Henry Wood-Downie

Henry Wood-Downie
University of Southampton

About

8
Publications
1,581
Reads
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59
Citations

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Book review: The autism resource manual: practical strategies for teachers and other education professionals
Article
Full-text available
Poor math and numeracy skills are associated with a range of adverse outcomes, including reduced employability and poorer physical and mental health. Research has increasingly focused on understanding factors associated with the improvement of math skills in school. This systematic literature review and meta-analysis investigated the association be...
Article
Aims: ‘I am…’ Digital Stories are short videos designed to provide a holistic, strengths-based representation of the child through enabling them to contribute their perspectives to transition planning. Digital Stories have potential during periods in which professionals are unable to physically visit settings or spend time getting to know a child....
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated sex/gender differences in camouflaging with children and adolescents (N = 84) with and without an autism diagnosis/increased levels of autistic traits using two conceptualisations/operationalisations of camouflaging. A significant group-by-gender interaction using ANCOVA, with the covariate of verbal IQ, reflected similar le...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Evidence increasingly suggests that ASD manifests differently in females than males. Previous reviews investigating sex/gender differences in social interaction and social communication have focused at the level of broad constructs (e.g. comparing algorithm scores from pre-existing diagnostic instruments) and have typically reported no...
Thesis
A growing body of evidence suggests that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) manifests differently in females than males, including in the domains of social interaction and communication, and that there may be a female specific phenotype of the condition. Previous research investigating sex/gender differences in these domains has predominantly been base...
Article
This small-scale research project investigated the impact of a person-centred planning (PCP) tool – Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope (PATH) – with children and young people (CYP) with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) in mainstream settings. Semi-structured interviews were used to explore the perceived impact of the PATH pro...
Article
There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the behavioural manifestation of autism spectrum condition (ASC) differs between males and females, and there may be a female specific phenotype of the condition (Lai, Lombardo, Auyeung, Chakrabarti and Baron-Cohen, 2015). However, current conceptualisations of ASC have been developed predominatel...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The Autism Community Research Network @ Southampton [ACoRNS] is an education-focused initiative which seeks to improve the lives of children and young people on the autism spectrum. The project began in November 2016 with initial funding from the University of Southampton’s Public Engagement with Research Unit and is led by Professor Sarah Parsons, from the University’s Education School, and Dr Hanna Kovshoff in Psychology. ACoRNS is a collaboration between Education and Psychology at the University and local schools who are interested in developing, researching, understanding, and sharing good practice in educational provision for children on the autism spectrum and their families. We believe that the best way for autism research and practice to genuinely meet the needs of children and young people in the local community is to involve the local community from the start. In ACoRNS we are striving to meet our aims through: - involving children and young people with autism at the centre of research and practice; -establishing a co-constructed research agenda for identifying, investigating and implementing evidence-based practices in autism education; -building a collaborative partnership between the University of Southampton, professionals, schools, early years providers, and children and young people. Our focus is on understanding more about the trajectories and transitions of children and young people with autism. We want to know more about how to most effectively support children’s progress through school and enable them to have positive experiences. We also want to establish best practice for supporting children and families in making transitions, whether that be from home to school, from the classroom to the playground, or between and beyond stages of schooling. The project website is: http://acornsnetwork.org.uk/. Could you develop an ACoRN where you are? Please get in touch if you are interested. We can find out so much more if we work together.