Heike Schroeder

Heike Schroeder
University of East Anglia | UEA · School of International Development

PhD in political science

About

86
Publications
59,194
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
6,239
Citations
Citations since 2017
29 Research Items
3653 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
Additional affiliations
June 2011 - present
University of East Anglia
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
April 2007 - May 2011
University of Oxford
Position
  • Senior Researcher
November 2003 - March 2007
University of California, Santa Barbara
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (86)
Article
Full-text available
The gap between the internationally agreed climate objectives and tangible emissions reductions looms large. We explore how the supreme decision‐making body of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the Conference of the Parties (COP), could develop to promote more effective climate policy. We argue that promoting imple...
Article
Full-text available
Background The transition of the Ruhr region in Germany from a hard coal belt into a knowledge-based economy with a dynamic service sector and state of the art universities over the past 60–80 years has been widely touted as a successful example of how just and fair low carbon energy transitions can unfold. Methods This paper leverages documentary...
Article
Full-text available
“The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again but expecting different results.” This quote by Albert Einstein highlights our need for new formats of communication to address the knowledge-action gap regarding climate change and other sustainability challenges. This includes reflection, and communication spaces, as well as...
Technical Report
Full-text available
UN Climate Change conferences, known as “COPs,” are the primary international venue for negotiating how countries should act and cooperate to avoid dangerous climate change. Although the climate negotiations are a state government-led process, the need for engagement with non-governmental stakeholders in acknowledgement of the critical role in impl...
Article
As national efforts to reduce CO2 emissions intensify, policy-makers need increasingly specific, subnational information about the sources of CO2 and the potential reductions and economic implications of different possible policies. This is particularly true in China, a large and economically diverse country that has rapidly industrialized and urba...
Chapter
Three decades of effort to govern climate change has led to a significant evolution of actor networks, rule-making systems, and rules from international to local levels of governance to address this unprecedented global challenge. Yet, global emissions of greenhouse gases continue to increase year by year. This chapter provides an overview of clima...
Article
Full-text available
Technological and policy solutions for transitioning to a fossil-free society exist, many countries could afford the transition, and rational arguments for rapid climate action abound. Yet effective action is still lacking. Dominant policy approaches have failed to generate action at anywhere near the rate, scale or depth needed to avoid potentiall...
Article
Transnational climate change initiatives have increased in number and relevance within the global climate change regime. Despite being largely welcomed, there are concerns about their ability to deliver ambitious climate action and about their democratic legitimacy. This paper disentangles the nature of both authority and legitimacy of a specific f...
Article
REDD+ has been evolving since 2005, yet its outcomes and effectiveness in reducing deforestation and/or achieving co-benefits are still unclear. The academic literature has focused a great deal on the politics and performance of REDD+ recipient countries and on-the-ground implementation, but less so on REDD+ donor countries and not on the question...
Article
Full-text available
p>The social sciences have engaged since the late 1980s in international collaborative programmes to study questions of sustainability and global change. This article offers an in-depth analysis of the largest long-standing social-science network in this field: the Earth System Governance Project. Originating as a core project of the former Interna...
Article
This study examines traditional indigenous ontologies of territoriality based on a number of indigenous communities in Bolivia and Colombia to show how they can inform effective implementation of REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation plus sustainable forest management, forest conservation and enhancing forest carbon st...
Article
This article takes stock of the evolution of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) through the prism of three recent shifts: the move away from targeting industrial country emissions in a legally binding manner under the Kyoto Protocol to mandating voluntary contributions from all countries under the Paris Agreement; th...
Article
Full-text available
A national interpretation process involving diverse actors and interests is required to transform global environmental initiatives into policies appropriate to the national or subnational context. These processes of lo-calising norms are critical spaces to formulate equitable pathways to environmental conservation, yet have received limited attenti...
Article
Full-text available
As national efforts to reduce CO2 emissions intensify, policy-makers need increasingly specific, subnational information about the sources of CO2 and the potential reductions and economic implications of different possible policies. This is particularly true in China, a large and economically diverse country that has rapidly industrialized and urba...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the dissonance between conceptions of justice among forest-adjacent communities and their representation in global forest policies, a persistent barrier to delivering just sustainability. We empirically track justice claims of rural villagers upwards through specific intermediaries or 'justice brokers': civil society, state, or...
Article
Frequent modifications to energy statistics have led to considerable uncertainty in China's ability to achieve its carbon mitigation targets. Here, we quantitatively measure the impact of energy data revisions on China's ability to achieve its mitigation targets. Our results indicate the following effects of data revisions: 1. Mitigation challenges...
