Helene Marsh

Helene Marsh
James Cook University · Centre for Tropical and Freshwater Research (TropWATER)

About

314
Publications
97,848
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
11,726
Citations
Citations since 2016
39 Research Items
4914 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220200400600
20162017201820192020202120220200400600
20162017201820192020202120220200400600
20162017201820192020202120220200400600

Publications

Publications (314)
Chapter
Climate change stressors are already affecting the subtropical and tropical coastal, estuarine, and riverine habitats of sirenians with consequential changes to their ethology and behavioral ecology. Climate change is causing temperature increases, sea level rise, changes in water chemistry and quality , increase in the intensity and nature of extr...
Chapter
Sirenians are culturally significant to traditional and contemporary human communities throughout their ranges. They live in tropical and sub-tropical coastal, riverine, and lacustrine habitats, including many sites of high human use. Manatees and dugongs nurse their calves over prolonged periods via axillary teats and their mammary glands have oft...
Chapter
Manatees and dugongs live in tropical and semi-tropical regions around the world. Their preferred habitats are seagrass beds, rivers, lakes, and estuaries. Manatees live in both freshwater and marine systems although habitat preferences vary across the three species, while the dugong is entirely marine. Sirenians are shallow water divers, and their...
Article
Full-text available
Marine mammal interactions with fisheries, such as bycatch and depredation, are a common occurrence across commercial and small-scale fisheries. We conducted a systematic review to assess the management responses to marine mammal interactions with fisheries. We analyzed literature between 1995 and 2021 to measure research trends in studies on direc...
Article
Full-text available
Seagrass meadows support key ecosystem services, via provision of food directly for herbivores, and indirectly to their predators. The importance of herbivores in seagrass meadows has been well-documented, but the links between food webs and ecosystem services in seagrass meadows have not previously been made explicit. Herbivores interact with ecos...
Article
Full-text available
The geographic range of sea kraits encompasses one of the geologically most-complex regions of the world. At its center lies Wallacea (the transition between the terrestrial biotas of the Asian and Australian tectonic plates) and the Indonesian Throughflow (nexus of the equatorial marine biotas of the Indian and Pacific oceans). The aim of this stu...
Article
Full-text available
Context. Sound understanding of temporal changes in the abundance of wildlife species is required for assessing their status and for effective conservation and management. In New Caledonia, a single baseline aerial survey of dugongs in 2003 estimated a population of 2026 (� 553 s.e.) individuals. A second, similar survey in 2008 produced a lower es...
Article
Full-text available
BackgroundA substantial period of life after reproduction ends, known as postreproductive lifespan (PRLS), is at odds with classical life history theory and its causes and mechanisms have puzzled evolutionary biologists for decades. Prolonged PRLS has been confirmed in only two non-human mammals, both odontocete cetaceans in the family Delphinidae....
Chapter
Although the impacts of climate change on the welfare of individual manatees and dugongs are still uncertain, the effects are likely to be through indirect interactions between meteorological and biotic factors and the human responses to climate change. We divided the potential impacts into (1) those that will potentially affect sirenians directly...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents the result of an aerial survey for dugongs and large juvenile and adult marine turtles that was conducted in October-November 2016 in the coastal waters of Queensland from just north of Hinchinbrook Island to the Queensland-New South Wales border. The survey is the latest in the time series of surveys conducted by James Cook Un...
Article
Full-text available
As the world's human population increases along the coastal zone, with major alteration of coastal embayments, increased on-water activities and a plethora of other intrusions into the coastal zone, there is a simultaneous increase in pressures on marine mammals. Growing evidence indicates that many marine mammals are highly susceptible to declines...
Article
Full-text available
Prioritisation methods have been adopted for >20 years to inform resource allocation in species conservation. The academic literature on prioritisation focuses on technical matters, with little attention to the socio-political factors affecting the uptake of priorities. We investigated the policy instruments employed to promote uptake, and the stru...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction A substantial period of life after reproduction ends, known as postreproductive lifespan (PRLS), is at odds with classical life history theory and its causes and mechanisms have puzzled evolutionary biologists for decades. Prolonged PRLS has been confirmed in only two non-human mammals, both odontocete cetaceans in the family Delphinid...
Article
Full-text available
Place-based conservation can be an effective tool for addressing threats to marine mammals, but this approach presents many challenges, such as the dilemma of whether to aim for protection at appropriately large scales or through networks of smaller protected areas, and how to address the socio-economic conditions of human societies whose welfare m...
Article
The literature on the science-policy interface suggests that stakeholders' perceptions of environmental planning and decision-making processes can affect the uptake of conservation plans. Despite calls for more and better stakeholder engagement in conservation planning there is currently no empirical evidence on participants' perceptions of such pr...
Article
Full-text available
The hunting and trade of bushmeat is a significant issue. The sharing of marine bushmeat between Australian Torres Strait Islanders and their mainland urban diaspora was documented from a diaspora perspective by collecting quantitative and qualitative data from communities in three mainland cities. Motivations for sharing dugong and turtle meat wer...
Article
Full-text available
It is a golden age for animal movement studies and so an opportune time to assess priorities for future work. We assembled 40 experts to identify key questions in this field, focussing on marine megafauna, which include a broad range of birds, mammals, reptiles, and fish. Research on these taxa has both underpinned many of the recent technical deve...
Article
Knowledge of the relationships between environmental forcing and demographic parameters is important for predicting responses from climatic changes and to manage populations effectively. We explore the relationships between the proportion of sea cows (Dugong dugon) classified as calves and four climatic drivers (rainfall anomaly, Southern Oscillati...
Article
Full-text available
