Henry Streby

Henry Streby
University of Toledo · Department of Environmental Sciences

PhD

About

75
Publications
11,080
Reads
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1,056
Citations
Citations since 2016
48 Research Items
844 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
Additional affiliations
August 2012 - present
University of Tennessee
Position
  • National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow
August 2012 - present
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • Visiting Research Scholar
August 2012 - July 2015
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Publications

Publications (75)
Article
Full-text available
One of the most commonly estimated parameters in studies of songbird ecology is reproductive success, as a measure of either individual fitness or population productivity. Traditionally, the ''success'' in reproductive success refers to whether, or how many, nestlings leave nests. Here, we advocate that ''reproductive success'' in songbirds be rede...
Article
Full-text available
Migration is a common behavior used by animals of many taxa to occupy different habitats during different periods [1]. Migrant birds are categorized as either facultative (i.e., those that are forced to migrate by some proximal cue, often weather) or obligate (i.e., those that migrate on a regular cycle) [2, 3]. During migration, obligate migrants...
Article
We studied Ovenbird Seiurus aurocapilla and Golden-winged Warbler Vermivora chrysoptera populations in northern Minnesota, USA, to test two common assumptions in studies of songbird nest success: (1) that the condition of an empty nest on or near its expected fledge date is an indicator of nest fate; and (2) that the presence of a fledgling or fami...
Article
Full-text available
When opposing evolutionary selection pressures act on a behavioural trait, the result is often stabilizing selection for an intermediate optimal phenotype, with deviations from the predicted optimum attributed to tracking a moving target, development of behavioural syndromes or shifts in riskiness over an individual's lifetime. We investigated nest...
Article
Full-text available
Population models for many animals are limited by a lack of information regarding juvenile survival. In particular, studies of songbird reproductive output typically terminate with the success or failure of nests, despite the fact that adults spend the rest of the reproductive season rearing dependent fledglings. Unless fledgling survival does not...
Article
Amelia-Juliette Demery The Florence Merriam Bailey Award, named for the first woman “associate” of the AOU (1885) and the first woman elected as a Fellow of the AOU (1929), recognizes an outstanding article published in Ornithology or in Ornithological Applications by an early-career AOS member. This year’s award is presented to Amelia-Juliette Dem...
Article
(left) Teresa Pegan and (right) Benjamin Winger Every two years, the American Ornithological Society bestows the Brina C. Kessel Award for a paper published during the preceding two years in Ornithology (formerly The Auk: Ornithological Advances) that has made an exceptional contribution to ornithology. Given in even-numbered years and consisting o...
Article
Full-text available
Annual population growth in songbirds can be particularly sensitive to post-fledging survival, but research and management are frequently biased toward the nesting stage. Post-fledging information is particularly scarce for species breeding in desert bird communities, many of which have collapsed in recent decades. During 2017-2019 at Sevilleta Nat...
Article
Post‐fledging brood division is a poorly understood, yet widespread suite of avian behaviours that includes both division of parental care and spatial division of a brood. For most species, the differences in parental care between adult males and females and the behavioural mechanisms explaining spatial patterns of brood division are unknown. We st...
Article
Full-text available
Differing selection pressures on stationary nest contents compared to mobile offspring mean that the nest-site characteristics resulting in the highest nest success may not be the same characteristics that result in the highest survival of juveniles from those nests. In such cases, maternal nest-site choice may optimize productivity overall by sele...
Article
Full-text available
We present comments on an article published by Confer et al. (Ecology and Evolution, 10, 2020). Confer et al. (2020) aggregate data from multiple studies of social pairing between Vermivora chrysoptera and V. cyanoptera, two wood warblers in the family Parulidae that hybridize extensively where they co‐occur. From analysis of these data, they concl...
