Helen Russell

Helen Russell
Economic and Social Research Institute | ESRI · Social Research

PhD

About

114
Publications
49,745
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2,055
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - present
Trinity College Dublin
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 1999 - present
Economic and Social Research Institute
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (114)
Article
Full-text available
Recent rapid economic growth in Ireland has been accompanied by a strong surge in the number of women in employment, and this has led to a significant increase in the proportion of dual-earner families. These changes have brought the issue of reconciliation between work and care commitments to the fore. Flexible working arrangements in firms have b...
Article
Full-text available
We examine the relationship between ‘flexicurity’ systems, unemployment and well-being outcomes for young people in Europe. A key tenet of the flexicurity approach is that greater flexibility of labour supply supports transitions into employment, trading longer-term employment stability for short-term job instability. However, there is a risk that...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the role that home-learning activities (HLAs) play in the relationship between social origin and cognitive development using an Irish birth cohort study, Growing Up in Ireland. Numerous studies using different measures of the home-learning environment (HLE) have shown that it has considerable influence on young children's cogn...
Book
Full-text available
The report draws on the Growing Up in Ireland longitudinal study to document the nature and the quality of father-child relationships from infancy to middle childhood and to examine the role of fathers in children’s outcomes.
Book
Full-text available
Adequate housing is essential to the quality of life of individuals and families. Housing provides safety and shelter and underpins people’s ability to hold employment, participate in education, and otherwise engage with civil society. Housing precarity and housing deprivation are associated with poor mental health, poor physical health, precarity,...
Article
Full-text available
COVID-19 has resulted in a global public health crisis. Measures adopted by governments across the world to reduce transmission have resulted in the closure of educational institutions and workplaces and reduced social interaction. The aim of the article is to reflect on the consequences of the COVID-19 global pandemic for the lives of young people...
Book
Full-text available
This report considers decent work in Ireland in the context of international obligations about core minimum standards of work and non-discrimination. Following a review of international measurement frameworks and a broad consultation in Ireland, the authors develop a set of indicators and then provide baseline figures on access to work, adequate ea...
Book
Full-text available
This study profiles the duration of exposure to poverty during childhood and identifies the families most at risk of persistent poverty. It also examines the factors that trigger moves into and out of poverty and explores the consequences of poverty for children across a wide range of domains. The study draws on data from both cohorts of the Growin...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper estimates the raw and adjusted gender pay gap in Ireland between 2011 and 2018, a period of austerity measures and recovery from the Great Recession. Using survey data sources linked to administrative information on earnings, we show that the raw gender wage gap across the wage distribution has not changed much over this period: it is la...
Book
Full-text available
This report examines the early impact of Covid19 on migrants in Ireland. It explores both labour market and health issues. It measures the extent to which migrants are key workers and are in occupations that allow working from home. The study also compares the risk of job loss and temporary lay offs among non-Irish national groups. The fall in empl...
Article
Full-text available
Despite national differences in youth employment, many countries share striking similarities in the uneven sectoral distribution of job opportunities for young women and men in Europe. A shift‐share analysis of European Labour Force data identifies “youth‐friendly” sectors, how this varies between countries, and how this changed during the Great Re...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter adopts a critical perspective on policymaking in European labor markets before, during, and after the Great Recession. Using extensive analysis of recent policies at the flexibility–security interface, the chapter identifies four key weaknesses in relation to young people: There was an over-reliance on supply-side policies and quantita...
Chapter
Full-text available
Jobs for young people are very unevenly distributed across economic sectors. Regardless of country differences, there are striking similarities in this uneven sectorial distribution. Little attention has been given to understanding the changing composition of “youth-friendly” sectors for youth labor transitions. Using a shift-share analysis, this c...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we draw on Irish SILC data to examine the roles of social class, non-class risk groups and state policies in influencing enforced material deprivation as Ireland moved from a period of economic boom through deep recession and on to early recovery. We also employ Sen’s capability approach to explore the extent to which certain social...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction Given the changing nature of employment, including the long term shift from manufacturing and agriculture to the service sector, an increasing proportion of the workforce is engaged in employment which is less physically demanding but which brings with it a range of stress-related and psycho-social risks. Eurofound (2006) estimated tha...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction In Ireland between 2002–2013, Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) accounted for 50% of self-reported work-related illnesses. Moreover the average number of days absent (15.9 days) was higher than the average of 12.8 days for all other illnesses (except stress, anxiety and depression). Methods This paper examines trends and determinants fo...
Book
Full-text available
This report examines the attitudes of Irish-born people to immigration and immigrants over the period 2002 to 2014 using the European Social Survey. It finds that attitudes to the impact of immigration and to immigrants became more negative during the recession, and by 2014 were somewhat less positive than the average in 10 Western European countri...
Book
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Women make up the majority of those employed in the civil service but are underrepresented at the most senior grades, where key policy and operational decisions are taken. Action 8 of the Civil Service Renewal Plan commits to improving gender balance at each level, including senior grades. The present study was commissioned by a high-level steering...
Article
Full-text available
This paper formed part of the conference to mark 50 years of social research at the ESRI. It provides an overview of gender equality in the labour market in Ireland over a 50-year period. It takes as its starting point two studies published by ESRI researchers in the early 1970s including a survey of women carried out in 1973. Five themes are ident...
Book
Full-text available
The study examines perceived discrimination at work, looking for work, accessing public and private services across groups covered by equality legislation. Highest levels of discrimination are experienced by members of the Travelling Community, those of Black ethnicity and people with a disability. The report also tracks change over time since 2004...
Chapter
Full-text available
It is well established that unemployment and insecurity have a negative impact on well-being. Yet it has been proposed that unemployment hits young people less hard, psychologically speaking, because work is not as central to their identity and because they have fewer financial responsibilities than prime-age workers. If this is true, then the high...
Chapter
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Surprising little attention has been given to understanding which employers recruit young people. Valuable cross-national comparisons of differences in training and recruitment show that where young people are better integrated into employment, employers are more actively involved in providing apprenticeship schemes. But, can we assume that all emp...
Article
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The issue of multidimensionality is well established in poverty research, and it is generally recognised that income alone is inadequate as a measure of social inclusion or quality of life (QoL). However, social policy still tends to address the different dimensions of QoL—such as poverty, health, housing and social cohesion—in isolation. This rais...
Chapter
Full-text available
Both psychological and sociological accounts have suggested that the home learning environment play an important role in children’s cognitive development and may provide insights into inequalities in cognitive outcomes. Using the infant cohort of the Growing Up in Ireland Study (GUI) , this chapter investigates firstly if differences in the home le...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter examines social inclusion among the migrant population in Ireland. Social inclusion is broadly conceived as the ability of an individual to participate fully in society. We use a range of indicators to asses social inclusion including mean equivalised income, income poverty, material deprivation, home ownership, housing quality and sel...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter examines satisfaction with work-life balance in a comparative perspective, drawing on employment and welfare regime theories. The chapter pays particular attention to working conditions and finds that factors such as working hours and level of autonomy are strongly predictive of satisfaction with work-life balance. The chapter also inv...