Helen Henshaw

Helen Henshaw
University of Nottingham | Notts · NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre

PhD Psychology

About

42
Publications
19,585
Reads
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1,183
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
953 Citations
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Introduction
I am Principal Research Fellow, a Chartered Psychologist, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Career Development Fellow and NIHR CRN East Midlands Specialty Lead for ENT. My research spans adult aural rehabilitation, cognition, neural plasticity, and health behaviour change. I work with clinical and academic colleagues at the NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Centre & Hearing Sciences, University of Nottingham. https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/medicine/people/helen.henshaw
Additional affiliations
February 2019 - present
NIHR Clinical Research Network (CRN)
Position
  • ENT Specialty Lead
October 2018 - present
National Institute for Health Research
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Career Development Fellow
September 2009 - January 2022
University of Nottingham
Position
  • Principal Investigator
Description
  • Principal Research Fellow in Hearing Sciences at the NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, School of Medicine.

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Background: Auditory training involves active listening to auditory stimuli and aims to improve performance in auditory tasks. As such, auditory training is a potential intervention for the management of people with hearing loss. Objective: This systematic review (PROSPERO 2011: CRD42011001406) evaluated the published evidence-base for the efficacy...
Article
Full-text available
This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the efficacy of auditory training and cognitive training to improve cognitive function in adults with hearing loss. A literature search of academic databases (e.g., MEDLINE, Scopus) and gray literature (e.g., OpenGrey) identified relevant articles published up to January 25, 2018. Randomized control...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Hearing loss is a chronic condition affecting 12 million individuals in the UK. People with hearing loss regularly experience difficulties interacting in everyday conversations. These difficulties in communication can result in a person with hearing loss withdrawing from social situations and becoming isolated. While hearing loss resea...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Performance on working memory tasks is positively associated with speech-in-noise perception performance, particularly where auditory inputs are degraded. It is suggested that interventions designed to improve working memory capacity may improve domain-general working memory performance for people with hearing loss, to benefit their rea...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Hearing aids are the gold standard treatment to help manage hearing loss. However, not everyone who needs them has them, and of those who do, a significant proportion of people do not use them at all, or use them infrequently. Despite literature reviews listing key barriers and enablers to the uptake and use of hearing aids, there is l...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Making health-related decisions can be difficult due to the amount and complexity of information available. Audio-visual information may improve memory for health information but whether audio-visual information can enhance health-related decisions has not been explored using quantitative methods. The objective of this systematic rev...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: To examine the benefits of home-delivered auditory training for adult hearing aid users using live-voice conversations in the presence of a single-talker distractor (experimental group) or in quiet (active-control group). Design: Randomised controlled trial. The experimental group held conversations with their nominated communication...
Article
Full-text available
Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of a corresponding external sound source, and bothersome tinnitus has been linked to poorer cognitive performance. This review comprehensively quantifies the association between tinnitus and different domains of cognitive performance. The review protocol was preregistered and published in a peer-re...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To determine research priorities in hyperacusis that key stakeholders agree are the most important. Design/setting A priority setting partnership using two international surveys, and a UK prioritisation workshop, adhering to the six-staged methodology outlined by the James Lind Alliance. Participants People with lived experience of hype...
Preprint
Full-text available
ABTRACT Introduction: Hearing loss is a chronic condition affecting 11 million individuals in the UK. People with hearing loss regularly experience difficulties interacting in everyday conversations. These difficulties in communication can result in a person with hearing loss withdrawing from social situations and becoming isolated. While hearing h...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The aim of this research was to develop and evaluate methods to address poor knowledge of hearing aids, hearing loss, and communication in patients, partners, and nonaudiologic health and social care professionals. Method An interactive multimedia educational program (C2Hear) has been co-produced with hearing aid users and audiologists to...
Article
More than a decade after Arthur Boothroyd published “Adult Aural Rehabilitation: What Is It and Does It Work?,” the four cornerstones of adult aural rehabilitation are re-examined in terms of research that we and others in the field have undertaken. The focus is on novel advances in high-quality research relating to interventions to support self-ma...
Data
Supplemental material for Auditory and Cognitive Training for Cognition in Adults With Hearing Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Subjective tinnitus is very common and has a number of comorbid associations including depression, sleep disturbance and concentration difficulties. Concentration difficulties may be observable in people with tinnitus through poorer behavioural performance in tasks thought to measure specific cognitive domains such as attention and mem...
Article
Full-text available
Published studies assessing the association between cognitive performance and speech-in-noise perception examine different aspects of each, test different listeners, and often report quite variable associations. By examining the published evidence base using a systematic approach, we aim to identify robust patterns across studies and highlight any...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: In recent years, there has been an increase in the application of behavioural models, such as social cognition models, to the promotion of hearing health. Despite this, there exists a well-developed body of literature that suggests such models may fail to consistently explain reliable amounts of variability in human behaviours. Design:...