Chapter
Global urbanization promises better services, stronger economies, and more connections; it also carries risks and unforeseeable consequences. To deepen our understanding of this complex process and its importance for global sustainability, we need to build interdisciplinary knowledge around a systems approach. Urban Planet takes an integrative look...
Chapter
Full-text available
Global urbanization promises better services, stronger economies, and more connections; it also carries risks and unforeseeable consequences. To deepen our understanding of this complex process and its importance for global sustainability, we need to build interdisciplinary knowledge around a systems approach. Urban Planet takes an integrative look...
Article
Full-text available
This article introduces the special issue “REDD+ crossroads post Paris: politics, lessons and interplays”. The contributions to the special issue demonstrate, first, that REDD+ design in the studied countries has generally lacked social legitimacy and sidelined key actors that have an important role in shaping land-use sector dynamics. Second, they...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we outline the multifaceted roles played by non‐state actors within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and place this within the wider landscape of global climate governance. In doing so, we look at both the formation and aftermath of the 2015 Paris Agreement. We argue that the Paris Agreement cements an arch...
Article
Full-text available
This paper addresses the question of legitimacy in REDD+ governance in Indonesia. It develops a legitimacy framework that builds on elements of Scharpf (J Eur Pub Policy 4(1):18–36, 1997) input and output legitimacy concept and the political economy lens described by Brockhaus and Angelsen (Analysing REDD+: Challenges and choices, CIFOR, Bogor, 201...
Article
China is the world's largest energy consumer and CO2 emitter. Cities contribute 85% of the total CO2 emissions in China and thus are considered as the key areas for implementing policies designed for climate change adaption and CO2 emission mitigation. However, the emission inventory construction of Chinese cities has not been well researched, main...
Article
Full-text available
Because of its low level of energy consumption and the small scale of its industrial development, the Tibet Autonomous Region has historically been excluded from China’s reported energy statistics, including those regarding CO2 emissions. In this paper, we estimate Tibet’s energy consumption using limited online documents, and we calculate the 2014...
Article
Full-text available
China is the world's largest energy consumer and CO2 emitter. Cities contribute 85% of the total CO2 emissions in China and thus are considered as the key areas for implementing policies designed for climate change adaption and CO2 emission mitigation. However, the emission inventory construction of Chinese cities has not been well researched, main...
Research
Full-text available
To reduce deforestation and degradation, REDD+ projects need to be equitable in both procedures and outcomes. REDD+ brings risks and opportunities for rural Ugandans and successful projects must gain and maintain the trust and support of diverse local communities and avoid imposing costs upon them. There is scant evidence from REDD+ pilot projects...
Article
Full-text available
How are nonstate actors within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) held to account? In this article, we introduce the concept of “institutional accountability” to complement the wider literature(s) on accountability in climate governance. Within institutional frameworks, actors employ rules, norms, and procedures to d...
Article
The alluring yet nebulous concept of transformative change is increasingly gaining traction in conversations about pathways to more sustainable futures. As such, new conceptual tools are needed to illuminate variety of actors, interests, and capacities at play in potentially radical experiments. This paper draws upon multi-level governance theory,...
Article
In an Editorial now published in “Global Environmental Change”, 18 climate policy researchers argue that analyses of equity and justice are absolutely essential for our ability to understand climate politics and contribute to concrete efforts to achieve adequate, fair and enduring climate action for present and future generations. Climate change ac...
Article
Particulate air pollution has had a significant impact on human health in China and it is associated with cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and high mortality and morbidity. These health impacts could be translated to reduced labor availability and time. This paper utilized a supply-driven input-output (I-O) model to estimate the monetary val...
Article
Full-text available
China is the world's largest energy consumer and CO2 emitter. Cities contribute 85 % of the total CO2 emissions in China and thus are considered the key areas for implementing policies designed for climate change adaption and CO2 emission mitigation. However, understanding the CO2 emission status of Chinese cities remains a challenge, mainly owing...
Book
Drawing upon a variety of empirical and theoretical perspectives, The Urban Climate Challengeprovides a hands-on perspective about the political and technical challenges now facing cities and transnational urban networks in the global climate regime. Bringing together experts working in the fields of global environmental governance, urban sustainab...
Chapter
Full-text available
Land use is being fundamentally transformed worldwide. G overnance mechanisms that manage land use are changing from territorial organizations to global institutions anchored to specific resource flows between urban and rural areas. This shift reflects an underlying change of v alues attached to land, from the creation of new monetary values to the...
