biodiversity science. Despite the well-recognised importance of traits for addressing ecological and evolutionary questions, trait-based approaches still struggle with several basic data requirements to deliver openly accessible, reproducible, and tr...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Long‐distance dispersal has contributed to the disjunct biogeographical distribution of rain forest plants—something that has fascinated biogeographers since Humboldt's time. However, the dispersal agent for these tropical plant lineages remains puzzling. Here, we investigate which frugivory‐related traits may have facilitated past intercontine...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim: The Neotropics have the highest terrestrial biodiversity on earth. Investigating the relationships between the floras of the Neotropics and other tropical areas is critical to understanding the origin and evolution of this mega-diverse region. Tribe Dorstenieae (Moraceae) has a pantropical distribution and almost equal number of species on bot...
Article
Full-text available
Proteaceae are a basal eudicot family with a highly conserved floral groundplan but which displays considerable variation in other aspects of floral and inflorescence morphology. Their morphological diversity and phylogenetic position make them good candidates for understanding the evolution of floral architecture, in particular the question of the...
Article
Full-text available
Targeted enrichment and sequencing of hundreds of nuclear loci for phylogenetic reconstruction is becoming an important tool for plant systematics and evolution. Annonaceae is a major pantropical plant family with 110 genera and ca. 2,450 species, occurring across all major and minor tropical forests of the world. Baits were designed by sequencing...
Preprint
Full-text available
Targeted enrichment and sequencing of hundreds of nuclear loci for phylogenetic reconstruction is becoming an important tool for plant systematics and evolution. Annonaceae is a major pantropical plant family with 109 genera and ca. 2450 species, occurring across all major and minor tropical forests of the world. Baits were designed by sequencing t...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: Although dioecy, which characterizes only 6 % of angiosperm species, has been considered an evolutionary dead end, recent studies have demonstrated that this is not necessarily the case. Moraceae (40 genera, 1100 spp., including Ficus, 750 spp.) are particularly diverse in breeding systems (including monoecy, gynodioecy, andro...
Article
Full-text available
Ancestral state reconstruction is an important tool to study morphological evolution and often involves estimating transition rates among character states. However, various factors, including taxonomic scale and sampling density, may impact transition rate estimation and indirectly also the probability of the state at a given node. Here, we test th...
Article
Full-text available
Species diversity is remarkably unevenly distributed among flowering plant lineages. Despite a growing toolbox of research methods, the reasons underlying this patchy pattern have continued to perplex plant biologists for the past two decades. In this review, we examine the present understanding of transitions in flowering plant evolution that have...
Article
Full-text available
Taxon delimitation and classification remains one of the fundamental bases of evolutionary studies and is especially challenging because processes by which new biological entities arise are complex and non-linear over time, although continuous. Sisyrinchium (ca. 140 to 216 taxa) is one of the most species-rich genera of Iridaceae, largely widesprea...
Article
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Premise of the study: Apertures in pollen grains are key structures of the wall, involved in pollen tube germination and exchanges with the environment. Aperture types in angiosperms are diverse, but pollen with one and three apertures (including monosulcate and tricolpate, respectively) are the two most common types. Here, we investigate the phyl...