Heidi Acampora

Heidi Acampora
Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology | GMIT · Department of Natural Science

PhD in Aquatic Science

About

11
Publications
3,677
Reads
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224
Citations
Introduction
Heidi does research in Seabird Ecology, Marine Biology and Zoology. Their most recent publication is 'Contrasting congener profiles for persistent organic pollutants and PAH monitoring in European storm petrels (Hydrobates pelagicus) breeding in Ireland: a preen oil versus feathers approach.' Her research interests involve seabird and sea turtle ecology and marine pollution such as plastics and persistent organic pollutants.
Additional affiliations
February 2012 - June 2012
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Master's Student
September 2011 - December 2011
University of Oviedo
Position
  • Master's Student
September 2010 - August 2011
Ghent University
Position
  • Master's Student

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are anthropogenic contaminants of environmental concern due to their persistence in the environment and capacity to accumulate in biota. Many of these contaminants have been found to have ill effects over wildlife and humans. Birds are known to be particularly affected...
Article
Seabirds can interact with marine litter, mainly by entanglement or ingestion. The ingestion of plastics can lead to starvation or physical damage to the digestive tract. For chicks, it could additionally lead to reduced growth, affecting survival and fledging. This study quantified the ingestion of plastics by seabird chicks via an opportunistic s...
Article
Full-text available
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are chemical compounds of environmental concern due to their toxic, persistent nature and their ability to bio-accumulate in biological tissue. Seabirds, for often being at the top of the food web, have been used as monitors of environmental pollutants. Adverse effects caused by POPs have been reported in common...
Article
Plastic pollution has been the subject of much research in the last decade. Seabirds can mistake plastic fragments for prey, which can perforate or block the digestive tract and cause ulcers. Most commonly, seabirds accumulate this indigestible matter in their stomachs, obtaining no nutrition and may die from starvation. Certain species of seabirds...
Article
Marine plastic litter has become a major threat to wildlife. Marine animals are highly susceptible to entanglement and ingestion of debris at sea. Governments all around the world are being urged to monitor litter sources and inputs, and to mitigate the impacts of marine litter, which is primarily composed of plastics. European policies, such as Os...
Article
Full-text available
In the days preceding 22 June 2020, the weather along the south coast of Ireland featured strong southerly winds with mild temperatures. It was unseasonably wet and heavy rain persisted throughout the morning of 22 June. Arlo Jacques was walking on the beach at Tramore, Waterford, Ireland, at low tide, just after midday, when he noticed a distresse...