Heide Castañeda

Heide Castañeda
University of South Florida | USF · Department of Anthropology

PhD, MPH

About

67
Publications
11,699
Reads
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2,339
Citations
Introduction
Heide Castañeda is a Professor of Anthropology at the University of South Florida. Her research areas include political and legal anthropology, law and society, medical anthropology, borders, migration, migrant health, citizenship, policing, focusing on the U.S./Mexico border, United States, Mexico, Germany, and Morocco. She is the author of Borders of Belonging: Struggle and Solidarity in Mixed-Status Immigrant Families (Stanford University Press, 2019).
Additional affiliations
August 2007 - present
University of South Florida
Position
  • Associate Professor and Graduate Director

Publications

Publications (67)
Article
Full-text available
This article brings the social science concept of ‘deservingness’ to bear on clinical cases of transnational migrant patients. Based on the authors’ medical social science research, health delivery practice and clinical work from multiple locations in Africa. Europe and the Americas, the article describes three clinical cases in which assumptions o...
Article
Mental and emotional well-being are intimately entangled with immigration status, personal relationships, and the broader political environment. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in South Texas including interviews with mixed-status families, this article illustrates the spillover impacts affecting mental and emotional health of family members with...
Article
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Rural populations in the United States are faced with a variety of health disparities that complicate access to care. Community health workers (CHWs) and their Spanish-speaking counterparts, promotores de salud, are well-equipped to address rural health access issues, provide education, and ultimately assuage these disparities. In this article, we...
Article
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Culture of Health Action Framework aims to "make health a shared value" and improve population health equity through widespread culture change. The authors draw upon their expertise as anthropologists to identify 3 challenges that they believe must be addressed in order to effectively achieve the health equity a...
Chapter
In recent years, immigration enforcement policies have exacerbated Latinx immigrants’ health-related vulnerabilities and threatened the health and well-being of entire communities, including US-born citizen children in mixed-status families. Accordingly, the relationship between health, immigration status, and immigration enforcement has become an...
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Structural vulnerability illuminates how social positionings shape outcomes for marginalized individuals, like migrant farmworkers, who are often Latino, indigenous, and/or undocumented. Furthering scholarship on negotiating constraints, we explore how school employees (here, Migrant Advocates) broker health care access for migrant farmworker famil...
Book
Borders of Belonging investigates a pressing but previously unexplored aspect of immigration in America—the impact of immigration policies and practices not only on undocumented migrants, but also on their family members, some of whom possess a form of legal status. Heide Castañeda reveals the trauma, distress, and inequalities that occur daily, al...
Book
The Affordable Care Act’s impact on coverage, access to care, and systematic exclusion in our health care system The Affordable Care Act set off an unprecedented wave of health insurance enrollment as the most sweeping overhaul of the U.S. health insurance system since 1965. In the years since its enactment, some 20 million uninsured Americans ga...
Article
The containment of immigrants along the US/Mexico border illuminates the complex spatial implications associated with the securitization of migration enforcement. The production of marginalized, carceral national spaces has particular consequences for the people that inhabit them, as processes of spatial illegality shape their daily lives. Our anal...
Article
The “DACAmented Voices in Healthcare” project examined the intersection of restrictive immigration policies and health care via photovoice, a participatory action research approach, with immigrant youth living in Arizona, who were recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. These “DACAmented” youth took part in nine pho...
Chapter
Jessica M. Mulligan and Heide Castañeda’s conclusion evaluates why the ACA remained so controversial years after its passage and presents four lessons learned from the ethnographic studies collected in the book. The authors conclude that people in the United States want and need affordable health insurance coverage. However, stratified approaches t...
Article
In this paper, we consider how news stories about one area of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas, further propagate notions of a region filled with people characterized as dangerously noncompliant with American ideals of citizenship, prosperity, and security. Using Ethnographic Content Analysis, we conducted a systema...
Article
What has been the fate of those living in the place once dubbed the ‘county that needs the Affordable Care Act the most’? This article presents results from a longitudinal, five-year ethnographic study of healthcare access in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. It explores reasons why this region along the U.S./Mexico border has the highest rate of uni...
Article
The European refugee crisis has gained worldwide attention with daily media coverage both in and outside Germany. Representations of refugees in media and political discourse in relation to Germany participate in a Gramscian “war of position” over symbols, policies, and, ultimately, social and material resources, with potentially fatal consequences...
Article
Full-text available
http://anthrosource.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/hub/issue/10.1002/%28ISSN%291548-1425%28CAT%29VirtualIssues%28VI%29Refugeesandimmigrants/
Article
Although immigration and immigrant populations have become increasingly important foci in public health research and practice, a social determinants of health approach has seldom been applied in this area. Global patterns of morbidity and mortality follow inequities rooted in societal, political, and economic conditions produced and reproduced by s...
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In this paper we report on findings from the first known study using qualitative methods to explore factors influencing physicians’ participation in an ongoing federally-funded prostate cancer chemoprevention clinical trial. We sought to identify ways to improve collaboration between researchers and physicians and enhance the success of future proj...
Conference Paper
Background: A great deal of public health scholarship explores family and intimate partner violence through models of control and power, behavioral cycles, and ecological determinants. However, additional efforts to address violence must explore how family and intimate partner violence may be embedded within broader social systems, including immigr...
Article
There are approximately 2.3 million mixed-status families in the United States, containing varied combinations of citizens, permanent legal residents, undocumented immigrants, and individuals in legal limbo. These families offer an opportunity to examine the functioning of the contemporary state and its penetration at the household level. For many...
Article
Contemporary debates on health and immigration reform often display a lack of understanding of how limited health care access can aggravate problems and contribute to major disparities. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010, designed to ensure broader health insurance coverage for populations across the United States, is likely to actually reduce a...
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Abstract This study examined disaster preparedness and decision-making by caregivers of community-dwelling persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's or a related dementia (ADRD). Interviews were conducted with 20 caregivers in South Florida. Twelve of these interviews include caregiving experiences during the highly active 2004-2005 hurricane seasons. Res...
Article
This article discusses the discursive framing of displacement and legitimacy for Roma migrants living in Germany to explore distinctions between “economic” and “forced” migration. Despite efforts towards their inclusion at the EU level, there has been an escalation in anti-Roma sentiment across Europe simultaneous with increased transnational mobil...
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This article explores how dyads of 186 community-dwelling individuals with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease or a related disorder (ADRD) and their caregivers (dyads) plan to respond to hurricane evacuation warnings in South Florida. Predictors of dyad evacuation for a category 1-3 storm include (1) a younger age of the person with an ADRD diagnos...
Article
It is well established that the general public has varying interpretations of the term "risk" and the qualifiers associated with it, such as low, moderate, or high. What is less well known is how definition and application of this term impacts recruitment of individuals, particularly for biomedical and behavioral research designed to improve knowle...
Article
This article examines organized efforts by citizens to provide medical aid to unauthorized migrants in Germany. A case study of an activist organization in Berlin highlights how prevailing forms of governance through citizenship are disrupted. Three major themes are explored. First, historical contingencies and policy realities explain why, given e...
Article
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Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Limited knowledge exists pertaining to advance care planning (ACP) among Colombian, Mexican, and Puerto Rican women with a cancer diagnosis living in Central Florida, in the USA. The purpose of the study is to identify factors that facilitated the completion of ACP and decisions making patterns among the three groups of Latinas. Methods:...
Conference Paper
Unauthorized immigration remains a contentious topic worldwide, and measures to constrain unauthorized immigrants' access to health care have emerged through various legislative processes. This presentation discusses the legal constraints in accessing health services for unauthorized immigrants in Berlin, Germany, and Atlanta, Georgia, USA. In Germ...
Article
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Farmworkers in the US are a medically underserved group, who are largely uninsured, foreign-born, and working in a hazardous industry. This review addresses the challenges of providing health services for this priority population to study the numerous health access barriers that face migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFW), evaluates the services p...
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Patients receiving complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies often report shifts in well-being that go beyond resolution of the original presenting symptoms. We undertook a research program to develop and evaluate a patient-centered outcome measure to assess the multidimensional impacts of CAM therapies, utilizing a novel mixed methods...
Article
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Oral health care is critical for farmworkers' families in Central Florida. There is little research regarding the access to primary oral health care, barriers, and behaviors of Mexican migrant families. Forty semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents who are farmworkers in order to understand the factors that impact dental service util...
Article
This article examines the unintended effects of policy on the cross-border health care experiences of persons from the new Central and Eastern European (CEE) states of the European Union (EU) during a time of major transition. While permitted to travel freely, most individuals from the new member states are not yet authorised to work in Germany. As...
Article
Interventions tailored to individual smoker characteristics have increasingly received attention in the tobacco control literature. The majority of tailored interventions are generated by computers and administered with printed materials or web-based programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the tailoring activities of community lay health...
Article
In March of 2010, President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (known together as the Affordable Care Act or ACA). The largest legislative overhaul of the US health care system since the expansion of the Social Security Act in the 1960s, it invoked a fierce natio...
Article
Of the estimated 214 million people who have migrated from poorer to richer countries in search of a better life, between 20 and 30 million have migrated on an unauthorized, or "illegal," basis. All have health needs, or will in the future, yet most are denied health care available to citizens and authorized residents. To many, unauthorized im/migr...
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The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers and benefits to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in a low-income, Latina farmworker population in central Florida. This study reports on formative qualitative research conducted on perceptions of benefits, barriers, costs, place, and promotion related to the HPV vaccine from surveys and i...
Article
Persons of migrant background, a highly heterogeneous group, now comprise one-fifth of the total population in Germany. However, delayed and conflicted responses to social inclusion have resulted in clear deficits in the health care system, with few serious attempts to assess migrants' profiles and needs. This article provides a critical review bas...
Article
