Helena L. Filipsson

Helena L. Filipsson
Lund University | LU · Department of Geology

Professor of Marine Geology, Ph.D.

About

108
Publications
23,181
Reads
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2,175
Citations
Citations since 2016
55 Research Items
1634 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Introduction
Professor Helena L. Filipsson currently works at the Department of Geology, Lund University. Her research interests include recent marine environmental changes and she uses the sediment record with its contents of various microfossil to reconstruct past climate and marine environments.
Additional affiliations
September 2007 - present
Lund University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Junior researcher 2007-2011, Associate senior lecturer 2011-2013
February 2004 - February 2006
Universität Bremen
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (108)
Article
Full-text available
Resurrection studies can answer some fundamental questions in aquatic ecology and evolutionary biology. For phytoplankton resting stages, longevity of thousands to millions of years has recently been reported. However, contamination during sediment sampling could distort these estimates, and this risk has not been systematically evaluated. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
Sedimentary molybdenum (Mo) and uranium (U) enrichments are widely used to reconstruct changes in bottom water oxygen conditions in aquatic environments. Until now, most studies using Mo and U have focused on restricted suboxic-euxinic basins and continental margin oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), leaving mildly reducing and oxic (but eutrophic) coasta...
Article
Full-text available
Black carbon (BC), spheroidal carbonaceousparticles (SCP), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)are carbonaceous pollutants affecting the climate, environment,and human health. International regulations limit their emissions,and the present emissions are followed by monitoring programs.However, the monitoring programs have limited spatio-tempo...
Preprint
Certain benthic foraminifera are known to thrive in marine sediments with low oxygen or even without detectable oxygen. Potential survival avenues used by these supposedly aerobic protists include fermentation and anaerobic respiration, although details on their adaptive mechanisms remain somewhat elusive. To better understand the metabolic versati...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen and sulfur are key elements in the biogeochemical cycles of marine ecosystems to which benthic foraminifera contribute significantly. Yet, cell-specific assimilation of ammonium, nitrate and sulfate by these protists is poorly characterized and understood across their wide range of species-specific trophic strategies. For example, detailed...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing occurrences of extreme weather events, such as the 2018 drought over northern Europe, are a concerning issue under global climate change. High-resolution archives of natural hydroclimate proxies, such as rapidly accumulating sediments containing biogenic carbonates, offer the potential to investigate the frequency and mechanisms of such...
Preprint
Full-text available
Increasing occurrences of extreme weather events, such as the 2018 drought over northern Europe, are a concerning issue under global climate change. High resolution archives of natural hydroclimate proxies, such as rapidly accumulating sediments containing biogenic carbonates, offer the potential to investigate the frequency and mechanisms of such...
Article
Full-text available
Climate during the Last Interglacial period (LIG, Marine Isotope Stage 5e) was on average warmer than the present, with a higher global sea level but also more unstable conditions. Today, the Baltic Sea interacts strongly with conditions in the North Atlantic region, and this interaction was likely even stronger during the LIG. We here present a re...
Article
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Hypoxia is of increasing concern in marine areas, calling for a better understanding of mechanisms leading to decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations ([O2]). Much can be learned about the processes and implications of deoxygenation for marine ecosystems using proxy records from low‐oxygen sites, provided proxies, such as the manganese (Mn) to ca...
Article
Full-text available
Despite widespread metal pollution of coastal ecosystems, little is known of its effect on marine phytoplankton. We designed a co-cultivation experiment to test if toxic dose-response relationships can be used to predict the competitive outcome of two species under metal stress. Specifically, we took into account intraspecific strain variation and...
Article
Full-text available
Oceanic deoxygenation is increasingly affecting marine ecosystems; many taxa will be severely challenged, yet certain nominally aerobic foraminifera (rhizarian protists) thrive in oxygen-depleted to anoxic, sometimes sulfidic, sediments uninhabitable to most eukaryotes. Gene expression analyses of foraminifera common to severely hypoxic or anoxic s...
Article
Full-text available
Oxygen and nitrate availabilities impact the marine nitrogen cycle at a range of spatial and temporal scales. Here, we demonstrate the impact of denitrifying foraminifera on the nitrogen cycle at two oxygen and nitrate contrasting stations in a fjord environment (Gullmar Fjord, Sweden). Denitrification by benthic foraminifera was determined through...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen availability often limits biological productivity in marine systems, where inorganic nitrogen, such as ammonium is assimilated into the food web by bacteria and photoautotrophic eukaryotes. Recently, ammonium assimilation was observed in kleptoplast-containing protists of the phylum foraminifera, possibly via the glutamine synthetase/gluta...
Article
This paper presents an age–depth model based on an ultra‐high‐resolution, 80‐m‐thick sedimentary succession from a marine continental shelf basin, the Kattegat. This is an area of dynamic deglaciation of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet during the Late Pleistocene. The Kattegat is also a transitional area between the saline North Sea and the brackish Ba...