Article
Full-text available
Since the mid-1990s, the aim of keeping climate change within 2 degrees C has become firmly entrenched in policy discourses. In the past few years, the likelihood of achieving it has been increasingly called into question. The debate around what to do with a target that seems less and less achievable is, however, only just beginning. As the UN comm...
Article
Full-text available
While some jurisdictions are demonstrating leadership on climate change, it is clear that sufficient mitigation of climate change is not occurring. This highlights the importance of innovative approaches that bolster politically fraught international treaties and voluntary networks with strategies that exploit the strengths of a variety of traditio...
Article
Full-text available
The papers in this theme issue seek to advance our understanding of the roles of networks and partnerships in the multilevel governance of climate change and related issues in the urban context. In particular, the papers examine the roles of nontraditional actors and apply emerging theoretical approaches such as sustainability transitions theory to...
Article
This article reviews recent research on contemporary transformations of global land governance. It shows how changes in global governance have facilitated and responded to radical revalorizations of land, together driving the intensified competition and struggles over land observed in many other contributions to this special issue. The rules in pla...
Article
Full-text available
Since the mid-1990s, the aim of keeping climate change within 2 8C has become firmly entrenched in policy discourses. In the past few years, the likelihood of achieving it has been increasingly called into question. The debate around what to do with a target that seems less and less achievable is, however, only just beginning. As the UN commences a...
Article
Full-text available
This article challenges the assumption that the boundaries of state versus non-state and public versus private can readily be drawn. It argues that the roles of actors — as state or non-state — and the forms of authority — public or private — are not pre-given but are forged through the process of governing. Drawing on neo-Gramscian and governmenta...
Article
Full-text available
This review critically assesses a large and growing literature on multi-actor environmental governance. The first section provides an histor-ical and conceptual background to the observed increase in such ar-rangements. The second section describes the diversity of governance arrangements and the related actor constellations to address environ-ment...
Article
Full-text available
Current United Nations structures are highly inequitable and obstruct progress towards international climate policy co-operation.
Article
Full-text available
The United Nations conference in Rio de Janeiro in June is an important opportunity to improve the institutional framework for sustainable development.
Article
Full-text available
The current institutional framework for sustainable development is by far not strong enough to bring about the swift transformative progress that is needed. This article contends that incrementalism—the main approach since the 1972 Stockholm Conference—will not suffice to bring about societal change at the level and speed needed to mitigate and ada...
Article
Full-text available
Sustainability has many dimensions, including various aspects of environmental, social and economic sustainability. This paper proposes an analytical framework of risk-related governance for sustainability, based on literature review, focusing on two dimensions—knowledge integration and multi-actor governance. Knowledge integration necessitates wid...
Article
Full-text available
United Nations climate change conferences have attracted an increasing number and range of observer participants, often outnumbering national delegates. The interactions between the formal and informal spaces of climate governance at the Conference of the Parties (COP) are explored by investigating why non-nation state actors (NNSAs) attend them an...
Article
Science assessments indicate that human activities are moving several of Earth's sub-systems outside the range of natural variability typical for the previous 500,000 years (1, 2). Human societies must now change course and steer away from critical tipping points in the Earth system that might lead to rapid and irreversible change (3). This require...
Article
This paper investigates the role of forest tenure in creating a sustainable and effective mechanism on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+). It draws together existing knowledge and experience of forest tenure issues as they play out in real contexts, and evaluates their implications for REDD+. In particular, it chal...
Article
Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, conserving and enhancing forest carbon stocks, and sustainably managing forests (REDD+) are emerging as a central policy instrument to halt land-use related emissions from developing countries. In this article we introduce a special issue dedicated to understanding the governance and imp...
Article
Full-text available
[ Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 369, 6–19 (13 January 2011) (doi:10.1098/rsta.2010.0303)][1] The name of the third author should be ‘Heike Schroeder’. The corrected author list is therefore: By Mark New, Diana Liverman, Heike Schroeder and Kevin Anderson [1]: /lookup/doi/10.1098/rsta.2010.0303
Article
Full-text available
The 1992 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change commits signatories to preventing 'dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system', leaving unspecified the level of global warming that is dangerous. In the late 1990s, a limit of 2°C global warming above preindustrial temperature was proposed as a 'guard rail' below which most of th...
Article
Full-text available
The Earth System Science Partnership, which unites all major global change research programmes, declared in 2001 an urgent need to develop “strategies for Earth System management”. Yet what such strategies might be, how they could be developed, and how effective, efficient and equitable such strategies would be, remains unspecified. It is apparent...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the agency of indigenous peoples in designing a mechanism for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) under the emerging post-2012 agreement to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. It investigates whether indigenous peoples have agency in international negotiations and specific...
