Henry S Pollock

Henry S Pollock
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | UIUC · Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences

PhD

About

31
Publications
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Introduction
PhD: Comparative eco-physiology of temperate and tropical birds. Postdoc #1: Seed dispersal ecology and conservation of Guam's avifauna. Postdoc #2: Analyzing a long-term population study of Neotropical birds from central Panama. Postdoc #3: Human-bird interactions in urbanized landscapes
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2017 - August 2019
Colorado State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
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Army-ants (particularly swarm-raiding species Eciton burchellii and Labidus praedator) are keystone predators in Neotropical forests. Hundreds of associated species from diverse taxa depend on them for survival, the most conspicuous of which are the ant-following birds. These birds forage on cryptic arthropods and vertebrates as they attempt to esc...
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Avian species across diverse lineages collect and incorporate mammalian hair into their nests (Tóth 2008). This widespread behavior can be adaptive, as hair, fur or wool insulates nests and so enhances nestling survival and recruitment in colder climates (Hilton et al. 2004, Mainwaring et al. 2014, Järvinen and Brommer 2020, Deeming et al. 2020; re...
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Functional traits offer a rich quantitative framework for developing and testing theories in evolutionary biology, ecology and ecosystem science. However, the potential of functional traits to drive theoretical advances and refine models of global change can only be fully realised when species-level information is complete. Here we present the AVON...
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Significance We leveraged a 44-y population study of Neotropical understory birds from a protected forest reserve in central Panama to document widespread and severe declines in bird abundance. Our findings provide evidence that tropical bird populations may be undergoing systematic declines, even in relatively intact forests. The implications of t...
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Personality, or repeatable variation in behavior, may impact an animal's survival or reproduction. Parental aggression is one such personality trait with potentially direct implications for fitness, as it can improve offspring survival during vulnerable early life stages. We took advantage of a long‐term nest box and fledgling survival monitoring p...
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Extensive networks of large plots have the potential to transform knowledge of avian community dynamics through time and across geographical space. In the Neotropics, the global hotspot of avian diversity, only six 100-ha plots, all located in lowland forests of Amazonia, the Guianan shield and Panama, have been inventoried sufficiently. We review...
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Rainfall regime, the amount and timing of annual precipitation, can influence the breeding phenology, individual fitness, and population dynamics of tropical birds. In Neotropical regions with rainfall seasonality (i.e. wet and dry seasons), the warm phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can exacerbate seasonal drought and negatively imp...
Article
Brood parasitism is the introduction of unrelated progeny into the nest or colony of a host that then raises the foreign young. This reproductive strategy has evolved independently and repeatedly among diverse animal taxa, and brood parasite–host interactions have become models for understanding coevolutionary arms races. Yet brood parasites have r...
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Assessing the impacts of invasive predators on the demography and distribution of native species is critical for understanding mechanisms of species persistence and informing the design of recovery programmes. On the oceanic island of Guam, the introduction of the predatory brown treesnake Boiga irregularis after World War II caused the near-total...
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en We surveyed zoochorous seedlings at an urbanized site on Guam with a remnant population of frugivores, and an otherwise similar site lacking all frugivores. Both seedling richness and abundance were much higher at the site with frugivores, providing hope that small populations can retain or restore ecological function. Abstract in Fino' CHamoru...
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Characterizing heat tolerance is critical for predicting an organism's vulnerability to climate warming. Recent studies of ectotherms report that impacts of climate warming are expected to be greater in the tropics, where ectotherms tend to have lower heat tolerances and experience air temperatures closer to their heat tolerance limits than their t...
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en Ecological disturbance is an important factor that influences the abundance and distribution of species. Treefalls are a prominent source of disturbance in tropical forests, but robust characterization of community change after treefalls requires baseline data that are often not available. We capitalized on 25 yr of avian mark–recapture data fro...
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Seed dispersal is an important ecological process that structures plant communities and influences ecosystem functioning. Loss of animal dispersers therefore poses a serious threat to forest ecosystems, particularly in the tropics where zoochory predominates. A prominent example is the near-total extinction of seed dispersers on the tropical island...