Article
Full-text available
The chemical composition of foraminiferal calcite is widely used for studying past environmental conditions and biogeochemistry. However, high rates of microbial organic matter degradation and abundant dissolved metal sources in sediments and pore waters may impede the application of foraminifera-based proxies due to formation of secondary carbonat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Oxygen availability impacts the marine nitrogen cycle at a range of spatial and temporal scales. Invasive organisms have shown to sustainably affect sediment geochemistry and benthic ecology. Nonionella sp. T1 was recently described as an invasive benthic foraminifer in the North Sea region. Here, we demonstrate the impact of this denitrifying spec...
Article
Full-text available
Strains of microalgae vary in traits between species and populations due to adaptation or stochastic processes. Traits of individual strains may also vary depending on the acclimatization state and external forces, such as abiotic stress. In this study we tested how metal tolerance differs among marine diatoms at three organizational levels: specie...
Article
Full-text available
Deoxygenation affects many continental shelf seas across the world today and results in increasing areas of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen concentration ([O2]) <1.4 ml/L). The Baltic Sea is increasingly affected by deoxygenation. Deoxygenation correlates with other environmental variables such as changing water temperature and salinity and is directly l...
Article
Full-text available
The chemical composition of fossil foraminiferal shells (tests) is widely used as tracers for past ocean chemistry. It is, therefore, important to understand how different (trace) elements are transported and incorporated into these tests from adjacent seawater. The elemental distribution within the walls of foraminiferal tests might be used to dif...
Article
Full-text available
The Öresund (the Sound), which is a part of the Danish straits, is linking the marine North Sea and the brackish Baltic Sea. It is a transition zone where ecosystems are subjected to large gradients in terms of salinity, temperature, carbonate chemistry, and dissolved oxygen concentration. In addition to the highly variable environmental conditions...
Poster
Full-text available
Benthic manganese cycle studied with 2D high spatial resolution methods at contrasted oxygen conditions in Gullmar Fjord (Sweden)
Article
Full-text available
The Öresund (the Sound), which is a part of the Danish straits, is linking the marine North Sea and the brackish Baltic Sea. It is a transition zone where ecosystems are subjected to large gradients in terms of salinity, temperature, carbonate chemistry, and dissolved oxygen concentration. In addition to the highly variable environmental conditions...
Article
The genetic diversity, morphology and biogeography of Ammonia specimens was investigated across the Northeast (NE) Atlantic margins, to enhance the regional (palaeo)ecological studies based on this genus. Living specimens were collected from 22 sampling locations ranging from Shetland to Portugal to determine the distribution of Ammonia genetic typ...
Article
Full-text available
The assimilation of inorganic compounds in foraminiferal metabolism compared to predation or organic matter assimilation is unknown. Here we investigate possible inorganic‐compound assimilation in Nonionellina labradorica, a common kleptoplastidic benthic foraminifer from Arctic and North Atlantic sublittoral regions. The objectives were to identif...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean temperatures are rising; species are shifting poleward, and pH is falling (ocean acidification, OA). We summarise current understanding of OA in the brackish Baltic-Skagerrak System, focussing on the direct, indirect and interactive effects of OA with other anthropogenic drivers on marine biogeochemistry, organisms and ecosystems. Substantial...
Article
Full-text available
Major climate and ecological changes affect the world’s oceans leading to a number of responses including increasing water temperatures, changing weather patterns, shrinking ice-sheets, temperature-driven shifts in marine species ranges, biodiversity loss and bleaching of coral reefs. In addition, ocean pH is falling, a process known as ocean acidi...
Article
Full-text available
Current climate and environmental changes strongly affect shallow marine and coastal areas like the Baltic Sea. This has created a need for a context to understand the severity and potential outcomes of such changes. The context can be derived from paleoenvironmental records during periods when comparable events happened in the past. In this study,...
Article
Full-text available
We present 2500 years of reconstructed bottom water temperatures (BWT) using a fjord sediment archive from the north-east Atlantic region. The BWT represent winter conditions due to the fjord hydrography and the associated timing and frequency of bottom water renewals. The study is based on a ca. 8m long sediment core from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), w...
Article
In the context of recent climate change and increased anthropogenic activities in coastal areas, which both may have a negative impact on dissolved oxygen concentration, there is an increased interest to better understand the mechanisms and evolution leading to hypoxia in marine environments. The development of well calibrated proxies is crucial to...
Article
Coastal areas display natural large environmental variability such as frequent changes in salinity, pH, and carbonate chemistry. Anthropogenic impacts - especially ocean acidification - increase this variability, which may affect the living conditions of coastal species, particularly, calcifiers. We performed culture experiments on living benthic f...
Article
Full-text available
Analyses of foraminiferal assemblages have often been implemented on dry samples, which are easy to split. In some cases, the wet-picking method is preferred as it allows the preservation of more foraminiferal forms and facilitates the picking of live foraminifera. However, the increased execution time needed for wet picking may cause micropalaeont...
Article
Full-text available
Sediment records recovered from the Baltic Sea during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 347 provide a unique opportunity to study paleoenvironmental and climate change in central and northern Europe. Such studies contribute to a better understanding of how environmental parameters change in continental shelf seas and enclosed basins. Her...