Article
This study examines how corporate governance of climate change is developing in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong), Asia's leading financial centre. It situates corporate actions within the broader framework of urban multi-stakeholder climate governance. In the absence of international obligations under the Kyoto Protocol and g...
Article
In 2001, the Earth System Science Partnership declared an urgent need to develop 'strategies for Earth System management'. Yet what such strategies might be, how they could be developed and how effective, efficient and equitable such strategies would be, remain unspecified. We argue that the institutions, organizations and mechanisms by which human...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge about urban governance and planning for climate change. In undertaking this comparative review, the report provides a synopsis of the issues that are facing cities with respect to climate change mitigation and adaptation, in the north and in the south. While both roo...
Article
Full-text available
The governance of climate change has traditionally been conceived as an issue of international co-operation and considered through the lens of regime analysis. Increasingly, scholars of global governance have highlighted the multiple parallel initiatives involving a range of actors at different levels of governance through which this issue is being...
Article
This article was submitted without an abstract, please refer to the full-text PDF file.
Article
Full-text available
This Article examines how global cities are governing climate change. Part I of this Article provides an overview of the national and international contexts of urban climate governance focusing on the United Kingdom and the United States. Parts II and III analyze London and Los Angeles, respectively, as examples of global cities. They provide a tho...
Chapter
This chapter explores the policy relevance of the Institutional Dimensions of Global Environmental Change (IDGEC) research project findings in enhancing the ability of policy makers to weigh multiple choices to address large-scale environmental issues. It begins with a brief note on the nature of the science–policy interface and continues to discus...
Article
Full-text available
"Since the development of the Institutional Dimensions of Global Environmental Change (IDGEC) Science Plan in 1998 has become an important subject of inquiry. The Science Plan put institutional interaction on the agenda of global change research when only a handful of scholars had raised the general issue. Their work drew attention to the risk of '...
Article
Full-text available
Studies have shown that institutions play a crucial role both in causing and in addressing problems arising from human–environment interactions. But the nature of this role is complex and not easily described. This book presents an overview of the findings of long, painstaking scientific research on how institutions matter in efforts to tackle such...
Chapter
This chapter applies the concepts of vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation to two case studies of natural disasters, the Asian Tsunami in Thailand and Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. In seeking to unveil opportunities for institutional learning to better cope with similar hazards in the future, the chapter explores the emergency response mech...
Article
Full-text available
The challenge confronting those seeking to understand the institutional dimensions of global environmental change and patterns of land-use and land-cover change is to find effective methods for analyzing the dynamics of socio-ecological systems. Such systems exhibit a number of characteristics that pose problems for the most commonly used statistic...
Article
Chemical air pollution in Europe has been tackled by multiple institutions, in particular the Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution to Improve Air Quality (CLRTAP) and European Union air pollution policy. The two regimes differ in terms of membership and policymaking capacity which has, over the decades, resulted in significant inter...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This paper has shown that the role of science is significant in the lead up to the negotiations, but is replaced by political and economic considerations once the negotiations begin. At this stage, the focus is more on technical issues (e.g. how would an emissions trading scheme impact on emission reduction limits?) rather than scientific. Referrin...
Article
United Nations (UN) climate change conferences have attracted a rapidly increasing number and range of observer participants, oftentimes outnumbering national delegates. Can this phenomenon be dismissed as the 'climate change circus' or 'climate change tourism' or are new agents and actors emerging? If so, are they influencing the decisions made in...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (6)
Project
This project seeks to explore how indigenous knowledge can inform more just, inclusive and sustainable development. We engage indigenous communities in 3 developing countries – in Lomerio in eastern Bolivia, Karamoja in northeast Uganda and Ok Tedi in western Papua New Guinea - to explore how a strengthened local engagement can provide platforms for indigenous ancestral and place-based knowledge to respond to social and environmental challenges and to overcome political asymmetries. In each country we draw on partnerships with civil society organisations and academics boasting extensive grassroots experience and connections, broad national and international policy networks and a proven track-record for policy engagement. Funding has been provided by the UK Global Challenges Research Fund-ESRC under their call 'New Models of Sustainable Development: Transitions towards sustainable and inclusive societies' Our approach comprises 3 concurrent, interrelated streams: 1) Action research supporting the expression of indigenous knowledge, its contribution to social and ecological outcomes, and visions for the future. A range of co-designed research methods and media may be utilised within partnering communities, not only by academics but, by Indigenous, community researchers. Methods may include storytelling, life history interviews, mapping exercises, landscape walks, focus groups, participatory video, visioning/ scenario-building exercises and digitial storymapping. 2) Local, regional and national policy events: