Henkjan Honing

Henkjan Honing
University of Amsterdam | UVA · Institute of Logic, Language and Computation

prof. dr
Professor in Music Cognition

About

297
Publications
43,308
Reads
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4,634
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 1997 - September 2003
Radboud University
Position
  • Project Manager
February 1992 - present
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor of Music Cognition

Publications

Publications (297)
Article
Full-text available
It was recently shown that rhythmic entrainment, long considered a human-specific mechanism, can be demonstrated in a selected group of bird species, and, somewhat surprisingly, not in more closely related species such as nonhuman primates. This observation supports the vocal learning hypothesis that suggests rhythmic entrainment to be a by-product...
Article
Full-text available
We propose a decomposition of the neurocognitive mechanisms that might underlie interval-based timing and rhythmic entrainment. Next to reviewing the concepts central to the definition of rhythmic entrainment, we discuss recent studies that suggest rhythmic entrainment to be specific to humans and a selected group of bird species, but, surprisingly...
Article
Full-text available
Musicality can be defined as a natural, spontaneously developing trait based on and constrained by biology and cognition. Music, by contrast, can be defined as a social and cultural construct based on that very musicality. One critical challenge is to delineate the constituent elements of musicality. What biological and cognitive mechanisms are ess...
Article
Full-text available
Beat perception is the ability to perceive temporal regularity in musical rhythm. When a beat is perceived, predictions about upcoming events can be generated. These predictions can influence processing of subsequent rhythmic events. However, statistical learning of the order of sounds in a sequence can also affect processing of rhythmic events and...
Article
Full-text available
While humans can easily entrain their behavior with the beat in music, this ability is rare among animals. Yet, comparative studies in non-human species are needed if we want to understand how and why this ability evolved. Entrainment requires two abilities: (1) recognizing the regularity in the auditory stimulus and (2) the ability to adjust the o...
Preprint
Language and music are universal human traits, raising the question for their evolutionary origin. This chapter takes a comparative perspective to address that question. It examines similarities and differences between humans and non-human animals (mammals and birds) by addressing whether and which constituent cognitive components that underlie the...
Article
Full-text available
This brief statement revisits some earlier observations on what makes web-based experiments, and especially citizen science using engaging games, an attractive alternative to laboratory-based setups. It suggests web-based experimenting to be a full-grown alternative to traditional laboratory-based experiments, especially in the field of music cogni...
Preprint
This brief statement revisits some earlier observations on what makes web-based experiments, and especially citizen science using engaging games, an attractive alternative to laboratory-based setups. It suggests web-based experimenting to be a full-grown alternative to traditional laboratory-based experiments, especially in the field music cognitio...
Article
Full-text available
This theme issue assembles current studies that ask how and why precise synchronization and related forms of rhythm interaction are expressed in a wide range of behaviour. The studies cover human activity, with an emphasis on music, and social behaviour, reproduction and communication in non-human animals. In most cases, the temporally aligned rhyt...
Article
Humans perceive and spontaneously move to one or several levels of periodic pulses (a meter, for short) when listening to musical rhythm, even when the sensory input does not provide prominent periodic cues to their temporal location. Here, we review a multi-levelled framework to understanding how external rhythmic inputs are mapped onto internally...
Article
Full-text available
The two target articles address the origins of music in complementary ways. However, both proposals focus on overt musical behaviour, largely ignoring the role of perception and cognition, and they blur the boundaries between the potential origins of language and music. To resolve this, an alternative research strategy is proposed that focuses on t...
Book
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Chapter
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Article
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Music and language have long been considered two distinct cognitive faculties governed by domain-specific cognitive and neural mechanisms. Recent work into the domain-specificity of pitch processing in both domains appears to suggest pitch processing to be governed by shared neural mechanisms. The current study aimed to explore the domain-specifici...
Article
Full-text available
Many foundational questions in the psychology of music require cross-cultural approaches, yet the vast majority of work in the field to date has been conducted with Western participants and Western music. For cross-cultural research to thrive, it will require collaboration between people from different disciplinary backgrounds, as well as strategie...
Article
Predicting the timing of incoming information allows the brain to optimize information processing in dynamic environments. Behaviorally, temporal expectations have been shown to facilitate processing of events at expected time points, such as sounds that coincide with the beat in musical rhythm. Yet, temporal expectations can develop based on diffe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Predicting the timing of incoming information allows the brain to optimize information processing in dynamic environments. Behaviorally, temporal expectations have been shown to facilitate processing of events at expected time points, such as sounds that coincide with the beat in musical rhythm. Yet, temporal expectations can develop based on diffe...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Previous literature has shown a putative relationship between playing a musical instrument and a benefit in various cognitive domains. However, to date it still remains unknown whether the exposure to a musically-enriched environment instead of playing an instrument yourself might also increase cognitive domains such as language, mathe...
