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Helaine W. Marshall

Helaine W. Marshall
Long Island University - Hudson Graduate Campus

Ph.D

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20
Publications
18,013
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281
Citations

Publications

Publications (20)
Chapter
Flipped learning is an innovative educational model in which content that is traditionally presented in class is completed at home, and in class, students work on applying what they have learned at home to engage in interactive and collaborative activities. Over the past five years, flipped learning has found a strong voice within the field of the...
Chapter
This chapter introduces a unique method of flipping movies in an advanced intermediate-level speaking and listening course. The adolescent students at a language school in northeastern Morocco participate in viewing films together in class, along with pre-class activities that are flipped to prepare them for the language and themes of the films. Th...
Chapter
Flipped learning is an innovative educational model in which content that is traditionally presented in class is completed at home, and in class, students work on applying what they have learned at home to engage in interactive and collaborative activities. Over the past five years, flipped learning has found a strong voice within the field of the...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports on one teacher’s journey, Nan’s, as she struggled to provide appropriate instruction to low-literate day laborers in an English as a second language (ESL) class for adult learners. In her efforts to do so, Nan became inspired to implement alternative pedagogy based on a culturally responsive approach that resonated strongly wit...
Article
Full-text available
As the use of flipped learning spreads throughout educational disciplines, TESOL educators need to consider its potential for our field. This article, based on a computer-aided language learning (CALL) interest session at TESOL 2015, first looks at how best to describe and define flipped learning and examines the factors needed to make it effective...
Article
Full-text available
U.S. schools face increasing pressure to ensure that all students succeed, yet the dropout rate for English learners is alarmingly high, especially for those with limited or interrupted formal schooling (SLIFE). Serving SLIFE can be challenging because they not only need to master language and content but also need to develop literacy skills and le...
Article
Full-text available
Content-area teachers are often frustrated because they have low-performing English language learners (ELLs) in their classes and they don’t know what to do to address their needs. As the number of ELLs continues to grow in U.S. schools, such concerns will increase, especially with the parallel growth in the number of students who have limited or i...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the engagement of one teacher with the Mutually Adaptive Learning Paradigm (MALP) in community adult basic education ESL literacy programs and her development as she implemented this model in a community-based adult language and literacy program for Haitians. We adopt a qualitative methodology to study teacher practices consiste...
Article
Full-text available
The United States is receiving unprecedented numbers of immigrants, with a parallel increase in the number of English-language learners (ELLs) entering our schools. Many of these ELLs are students with limited or interrupted formal education who face great challenges, especially at the secondary level where they have little time to master academic...
Article
Full-text available
Considerable attention has focused on the challenges of English language learners without age-appropriate formal education and first language literacy. They are viewed here as students with high-context learning experiences and expectations (Hall in Beyond culture, Anchor, New York, 1976), and a collectivistic orientation, with a pragmatic, rather...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports on the results of a 5-month intervention in one high school class of English language learners (ELLs) with limited or interrupted formal education using an instructional model developed by the authors. These students are a challen- ging group for educators, especially at the high school level because they must master content kn...
Article
Full-text available
The Newcomer Booklet has become a popular classroom activity among ESL teachers at many different levels and with many types of learners. In this article, we explore why this is the case and why this type of project works so well for a particular population of English language learners, those with limited or interrupted formal schooling. We situate...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies (Goldstein, 1985; Rumbaut and Ima, 1988; Walker, 1989; Trueba, Jacobs, and Kirton, 1990 and Walker-Moffat, 1995) have found that the Hmong have extreme difficulties adjusting to the American educational system as compared with other language minority groups. Underlying this difficulty is a fundamental conflict between learning in t...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The report describes and assesses an adult literacy program for Hmong immigrant adults in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The overall approach was to assist students in developing a new communication system using principles of intercultural communication and community networking. The instructional model had four components: native language literacy instructi...
Chapter
A common cause of confusion for the learner of English as a second language (ESL) is the discrepancy between the rules learned in the classroom and the English used by native speakers outside the classroom. The mismatch is often the result of sociolinguistic factors that operate in spoken American English, causing native speakers to “break” the rul...
Article
The writing of ESL students, while sophisticated in some respects, often contains fragments and run-ons. Because these students have no reliable, self-monitoring system for analyzing their writing and because they believe they are communicating effectively, they fail to recognize their difficulties in forming complete sentences. This paper discusse...
Article
Microfilm reproduction: Ann Arbor, Mich. : University Microfilms International, 1980. 1 microfilm reel ; 35 mm. Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University, 1979. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 374-380).

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Establish the Intercultural Communication Framework (ICF) and the Mutually Adaptive Learning Paradigm (MALP) as effective interventions for low-literate, limited formally schooled adult refugees.