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Invasive predators have caused widespread loss of biodiversity in island ecosystems, yet certain species are able to tolerate the presence of generalist invaders. For example, the invasive brown treesnake (BTS; Boiga irregularis) caused the extirpation of 10 of 12 native forest bird species on the island of Guam, but a remnant population of the Mic...
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Phenotypic flexibility can be an important determinant of fitness in variable environments. The climatic variability hypothesis (CVH) predicts that phenotypic flexibility in thermoregulatory traits will be greater in temperate species than tropical species as a means of coping with increased temperature seasonality at higher latitudes. However, sup...
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The brown treesnake’s (Boiga irregularis – BTS) invasion of Guam is a primary example of the devastation an invasive predator can have on island ecosystems. Its introduction following WWII caused the extirpation of most of the island’s avifauna, although some native species have managed to persist in the presence of BTS, including a small populatio...
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Animals frequently make decisions based on social information obtained from other animals, which can influence interspecific interactions and affect individual fitness. For example, animals eavesdrop on other animals to find profitable food resources, yet the types of cues they use and how these cues influence decisions to approach a resource remai...
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Reduction in metabolic rate and body temperature is a common strategy for small endotherms to save energy. The daily reduction in metabolic rate and heterothermy, or torpor, is particularly pronounced in regions with a large variation in daily ambient temperature. This applies most strongly in temperate bat species (order Chiroptera), but it is les...
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Disturbance foraging-the use of disturbances created by other animals to locate cryptic or sedentary prey-is a widespread phenomenon, particularly in birds. In the Neotropics, a prominent example of disturbance foraging in birds is their relationship with army ants (Eciton burchellii). Numerous bird species attend army ant swarms and forage on the...
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Animals eavesdrop on other species to obtain information about their environments. Heterospecific eavesdropping can yield tangible fitness benefits by providing valuable information about food resources and predator presence. The ability to eavesdrop may therefore be under strong selection, although extensive research on alarm-calling in avian mixe...
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Active flight requires the ability to efficiently fuel bursts of costly locomotion while maximizing energy conservation during non-flying times. We took a multi-faceted approach to estimate how fruit-eating bats (Uroderma bilobatum) manage a high-energy lifestyle fueled primarily by fig juice. Miniaturized heart rate telemetry shows that they use a...
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Examining physiological traits across large spatial scales can shed light on the environmental factors driving physiological variation. For endotherms, flexibility in aerobic metabolism is especially important for coping with thermally challenging environments and recent research has shown that aerobic metabolic scope [the difference between maximu...
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Local abiotic conditions (microclimates) vary spatially and selection of favorable microclimates within a habitat can influence an animal’s energy budgets, behavior, and ultimately, fitness. Insectivorous birds that inhabit the understory of tropical forests may be especially sensitive to environmental variation and may select habitat based on micr...
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The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is the most destructive lepidopteran pest of almonds [Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A.Webb] and pistachios (Pistacia vera L.) in California and is a serious problem in figs (Ficus carica L.) and walnuts (Juglans spp.). In addition to direct damage, larval feeding leaves nuts vu...
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Background: Honey bees are exposed to phytochemicals through the nectar, pollen and propolis consumed to sustain the colony. They may also encounter mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus fungi infesting pollen in beebread. Moreover, bees are exposed to agricultural pesticides, particularly in-hive acaricides used against the parasite Varroa destructo...
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The varroa mite, Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, is a devastating pest of honey bees, Apis mellifera L., that has been primarily controlled over the last 15 yr with two in-hive miticides: the organophosphate coumaphos (Checkmite+), and the pyrethroid tau-fluvalinate (Apistan). Both coumaphos and tau-fluvalinate are lipophilic compounds that a...
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It has been proposed that one route of behavioral evolution involves novel regulation of conserved genes. Age-related division of labor in honey bee colonies, a highly derived behavioral system, involves the performance of different feeding-related tasks by different groups of individuals. Older bees acquire the colony's food by foraging for nectar...

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