Article
Full-text available
We report systematic transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations of the cellular ultrastructure of selected, small rotalid benthic foraminifera. Nine species from different environments (intertidal mudflat, fjord, and basin) were investigated: Ammonia sp., Elphidium oceanense, Haynesina germanica, Bulimina marginata, Globobulimina sp., Noni...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Mn/Ca ratios of benthic foraminifera represent an emerging proxy to trace past ocean hypoxia (O2 < 63 µmol/L). The redox element manganese is soluble in its reduced form (Mn2+), therefore Mn can be incorporated into the tests of benthic foraminifera under low oxygen conditions. We studied, in laboratory experiments and by in situ recent observa...
Article
Full-text available
Reproducible climate reconstructions of the Common Era (1 CE to present) are key to placing industrial-era warming into the context of natural climatic variability. Here we present a community-sourced database of temperature-sensitive proxy records from the PAGES2k initiative. The database gathers 692 records from 648 locations, including all conti...
Article
The carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of seawater provides valuable insight on ocean circulation, air-sea exchange, the biological pump and the global carbon cycle, and is reflected by the δ13C of foraminifera tests. Here, more than 1,700 δ13C observations of the benthic foraminifera genus Cibicides from late Holocene sediments (δ13CCibnat) are com...
Article
Full-text available
Sediment records recovered from the Baltic Sea during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 347 provide a unique opportunity to study paleoenvironmental and -climate change in central/northern Europe. Such studies contribute to a better understanding of how environmental parameters change in continental shelf seas and enclosed basins. We pre...
Chapter
Estuarine settings consist of several sub-environments, each of which can be characterized by various groups of microfossils: this chapter focuses on foraminifera, testate amoebae and tintinnids. These groups of protists occur in high abundance and are present through the geological record. Thus, the remains of these protists, when preserved within...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic characterisation (SSU rRNA genotyping) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) imaging of individual tests were used in tandem to determine the modern species richness of the foraminiferal family Elphidiidae (Elphidium, Haynesina and related genera) across the Northeast Atlantic shelf biomes. Specimens were collected at 25 locations from the...
Article
We documented the annual cycle of the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ¹³CDIC) in the water columns of the Skagerrak and Baltic Sea to obtain an increased understanding of the processes involved controlling the carbon isotopic distribution in shelf seas. The lowest δ¹³CDIC values (− 4.9‰) were found in the low-oxygen, bra...
Article
Full-text available
We analysed the long-term variations in grain-size distribution in sediments from Gåsfjärden, a fjord-like inlet in the southwestern Baltic Sea, and explored potential drivers of the recorded changes in the sediment grain-size data. Over the last 5.4 thousand years (ky) in the study region, the relative sea level decreased 17 m, which was caused by...
Article
The evolution of industrial-era warming across the continents and oceans provides a context for future climate change and is important for determining climate sensitivity and the processes that control regional warming. Here we use post 1500 palaeoclimate records to show that sustained industrial-era warming of the tropical oceans first developed...
Article
Full-text available
We analysed long-term variations in grain-size distribution in sediments from Gåsfjärden, a fjord-like inlet on the south-west Baltic Sea, and explored potential drivers of the recorded changes in sediment grain-size data. Over the last 5.4 thousand years (ka), the relative sea level decreased 17 m in the study region, caused by isostatic land upli...
Article
Full-text available
Although bottom water hypoxia (O2<2 mg L-1) is presently widespread in the Baltic Sea coastal zone, there is a lack of insight into past changes in bottom water oxygen in these areas on timescales of millennia, and the possible driving factors. Here, we present a sediment-based environmental reconstruction of surface water productivity, salinity an...
Article
Full-text available
The Benguela Upwelling System (BUS), located between 30-20°S is one of the fundamental high productivity systems of the world ocean. The BUS has previously been studied in terms of primary productivity and ecology over glacial-interglacial timescales, however, the response and coupling with the benthic environment has received little attention. Her...
Data
We analysed Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Ca isotope ratios of benthonic foraminifers from sediment core tops retrieved during several research cruises in the Atlantic Ocean, in order to improve the understanding of isotope fractionation and element partitioning resulting from biomineralisation processes and changes in ambient conditions. Species include forami...
Data
We analysed long-term variations in grain-size distribution in sediments from Gåsfjärden, a fjord-like inlet on the south-west Baltic Sea, and explored potential drivers of the recorded changes in sediment grain-size data. Over the last 5.4 thousand years (ka), the relative sea level decreased 17 m in the study region, caused by isostatic land upli...
Article
We reconstructed the past coastal environment of the Baltic Sea from c. 7300 to 3500 cal. a BP, with a focus on sea surface salinity (SSS). To quantitatively determine the SSS, two methods were employed: measurements of 87Sr/86Sr ratios in mollusc shells (SSSSr) and process length variations of dinoflagellate cysts Operculodinium centrocarpum (SSSp...
Article
We analysed Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Ca isotope ratios of benthonic foraminifers from sediment core tops retrieved during several research cruises in the Atlantic Ocean, in order to improve the understanding of isotope fractionation and element partitioning resulting from biomineralisation processes and changes in ambient conditions. Species include forami...