Heleen Oudemans

Heleen Oudemans
Amsterdam University Medical Center | VUmc · Department of Adult Intensive Care

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219
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Publications

Publications (219)
Article
Full-text available
Background Hypovitaminosis C and vitamin C deficiency are common in critically ill patients and associated with organ dysfunction. Low vitamin C status often goes unnoticed because determination is challenging. The static oxidation reduction potential (sORP) reflects the amount of oxidative stress in the blood and is a potential suitable surrogate...
Article
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Background High-dose intravenous vitamin C directly scavenges and decreases the production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during ischemia/reperfusion after a cardiac arrest. The aim of this study is to investigate whether short-term treatment with a supplementary or very high-dose intravenous vitamin C reduces organ failure in p...
Article
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Background: Gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction is frequent in the critically ill but can be overlooked as a result of the lack of standardization of the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. We aimed to develop a research agenda for GI dysfunction for future research. We systematically reviewed the current knowledge on a broad range of subtopics f...
Article
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Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a validated method to assess body composition in persons with fluid homeostasis and reliable body weight. This is not the case during critical illness. The raw BIA markers resistance, reactance, phase angle, and vector length are body weight independent. Phase angle reflects cellular health and has prognost...
Article
Objectives: In critically ill patients, treatment dose or intensity is often related to severity of illness and mortality risk, whereas overtreatment or undertreatment (relative to the individual need) may further increase the odds of death. We aimed to investigate how these relationships affect the results of common statistical methods used in ob...
Article
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Importance: Ischemic heart disease is a common cause of cardiac arrest. However, randomized data on long-term clinical outcomes of immediate coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest in the absence of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are lacking. O...
Chapter
Imaging methods are widely known and used in medical care as well as in ICU patients. However, they are less known for their potential to assess and monitor nutritional status and specifically muscle mass. A variety of imaging methods is available, with typical differences in accuracy, availability, costs, expertise, limitations, and time. Widely u...
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Metabolic alterations in the critically ill have been studied for more than a century, but the heterogeneity of the critically ill patient population, the varying duration and severity of the acute phase of illness, and the many confounding factors have hindered progress in the field. These factors may explain why management of metabolic alteration...
Article
Background: The prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) has been an area of intense research, but the heterogeneity of endpoints used to define catheter infection makes the interpretation of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) problematic. Objectives: To determine the validity of different endpoints for central venous cathet...
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Background & aims: Optimal nutritional support during the acute phase of critical illness remains controversial. We hypothesized that patients with low skeletal muscle area and -density may specifically benefit from early high protein intake. Aim of the present study was to determine the association between early protein intake (day 2-4) and morta...
Article
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Background & aims Low muscle mass and -quality on ICU admission, as assessed by muscle area and -density on CT-scanning at lumbar level 3 (L3), are associated with increased mortality. However, CT-scan analysis is not feasible for standard care. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) assesses body composition by incorporating the raw measurements r...
Article
Background: Restart of renal replacement therapy (RRT) after initial discontinuation of continuous RRT (CRRT) is frequently needed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether renal markers after discontinuation of CRRT can predict restart of RRT within 90 days. Methods: Prospective multicenter observational study in 90 patients, alive,...
Article
Background/objectives: During continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH), there is unwanted loss of amino acids (AA) in the ultrafiltrate (UF). Solutes may also be removed by adsorption to the filter membrane. The aim was to quantify the total loss of AA via the CVVH circuit using a high-flux polysulfone membrane and to differentiate between the...
Article
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Vitamin C deficiency is common in critically ill patients. Vitamin C, the most important antioxidant, is likely consumed during oxidative stress and deficiency is associated with organ dysfunction and mortality. Assessment of vitamin C status may be important to identify patients who might benefit from vitamin C administration. Up to now, vitamin C...
Article
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Background Prediction of successful discontinuation of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) might reduce complications of over- and under-treatment. The aim of this study was to identify renal and non-renal predictors of short-term successful discontinuation of CRRT in patients in whom CRRT was stopped because renal recovery was expected and...
Article
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BACKGROUND Ischemic heart disease is a major cause of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The role of immediate coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the treatment of patients who have been successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest in the absence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remains uncertain...
Article
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Background: In clinical practice, oxygen is generally administered to patients with the intention of increasing oxygen delivery. Supplemental oxygen may, however, cause arterial hyperoxia, which is associated with hemodynamic alterations. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature to determine the effect of hyperoxia on c...
Article
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Background Arterial hyperoxia may induce vasoconstriction and reduce cardiac output, which is particularly undesirable in patients who already have compromised perfusion of vital organs. Due to the inaccessibility of vital organs in humans, vasoconstrictive effects of hyperoxia have primarily been studied in animal models. However, the results of t...
Article
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Background & aims: High protein delivery during early critical illness is associated with lower mortality, while energy overfeeding is associated with higher mortality. Protein-to-energy ratios of traditional enteral formulae are sometimes too low to reach protein targets without energy overfeeding. This prospective feasibility study aimed to eval...
Article
