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Henrike Schulte to Buehne

Henrike Schulte to Buehne
Zoological Society London · Institute of Zoology

About

14
Publications
40,133
Reads
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347
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2016 - October 2017
Zoological Society London
Position
  • Technician

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Rewilding is increasingly considered as an option for environmental regeneration, with potential for enhancing both biodiversity and ecosystem services. So far, however, there is little practical information on how to gauge the benefits and limitations of rewilding schemes on ecosystem composition, structure and functioning. To address this knowled...
Article
An ongoing war between the Ethiopian government and its allies against Tigray, one of its northern states, has led to one of the world’s biggest humanitarian crises. We have used satellite data to track how the conflict and resulting energy crisis has also broken the relationship between humans and nature. People have been forced to use firewood,...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Fires play an important role in savannah ecosystems, shaping among other things vegetation structure and altering species composition. As direct and indirect anthropogenic pressures on these ecosystems increase, fire dynamics in savannahs are expected to change in the coming decades, with potential impacts on ecosystem functioning. Althoug...
Article
Full-text available
More than 30 years after it was first proposed as a biodiversity conservation strategy, rewilding remains a controversial concept. There is currently little agreement about what the goals of rewilding are, and how these are best achieved, limiting the utility of rewilding in mainstream conservation. Achieving consensus about rewilding requires agre...
Article
Climate change and land use change often interact, altering biodiversity in unexpected ways. Research into climate change-land use change (CC-LUC) interactions has so far focused on quantifying biodiversity outcomes, rather than identifying the underlying ecological mechanisms, making it difficult to predict interactions and design appropriate cons...
Article
Rapid climate change is threatening the stability and functioning of Arctic ecosystems. As the Arctic warms, shrubs have been widely observed to expand, which has potentially serious consequences for global climate regulation and for the ecological processes characterising these ecosystems. However, it is currently unclear why this shrubification h...
Article
Full-text available
Up-to-date land cover maps are important for biodiversity monitoring as they are central to habitat and ecosystem distribution assessments. Satellite remote sensing is a key technology for generating these maps. Until recently, land cover mapping has been limited to static approaches, which have primarily led to the production of either global maps...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem collapse, i.e. the endpoint of ecosystem decline, is a central concept of IUCN Red List of Ecosystems (RLE) assessments and the identification of ecosystems most vulnerable to global environmental change. Estimating collapse risk can be challenging for ecosystems reliant on a few dominant species to perform most of their functions because...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This latest chapter in the Conservation Technology Series from WWF-UK looks at the opportunities, challenges and state-of-the-art of satellite remote sensing for conservation applications. This issue reviews available satellite imagery and derived datasets, a comprehensive guide to data sources, common processing workflows and case studies.
Article
Full-text available
Rewilding, here defined as “the reorganisation of biota and ecosystem processes to set an identified social–ecological system on a preferred trajectory, leading to the self-sustaining provision of ecosystem services with minimal ongoing management,” is increasingly considered as an environmental management option, with potential for enhancing both...
Article
The availability and accessibility of multispectral and radar Satellite Remote Sensing (SRS) imagery are at an unprecedented high. These data have both become standard source of information for investigating species ecology and ecosystems structure, composition and function at large scales. Since they capture complementary aspects of the Earth's su...
Article
Full-text available
Societal, economic and scientific interests in knowing where biodiversity is, how it is faring and what can be done to efficiently mitigate further biodiversity loss and the associated loss of ecosystem services are at an all-time high. So far, however, biodiversity monitoring has primarily focused on structural and compositional features of ecosys...
Article
Full-text available
Transboundary cooperation is being promoted as an effective way to conserve biodiversity that straddles national borders. However, monitoring the ecological outcomes of these large-scale endeavours is challenging, and as a result, the factors and processes likely to shape their effectiveness remain poorly identified and understood. To address this...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This GEO pilot initiative seeks to identify, collate and make accessible environmental, ecological, and societal data and information pertaining to the implementation and monitoring of rewilding and restoration sites globally. Specifically, it aims to (1) identify the needs of diverse users of data and information pertaining to the rewilding and restoration of ecologically degraded sites; (2) improve the use of Earth observations in implementing and monitoring rewilding and restoration projects; (3) communicate, link, and develop reporting capacity that responds to policy needs.
Project
Our aim is to maximize the effectiveness of technology for conservation, ecological research, and citizen science by providing experienced as well as new users with accessible and freely available, peer-edited guidance. We've four guidance documents to date - camera trapping, passive acoustic monitoring, remote sensing with lidar, and satellite remote sensing - more planned for the future. All guidelines are freely available via ResearchGate and the WWF website. Whilst the guidelines are designed to aid practitioners in the field, they should also be useful for novices that require a basic introduction to the technologies, highly skilled professionals that are primarily interested in the latest best practice guidelines for research, and citizen scientists that may have questions about what the technologies can and cannot do.