Article
Full-text available
Good speech perception and communication skills in everyday life are crucial for participation and well-being, and are therefore an overarching aim of auditory rehabilitation. Both behavioural and self-report measures can be used to assess these skills. However, correlations between behavioural and self-report speech perception measures are often l...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: This study explored the psychosocial experiences of adults with hearing loss using the self-regulatory model as a theoretical framework. The primary components of the model, namely cognitive representations, emotional representations, and coping responses, were examined. Design: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted. Th...
Article
The publisher regrets an error with the wording in the last line in the Abstract in the above article in Seminars in Hearing, Volume 36, Number 4, 2015, p. 237.
Article
Full-text available
Auditory training aims to compensate for degradation in the auditory signal and is offered as an intervention to help alleviate the most common complaint in people with hearing loss, understanding speech in a background noise. Yet there remain many unanswered questions. This article reviews some of the key pieces of evidence that assess the evidenc...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To examine accessibility, use and adherence to computerised and online interventions for people with hearing loss. Method: Four intervention studies of people with hearing loss were examined: two auditory training studies, one working memory training study, and one study of multimedia educational support. Results: A small proportion (~15...
Article
Full-text available
Hearing aid intervention typically occurs after significant delay, or not at all, resulting in an unmet need for many people with hearing loss. Computer-based auditory training (CBAT) may provide generalized benefits to real-world listening, particularly in adverse listening conditions, and can be conveniently delivered in the home environment. Yet...
Article
Full-text available
Listeners vary in their ability to understand speech in noisy environments. Hearing sensitivity, as measured by pure-tone audiometry, can only partly explain these results, and cognition has emerged as another key concept. Although cognition relates to speech perception, the exact nature of the relationship remains to be fully understood. This stud...
Article
Full-text available
The results show that hearing loss can lead to participation difficulties in various social domains, including work, friendship and family. Most of the interviewees with hearing loss successfully participated in some social domains, but struggled in other social domains. This was particularly problematic when they struggled in the social domains th...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory training (AT) helps compensate for degradation in the auditory signal. A series of three high-quality training studies are discussed, which include, (i) a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of phoneme discrimination in quiet that trained adults with mild hearing loss (n = 44), (ii) a repeated measures study that trained phoneme discriminati...
Article
Full-text available
The aims of this study were to (i) evaluate the efficacy of phoneme discrimination training for hearing and cognitive abilities of adults aged 50 to 74 years with mild sensorineural hearing loss who were not users of hearing aids, and to (ii) determine participant compliance with a self-administered, computer-delivered, home- and game-based auditor...
Article
Full-text available
One in ten people aged between 55 to 74 years have a significant hearing impairment in their better hearing ear (as defined by audiometric hearing thresholds). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the challenges faced by older listeners cannot be explained by the audiogram alone. The ability for people with hearing loss to use cognition...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Auditory training is an intervention that aims to improve auditory performance and help alleviate the difficulties associated with hearing loss. To be an effective intervention, any task-specific learning needs to transfer to functional benefits in real-world listening. The present study aimed to identify optimal outcome measures to assess the bene...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory training involves active listening to auditory stimuli and aims to improve performance in auditory tasks. As such, auditory training is a potential intervention for the management of people with hearing loss. This systematic review (PROSPERO 2011: CRD42011001406) evaluated the published evidence-base for the efficacy of individual computer...
Data
Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) Checklist. (DOC)
Data
Example terms used to search the PubMed database. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Background The use of personal computers (PCs) and the Internet to provide health care information and interventions has increased substantially over the past decade. Yet the effectiveness of such an approach is highly dependent upon whether the target population has both access and the skill set required to use this technology. This is particularl...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The use of personal computers (PCs) and the Internet to provide health care information and interventions has increased substantially over the past decade. Yet the effectiveness of such an approach is highly dependent upon whether the target population has both access and the skill set required to use this technology. This is particular...
Article
Full-text available
We describe a task used to educate the public on the importance of hearing and the experience of hearing loss. During an open day at Nottingham University, participants were presented with verbal instructions (with or without a background masker) and asked to draw the image of a clock face as accurately as possible. Poorest performance was observed...

Network

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Projects

Projects (9)
Project
Our working group was created by the British Society of Audiology to understand accessibility, communication and deaf awareness in the NHS. The group consists of patients, clinicians, researchers and charity representatives. Overall, this group aims to create recommendations and strategies to improve the healthcare experience for deaf people. 
Project
Funded by Research England this project will: 1. Co-create and refine intervention content to prepare, inform and support patients before and after hearing aid fitting 2. Gather in-depth feedback on the intervention content with NHS patients This project is being conducted alongside a Patient Research Partner.
Project
Hearing loss has been identified as the leading potentially modifiable contributor to dementia risk in midlife. Supported via competitive awards from multiple funders, this research area will identify pragmatic and priority research agendas for coexisting dementia and hearing loss, and develop strategies and tools to guide future research methods, trials and care approaches.