It is a golden age for animal movement studies and so an opportune time to assess priorities for future work. We assembled 40 experts to identify key questions in this field, focussing on marine megafauna, which include a broad range of birds, mammals, reptiles, and fish. Research on these taxa has both underpinned many of the recent technical deve...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental issues are often highly politicized. Indigenous peoples may be reluctant to participate in research due to a history of colonization and negative experiences with researchers—described as a “chronic conflict”. We present a case where an acute conflict (an event that creates intense mistrust among stakeholders) occurred during a resear...
Article
Full-text available
Prioritisation methods have been used in conservation planning for over 20 years. The scientific literature focuses on the technical aspects of prioritisation, providing limited information on factors affecting the uptake of priorities. We focused on the Back on Track species prioritisation program in Queensland, Australia, used to prioritise speci...
Article
Full-text available
Incidental capture in fishing gear is the most serious threat to the survival of many species of marine mammals. Fisheries closures developed to protect marine mammals have tended to concentrate on areas of high marine mammal density. Movement corridors have generally been less protected because they are often unknown and difficult to detect. Seagr...
Research
Full-text available
Use of a Sit-down Personal Watercraft to Safely and Quickly Catch Dugongs (Dugong dugon) in the coral reef lagoons of New Caledonia
Technical Report
Full-text available
Link to article: http://nesptropical.edu.au/index.php/round-1-projects/project-3-2/
Technical Report
Full-text available
The pressures on coastal marine mammals are increasing as the world’s human population rises and with it the consequential expansion in world trade and port developments, and the continued movement of people to the coastal zone. Monitoring the effect of coastal development on marine mammals is challenging because: (1) the impacts of coastal develop...
Article
Aerial surveys are often used to estimate wildlife abundance. The probability of detecting an animal during a survey involves two processes: (1) availability bias when animals present in the search area are not available for detection and (2) perception bias, when some animals potentially visible to observers are missed. Estimating these two source...
Research
Full-text available
A report to the Western Australian Department of Environment and Conservation containing an assessment of the efficacy of using aerial surveys to monitor whale shark abundance.
Article
Full-text available
Resources for conserving biodiversity are invariably insufficient. This situation creates the need for transparent, systematic frameworks to help stakeholders prioritize the allocation of resources across multiple management actions. We developed a novel framework that explicitly prioritizes actions to minimize the impacts of several threats across...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the distribution and relative abundance of seagrass communities in the Coral Triangle is limited, despite their global significance and the vital ecosystem services they perform for local human populations, threatened species such as dugongs and green turtles, as well as the role of being a globally significant carbon stock. To address...
Article
[Extract] A global review of tourist visitation and expenditures associated with whale and dolphin watching industries indicated that the industry attracted 13 million tourists in 119 countries and contributed US$ 2.1 billion to the global economy in 2008 (O'Connor et al. 2009). O'Connor et al. (2009) indicated that nine of the 10 countries with th...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity assessments by research scientists are often logistically difficult and expensive to implement in remote areas. Locally-based approaches have the potential to overcome some of these challenges by capitalising on the knowledge and capacity of local people. Many Indigenous people in northern Australia are custodians of coastal areas that...
Article
Full-text available
Australian snubfin and Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins co-occur throughout most of their range in coastal waters of tropical Australia. Little is known of their ecology or acoustic repertoires. Vocalizations from humpback and snubfin dolphins were recorded in two locations along the Queensland coast during 2008 and 2010 to describe their vocalizatio...
Article
Full-text available
Context: Systematic conservation planning is increasingly used to identify priority areas for protection in marine systems. However, ecosystem-based approaches typically use density estimates as surrogates for animal presence and spatial modeling to identify areas for protection and may not take into account daily or seasonal movements of animals....
Article
Management of marine mega-fauna in a changing climate is constrained by a series of uncertainties, often related to climate change projections, ecological responses, and the effectiveness of strategies in alleviating climate change impacts. Uncertainties can be reduced over time through adaptive management. Adaptive management is a framework for re...
Article
Full-text available
Management of marine mega-fauna in a changing climate is constrained by a series of uncertainties, often related to climate change projections, ecological responses, and the effectiveness of strategies in alleviating climate change impacts. Uncertainties can be reduced over time through adaptive management. Adaptive management is a framework for re...
Article
Diving animals are available for detection from above the water when environ-mental conditions are favorable and the animals are near the surface. The number of animals that are unavailable for detection needs to be estimated to obtain unbiased population estimates. The current availability correction factors used in aerial sur-veys for the dugong...
Article
Age and reproductive information for 65 false killer whales stranded in South Africa in 1981 are compared with similar material from 156 animals examined from drive fisheries in Japan in 1979 and 1980. Sizes at birth, sexual maturation, and physical maturity all indicated that both sexes were 10%–20% larger in Japan than South Africa. Females reach...
Article
We investigated phylogeography, demography, and population connectivity of the dugong (Dugong dugon) in Australian waters using mitochondrial control region DNA sequences from 177 Australian dugongs and 11 from elsewhere. The dugong is widespread in shallow Indo-West Pacific waters suitable for growth of its main food, seagrass. We hypothesized tha...
Chapter
The extensive territorial waters of Australia and New Zealands (NZ) (over 8 million km2 for Australia and a further 4 million km2 for NZ) are home to approximately 49 species of whales and dolphins, 11 species of seals and the dugong. Within Australia, at least eight species are listed as threatened, though there is insufficient information on a fu...