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Purpose Patients with reduced muscle mass have a worse outcome, but muscle mass is difficult to quantify in the ICU. Urinary creatinine excretion (UCE) reflects muscle mass, but has not been studied in critically ill patients. We evaluated the relation of baseline UCE with short-term and long-term mortality in patients admitted to our ICU. Methods...
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Background & aims: Indirect calorimetry is recommended to measure energy expenditure (EE) in critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients. The most validated system, the Deltatrac® (Datex-Ohmeda, Helsinki, Finland) is no longer in production. We tested the agreement of a new breath-by-breath metabolic monitor E-sCOVX® (GE healthcare, Helsinki,...
Article
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Introduction: Shock is characterized by micro- and macrovascular flow impairment contributing to acute kidney injury (AKI). Routine monitoring of the circulation regards the macrocirculation but not the renal circulation which can be assessed with Doppler ultrasound as renal resistive index (RRI). RRI reflects resistance to flow. High RRI predicts...
Article
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Background/objectives: A low bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA)-derived phase angle (PA) predicts morbidity and mortality in different patient groups. An association between PA and long-term mortality in ICU patients has not been demonstrated before. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether PA on ICU admission independently pr...
Article
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Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates shock. Diagnosis is based on rising creatinine, a late phenomenon. Intrarenal vasoconstriction occurs earlier. Measuring flow resistance in the renal circulation, Renal Resistive Index (RRI), could become part of vital organ function assessment using Doppler ultrasound. Our aim was to determine wheth...
Data
ROC curves of seven most significant univariate predictors of AKI stage 2 and 3. (TIF)
Data
Multivariate regression analysis for AKI stage 2 and 3 including pre-admission eGFR. Chronic renal insufficiency is an important risk factor for AKI. On request of the reviewer, we therefore performed an additional multivariate analysis including pre-admission eGFR (as measured with the CKD EPI method) in addition to the most significant other vari...
Article
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Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT) is associated with high mortality. The creatinine-based stage of AKI is considered when deciding to start or delay RRT. However, creatinine is not only determined by renal function (excretion), but also by dilution (fluid balance) and creatinine generation (muscle mass...
Article
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Purpose of review: Hypovitaminosis C and vitamin C deficiency are very common in critically ill patients due to increased needs and decreased intake. Because vitamin C has pleiotropic functions, deficiency can aggravate the severity of illness and hamper recovery. Recent findings: Vitamin C is a key circulating antioxidant with anti-inflammatory...
Article
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This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2018. Other selected articles can be found online at https://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/annualupdate2018 . Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/s...
Article
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PurposeAlthough the definition of septic shock has been standardized, some variation in mortality rates among clinical trials is expected. Insights into the sources of heterogeneity may influence the design and interpretation of septic shock studies. We set out to identify inclusion criteria and baseline characteristics associated with between-tria...
Article
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Recent trials have sparked new interest in an old concept – vitamin therapy in critical illness or “metabolic resuscitation”. In this mini-review, we summarize data on the most promising players in this setting: thiamine (vitamin B1), vitamin C and vitamin D.
Chapter
This chapter summarizes different aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction in critically ill patients. Daily evaluation of the abdomen and monitoring of the amount and the aspect of faeces and lost GI secretions are the mainstay of assessment of GI (dys)function; no single reliable test is available. Knowledge on pathophysiology is needed to in...
Article
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PurposeTo provide evidence-based guidelines for early enteral nutrition (EEN) during critical illness. Methods We aimed to compare EEN vs. early parenteral nutrition (PN) and vs. delayed EN. We defined “early” EN as EN started within 48 h independent of type or amount. We listed, a priori, conditions in which EN is often delayed, and performed syst...
Article
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Background The sequential organ failure assessment score (SOFA) is increasingly used as an endpoint in intensive care randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Although serially measured SOFA is independently associated with mortality in observational cohorts, the association between treatment effects on SOFA vs. effects on mortality has not yet been qu...
Article
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The French Intensive Care Society organized its yearly Paris International Conference in intensive care on June 18-19, 2015. The main purpose of this meeting is to gather the best experts in the field in order to provide the highest quality update on a chosen topic. In 2015, the selected theme was: "Acute Renal Failure in the ICU: from injury to re...
Article
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Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Objectives: To determine and update previous recommendations for the prevention of AKI, specifically the role of fluids, diuretics, inotropes, vasopressors/vasodilators, hormonal and nutritional interventions, sedatives, stati...
Article
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Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of critical illness and carries a significant risk of short- and long-term mortality, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular events. The degree of renal recovery from AKI may substantially affect these long-term endpoints. Therefore maximising recovery of renal function should be the goa...
Article
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Background Hyperoxia, an arterial oxygen pressure of more than 100 mmHg or 13% O2, frequently occurs in hospitalized patients due to administration of supplemental oxygen. Increasing evidence suggests that hyperoxia induces vasoconstriction in the systemic (micro)circulation, potentially affecting organ perfusion. This study addresses effects of hy...
Article
Background: Concerns have been expressed regarding a possible association between arterial hyperoxia and adverse outcomes in critically ill patients. Oxygen status is commonly monitored noninvasively by peripheral saturation monitoring (SpO2). However, the risk of hyperoxia above specific SpO2 levels in critically ill patients is unknown. The purp...
Article
To the Editor In the randomized clinical trial among critically ill patients comparing conservative (partial arterial oxygen pressure [Pao2] of 70-100 mm Hg or arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation [Spo2] of 94%-98%) with conventional (Pao2 of<150 mm Hg or Spo2 of 97%-100%) oxygen therapy, Dr Girardis and colleagues¹ observed an absolute decrease in in...