Data
Example of a rhythmic pattern used in the isochronous condition. [1_isochronous.wav].
Data
Example of a rhythmic pattern used in the jittered condition. [2_jittered.wav].
Article
Full-text available
Charles Darwin suggested the perception of rhythm to be common to all animals. While only recently experimental research is finding some support for this claim, there are also aspects of rhythm cognition that appear to be species-specific, such as the capability to perceive a regular pulse (or beat) in a varying rhythm. In the current study, using...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, music and musicality have been the focus of an increasing amount of research effort. This has led to a growing role and visibility of the contribution of (bio)musicology to the field of neuroscience and cognitive sciences at large. While it has been widely acknowledged that there are commonalities between speech, language, and musi...
Article
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Background: Research on the effects of music education on cognitive abilities has generated increasing interest across the scientific community. Nonetheless, longitudinal studies investigating the effects of structured music education on cognitive sub-functions are still rare. Prime candidates for investigating a relationship between academic achie...
Article
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Despite differences in their function and domain-specific elements, syntactic processing in music and language is believed to share cognitive resources. This study aims to investigate whether the simultaneous processing of language and music share the use of a common syntactic processor or more general attentional resources. To investigate this mat...
Article
Full-text available
Perception of a regular beat in music is inferred from different types of accents. For example, increases in loudness cause intensity accents, and the grouping of time intervals in a rhythm creates temporal accents. Accents are expected to occur on the beat: when accents are “missing” on the beat, the beat is more difficult to find. However, it is...
Data
Temporal rhythm with 1 beat missing and 1 accent off the beat. (MP3)
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Temporal rhythm with 1 beat missing and 2 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Temporal rhythm with 2 beats missing and 1 accent off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Intensity rhythm with 2 beats missing and 1 accent off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Intensity rhythm with 3 beats missing and 3 accents off the beat. (MP3)
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Intensity rhythm with 3 beats missing and 5 accents off the beat. (MP3)
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Temporal rhythm with 3 beats missing and 3 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Temporal rhythm with 3 beats missing and 4 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Intensity rhythm with 1 beat missing and 1 accent off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Intensity rhythm with 3 beats missing and 4 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Temporal rhythm with 0 beats missing and 0 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Temporal rhythm with 2 beats missing and 2 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Temporal rhythm with 2 beats missing and 3 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Temporal rhythm with 3 beats missing and 5 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Intensity rhythm with 0 beats missing and 0 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Intensity rhythm with 1 beat missing and 0 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Intensity rhythm with 2 beats missing and 2 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Intensity rhythm with 2 beats missing and 3 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Example of the interface used during the online experiment. (PDF)
Data
Temporal rhythm with 1 beat missing and 0 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Intensity rhythm with 1 beat missing and 2 accents off the beat. (MP3)
Data
Dataset from both Experiment 1 and Experiment 2. Labels and descriptions can be found in the “readme” tab. (XLSX)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Hooked on Music (Burgoyne, Bountouridis, van Balen, & Honing, 2013) is a citizen science project developed to uncover what makes music memorable. The game consists of two stages: firstly, recognizing a song fragment, secondly, verifying that one actually knows that song well, by correctly singing along to it. Half of the time, the music actually co...
Article
Full-text available
This editorial serves a number of purposes. First, it aims at summarizing and discussing 33 accepted contributions to the special issue “The evolution of rhythm cognition: Timing in music and speech.” The major focus of the issue is the cognitive neuroscience of rhythm, intended as a neurobehavioral trait undergoing an evolutionary process. Second,...
Article
Full-text available
Enculturation is known to shape the perception of meter in music but this is not explicitly accounted for by current cognitive models of meter perception. We hypothesize that the induction of meter is a result of predictive coding: interpreting onsets in a rhythm relative to a periodic meter facilitates prediction of future onsets. Such prediction,...
Article
Full-text available
We present a hypothesis-driven study on the variation of melody phrases in a collection of Dutch folk songs. We investigate the variation of phrases within the folk songs through a pattern matching method which detects occurrences of these phrases within folk song variants, and ask the question: do the phrases which show less variation have differe...
Article
Full-text available
Whether pitch in language and music is governed by domain-specific or domain-general cognitive mechanisms is contentiously debated. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether mechanisms governing pitch contour perception operate differently when pitch information is interpreted as either speech or music. By modulating listening mode, t...