Heidi K Meyer

Heidi K Meyer
Institute of Marine Research in Norway | IMR

PhD

About

7
Publications
1,548
Reads
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115
Citations
Citations since 2016
7 Research Items
115 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Education
May 2018 - May 2022
University of Bergen
Field of study
September 2016 - September 2017
Bangor University
Field of study
  • Marine Biology
September 2012 - March 2016
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Marine Biology

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Mass occurrences of large sponges, or ‘sponge grounds’, are found globally in a range of oceanographic settings. Interest in these grounds is growing because of their ecological importance as hotspots of biodiversity, their role in biogeochemical cycling and bentho-pelagic coupling, the biotechnological potential of their constituent sponges, and t...
Article
Full-text available
Deep-sea sponge grounds are important habitats that provide several ecosystem services, yet relatively little is known about their distribution and ecology. While most surveys have focused on the broad-scale distribution patterns of sponge grounds (100s–1000s m), only rarely have the finer-scale (<10 m) spatial distribution patterns of the primary...
Article
Full-text available
The Sognefjord is the longest (205 km) and deepest (1308 m) fjord in Norway, and the second-longest in the world. Coast-fjord exchange in Sognefjord is limited by a seaward sill at 170 m water depth, which causes a clear stratification between water masses as the dense oxygen-poor basin water mixes slowly with the well-oxygenated water directly abo...
Article
Full-text available
Water masses are bodies of water with distinctive physical and biogeochemical properties. They impart vertical structure to the deep ocean, participate in circulation, and can be traced over great distances, potentially influencing the distributions of deep-sea fauna. The classic potential temperature-salinity ( θ - s ) diagram was used to investig...
Article
Full-text available
Our understanding of the benthic communities on arctic seamounts and descriptions of such communities in habitat classification systems are limited. In recent years, Schulz Bank (73°52′N 7°30′E), a seamount on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR), has become well studied but the work has primarily focused on an arctic sponge ground at the summit. This...
Article
Full-text available
Few studies have described the effects of physical disturbance and post-recovery of deep-sea benthic communities. Here, we explore the status of deep-sea sponge ground communities four years after being impacted by an experimental bottom trawl. The diversity and abundance of epibenthic megafauna of two distinct benthic communities in disturbed vers...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
SponGES is a research and innovation project funded under the H2020 Blue Growth BG1 call aimed at “Improving the preservation and sustainable exploitation of Atlantic marine ecosystems”. Its overarching goal is to develop an integrated ecosystem-based approach to preserve and sustainably use deep-sea sponge ecosystems of the North Atlantic. Its consortium, an international and interdisciplinary collaboration of 19 European and North American research institutions, environmental non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations, will focus on one of the most diverse, ecologically and biologically important and vulnerable marine ecosystems of the deep-sea - sponge grounds – that have received very little research and conservation attention to date. Over the course of four years, from March 2016 - Feb 2020, SponGES will: 1 - Strengthen the knowledge-base on North Atlantic sponge ground ecosystems by investigating their distribution, diversity, biogeography, function and dynamics; 2 - Improve innovation and industrial application by unlocking the biotechnological potential of these ecosystems; 3 - Improve the capacity to model, understand and predict threats and impacts and future anthropogenic and climate-driven changes to these ecosystems; 4 - Advance the science-policy interface and developing tools for improved resource management and good governance of these ecosystems from regional to international levels across the North Atlantic. Want to know more? Follow us on: www.deepseasponges.org https://www.facebook.com/Deep-Sea-Sponges-1101396993244491/ https://twitter.com/DeepSea_Sponges *SponGES has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 679849