Article
Harmful algal blooms (HABs), caused primarily by nutrient input from agricultural runoff, are a threat to freshwater systems worldwide, and are further predicted to increase in size, frequency, and intensity due to climate change. HABs occur annually in the Western Basin of Lake Erie (Ohio, USA), and these blooms become toxic when dominated by cyan...
Article
Full-text available
The documentation of hybrids between distantly related taxa can illustrate an initial step to explain how genes might move between species that do not exhibit complete reproductive isolation. In birds, some of the most phylogenetically distant hybrid combinations occur between genera. Traditionally, morphological and plumage characters have been us...
Article
Full-text available
The documentation of hybrids between distantly related taxa can illustrate an initial step to explain how genes might move between species that do not exhibit complete reproductive isolation. In birds, some of the most phylogenetically distant hybrid combinations occur between genera. Traditionally, morphological and plumage characters have been us...
Article
Hybrids with different combinations of traits can be used to identify genomic regions that underlie phenotypic characters important to species identity and recognition. Here, we explore links between genomic and plumage variation in Blue-winged Warbler x Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera x V. chrysoptera) hybrids, which have traditionally...
Article
Full-text available
Tests with binary outcomes (e.g., positive versus negative) to indicate a binary state of nature (e.g., disease agent present versus absent) are common. These tests are rarely perfect: chances of a false positive and a false negative always exist. Imperfect results cannot be directly used to infer the true state of the nature; information about the...
Article
Full-text available
Migratory movements of facultative migrants are poorly understood due to their irregular and often unpredictable occurrence. However, tracking such movements is important for understanding population dynamics, informing annual cycle conservation plans, and identifying possible cues of facultative migration. We used pinpoint GPS tags to track autumn...
Chapter
Full-text available
The effects of landscape composition and configuration on productivity of most bird species, including Ameri-can woodcock (Scolopax minor), are largely unknown. Understanding landscape components and cover-type configurations associated with productivity can be useful in developing more effective management strategies that increase recruitment. We...
Article
Full-text available
Birdsong has captivated humans throughout recorded history. Birdsong is incredibly diverse as is the process of song learning (Kroodsma 2004, Beecher and Brenowitz 2005). Songbirds (Order: Passeriformes) are categorized into two broad groups based on whether they learn their songs (oscine) or whether the development of species‐appropriate songs is...
Article
Full-text available
Animal migration demands an interconnected suite of adaptations for individuals to navigate over long distances. This trait complex is crucial for small birds whose migratory behaviors—such as directionality—are more likely innate, rather than being learned as in many longer-lived birds. Identifying causal genes has been a central goal of migration...
Preprint
Animal migration demands an interconnected suite of physiological, behavioral, and neurological adaptations for individuals to successfully navigate and travel over long distances. This trait complex is especially crucial for small songbirds whose migratory behaviors--like directionality and orientation--are innate, rather than being learned as in...
Article
Multi-species approaches to wildlife management have become commonplace and purport to benefit entire biological communities. These strategies aim to manage different, often taxonomically distant species under a single regime based on shared habitat associations and/or co-occurrence in the landscape. We tested the efficacy of multi-species manageme...
Article
Full-text available
Niche breadth is predicted to correlate with environmental heterogeneity, such that generalists will evolve in heterogeneous environments and specialists will evolve in environments that vary less over space and time. We tested the hypothesis that lizards in a heterogeneous environment were generalists compared to lizards in a homogeneous environme...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Birds serve as reservoirs for tick-borne pathogens as well as hosts for multiple tick species of public health relevance. Birds may perpetuate life cycles of vectors and vector-borne pathogens and disperse disease vectors over long distances, supplementing populations at range margins or seeding invading populations beyond the edges o...
Article
Full-text available
In the past few years, miniature light-level geolocators have been developed for tracking wild bird species that were previously too small to track during their full annual cycle. Geolocators offer an exciting opportunity to study the full annual cycle for many species. However, the potential detrimental effects of carrying geolocators are still po...
Data
Data used to produce analyses presented in this study. The complete dataset used in this study. (TXT)
Data
Code used to produce analyses in this study. This R script contains the code necessary to recreate all of the analyses and figures presented in this study using the dataset provided above. (R)
Article
Full-text available
Hybridization between divergent taxa can provide insight into the breakdown of characters used in mate choice, as well as reproductive compatibility across deep evolutionary timescales. Hybridization can also occur more frequently in declining populations, as there is a smaller pool of conspecific mates from which to choose. Here, we report an unus...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Identifying drivers of population trends in migratory animals is difficult due to their reliance on different geographic regions throughout the annual cycle. Populations of Nearctic–Neotropical migratory birds are often thought to be limited by spatial variation in factors affecting reproduction and survival during the breeding season....
Article
Full-text available
Thermoregulatory behaviour enables ectotherms to maintain preferred body temperatures across a range of environmental conditions, and it may buffer individuals against the effects of climate warming. In lizards, the mechanism underlying variation in thermoregulatory behaviour has long been assumed to be phenotypic plasticity, and while this assumpt...
Article
Lisovski et al.[1] describe the widely recognized limitations of light-level geolocator data for identifying short-distance latitudinal movements, recommend that caution be used when interpreting such data, intimated that we did not use such caution and argued that environmental shading likely explained the Golden-winged Warbler (Vermivora chrysopt...
Article
Full-text available
Background Assessing outcomes of habitat management is critical for informing and adapting conservation plans. From 2013–2019, a multi-stage management initiative, led by the American Bird Conservancy (ABC), aims to create >25,000 ha of shrubland and early-successional vegetation to benefit Golden-winged Warblers ( Vermivora chrysoptera ) in manage...
Data
Raw nest and fledgling survival data Raw Golden-winged Warbler nest and fledgling survival data used to inform spatially explicit models of full-season productivity in Peterson (2014) and in the models applied in this manuscript.
Data
Modeled future productivity by the Golden-winged Warblers in the managed area under three vegetation succession scenarios Modeled post-management full-season productivity of Golden-winged Warblers in the area of Rice Lake NWR managed to benefit Golden-winged Warblers. Scenarios 1 (sheet 1), 2 (sheet 2), and 3 (sheet 3) include estimates of producti...
Article
Full-text available
A recent paper published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications by Raybuck et al. (2017) described the results of an analysis of potential effects of light-level geolocators on reproductive parameters and apparent annual survival of Cerulean Warblers (Setophaga cerulea). In a comparison of geolocator-tagged birds and color-banded control birds,...
Article
Full-text available
Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) are Nearctic-Neotropical migrants experiencing varied regional population trends not fully explained by breeding-grounds factors such as nest success. A lack of detailed information on the nonbreeding distributions, migration routes, or timing of migration among populations hampers our ability to ident...
Article
Full-text available
Brood division in the postfledging period is a common avian behavior that is not well understood. Brood division has been reported in Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera), but it is not known how common this behavior is, whether males and females exhibit different strategies related to parental care and habitat use, or how brood division...
Article
Full-text available
Postfledging habitat use and fledgling survival remain unstudied for most songbirds, but this period is critical for understanding breeding habitat associations and full-season productivity. We used radiotelemetry to study movements, cover-type selection, and survival of fledgling Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) during the dependent...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between landscape structure and composition and full-season productivity (FSP) is poorly understood for most birds. For species of high conservation concern, insight into how productivity is related to landscape structure and composition can be used to develop more effective conservation strategies that increase recruitment. We mon...
Data
The .lig files are comma separated time stamped ASCII data files where each time-stamped record is on a separate line. The header line of each file contains a three-variable string. Its meaning is unclear. The header lines are removed before data analysis. The .lig files can be opened by any text editors. The original data analysis is read into R u...
Book
Full-text available
PDF of book and chapters available at https://conservancy.umn.edu/handle/11299/189700
Article
Full-text available
We compared the efficacy of standard nest-searching methods with finding nests via radio-tagged birds to assess how search technique influenced our determination of nest-site characteristics and nest success for Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera). We also evaluated the cost-effectiveness of using radio-tagged birds to find nests. Using...
Article
Full-text available
The use of light-level geolocators is increasingly common for connecting breeding and nonbreeding sites and identifying migration routes in birds. Until recently, the mass and size of geolocators precluded their use on songbird species weighing <12 g. Reducing the mass of geolocators, such as by shortening or eliminating the light stalk, may make t...
Article
Full-text available
Radio-transmitters and light-level geolocators are currently small enough for use on songbirds weighing ,15 g. Various methods are used to attach these markers to larger songbirds, but with small birds it becomes especially important to minimize marker mass and bird handling time. Here, we offer modifications to harness materials and marker prepara...
Article
Full-text available
For migratory songbirds, breeding-grounds conservation and management plans are generally focused on habitat associated with locations of singing males and sometimes nesting females. However, habitat structure is often different in areas used for raising fledglings compared with areas used for song territories, and very little is known about habita...
Article
Full-text available
Relative nestling condition, typically measured as nestling mass or as an index including nestling mass, is commonly purported to correlate with fledgling songbird survival. However, most studies directly investigating fledgling survival have found no such relationship. We weighed feces and stomach contents of nestling golden-winged warblers (Vermi...
Article
Investigating the potential effects of handling and marking techniques on study animals is important for correct interpretation of research results and to effect progress in data-collection methods. Few investigators have compared the reproductive output of radio-tagged and non-radio-tagged songbirds, and no one to date has examined the possible ef...
Article
Despite the broad consensus that force‐fledging of nestling songbirds lowers their probability of survival and therefore should be generally avoided by researchers, that presumption has not been tested. We used radiotelemetry to monitor the survival of fledglings of Ovenbirds Seiurus aurocapilla and Golden‐winged Warblers Vermivora chrysoptera that...
Article
Full-text available
Survival of fledgling songbirds can be influenced by habitat characteristics at multiple spatial scales, and identifying the relative influence of habitat characteristics at the micro (immediately surrounding fledglings) and meso (level of stand or cover type) scales is important for management and conservation planning. We modeled survival of fled...
Article
We used radio telemetry to monitor movements, cover-type selection, and survival for fledglings of the mature-forest nesting Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) at two managed forest sites in north-central Minnesota. Both sites contained forested wetlands, regenerating clearcut stands of various ages, and logging roads, but differed in mature forest com...
Article
Full-text available
Food-value theory states that territorial animals space themselves such that each territory contains adequate food for rearing young. The ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) is often cited as a species for which this hypothesis is supported because ovenbird territory size is inversely related to ground-invertebrate abundance within territories. However,...
Article
Full-text available
We used radiotelemetry to monitor movements and cover-type selection by independent fledgling Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapilla) at two managed-forest sites differing in mature-forest matrix: open-understory deciduous forest and dense-understory mixed-deciduous-conifer forest. Ovenbirds at each site made one to three single-day long-distance movements...
Article
Studies of songbird breeding habitat often compare habitat characteristics of used and unused areas. Although there is usually meticulous effort to precisely and consistently measure habitat characteristics, accuracy of methods for estimating which areas are used versus which are unused by birds remains generally untested. To examine accuracy of sp...
Article
Full-text available
Brood parasitism by Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater) typically decreases the number of host juveniles that fledge: however, little information exists regarding the effect of cowbird parasitismduring the post-fledging period. We monitored 115 Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) nests in 2006–2008 in northcentral Minnesota, six of which were parasit...
Article
Some species of mature-forest-nesting songbirds use regenerating clearcuts and forested wetlands during the postfledging period (between nesting and migration). Relatively dense vegetation structure and abundant food resources in non-mature-forest cover types have been hypothesized to explain this phenomenon. We examined the relative importance of...