Universal notions of a "right to health" for unauthorized migrants operate together with incongruous state and international policies. These ambivalent policies demand ethnographic attention, since they have resulted in a two-tiered system in host countries and foster short-term, improvisational remedies. Medical care for unauthorized migrants is t...
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The Surgeon General's report, "Culture, Race, and Ethnicity: A Supplement to Mental Health," points to the need for subgroup specific mental health research that explores the cultural variation and heterogeneity of the Latino population. Guided by cognitive anthropological theories of culture, we utilized ethnographic interviewing techniques to exp...
Article
This article provides an overview of some of the major topical areas in the study of im/migrant health relevant for applied and practicing anthropologists. It illustrates the conceptual, methodological, and theoretical insights they have contributed to the discipline as a whole. Topics include the intersection of health care and immigration policy;...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background: Lay health advisors may play an important role in community-based tobacco cessation by providing advice and information about resources and support networks. Little is known about their experiences conducting brief cessation interventions in diverse, real world settings. Objective: To examine the intervention activities of community mem...
Article
Latinas have higher cervical cancer age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates, and present with more advanced disease compared to non-Latino whites. This study used a cross-sectional mixed methods survey design, exploring knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV), the HPV vaccine, and cervical cancer screening with...
Article
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To identify types of health influencers in tobacco cessation based on the frequency and characteristics of brief intervention activities. Longitudinal qualitative interviews were completed with 28 individuals posttraining. Four individuals were categorized as Rarely Active, 5 as Active With Family and Friends, 9 as Active in the Workplace, and 10 a...
Article
Few studies have engaged issues of social class and access related to dental health care policy from an ethnographic perspective. The state of Florida in the US has one of the poorest records in the nation for providing dental care for low-income children, falling especially short for Medicaid-enrolled children. In this paper, we discuss unmet dent...
Article
Backstretch workers are part of an itinerant labor community that cares for horses at racetracks across the U.S. Since the 1970s, this workforce has increasingly been composed of migrants, especially from Mexico and Guatemala. No studies have focused systematic attention on health concerns of this population and how illness is influenced by unique...
Article
Unauthorized migrants face health disadvantages in many receiving nations. However, few studies have explored precisely how the condition of "illegality" influences illness experiences, medical treatment, and convalescence. This article presents a case study from Germany (2004-2006 and 2008), where unauthorized migrants face limited access to healt...
Article
Women's experiences of migration, and their relationship to a host country, vary significantly from those of migrant men simply because pregnancy is a possibility. The concept of "demographic theft" highlights popular anxieties regarding high fertility among foreigners, including undocumented migrants. This article examines pregnant undocumented wo...
Article
Women's experiences of migration, and their relationship to a host country, vary significantly from those of migrant men simply because pregnancy is a possibility. The concept of “demographic theft” highlights popular anxieties regarding high fertility among foreigners, including undocumented migrants. This article examines pregnant undocumented wo...
Article
Full-text available
The authors present findings from a community-based tobacco cessation project that trained lay health influencers to conduct brief interventions. They outline four major lessons regarding sustainability. First, participants were concerned about the impact that promoting cessation might have on social relationships. "Social risk" must be addressed d...
Article
Risk modeling is an increasingly important part of clinical medicine; however, "risk status" is a complex notion, understood differently by patients and clinicians. Patients' ability to make informed choices about clinical procedures often requires that they interpret risk statistics, which may be difficult to understand and apply. In this article,...
Article
With the increasing technical sophistication of medicine, clinicians' task of assuring patient informed consent is increasingly elusive. Taking the example of prenatal genetic testing, we examine efforts to communicate the complexities of genetic knowledge and risk calculation to patients. In this qualitative, descriptive study, we interviewed 50 c...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This research study is an exploratory and descriptive study of the relationships between national and international laws, state and local institutions, and community-level practices surrounding transit migration (the migration of Central Americans) through the Pacific route of Mexico. The project aims to understand the ways that Mexican state alaws, policies, and institutional practices are determined by international, national, and local politics and discourses about migrants in-transit, including how these persons are viewed as deserving or not deserving of state support. In addition, we examine practices of non-governmental organizations and other, informal, humanitarian efforts, which seek to provide support (shelter, food, medical care) to migrants in transit, and the obstacles and facilitators of such local forms of aid. This project contributes to contemporary anthropological theorizing about migration as well as to international and national responses to transit migration.
Project
The Immigrant Youth Project is a collaborative research study supported by the National Science Foundation and conducted by researchers at the University of South Florida and the Cisneros Hispanic Leadership Institute at the George Washington University. We are collecting stories about the experiences of immigrant young adults living in Florida to understand their social and emotional well-being. We hope to share the insights of our findings with policymakers, advocates, teachers, counselors, and community members to address the experiences of immigrant youth. The research team cares about the significance of our work among immigrant communities across the United States and we have partnered with several organizations who directly engage with these populations such as United We Dream and the Florida Immigrant Coalition.
Project
National Science Foundation Award Abstract #1535664 Mixed-Status Families and Citizenship in the Contemporary Migration Experience Investigator(s): Heide Castaneda hcastaneda@usf.edu NSF Program(s): SOCIOLOGY, LAW AND SOCIAL SCIENCES, CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY There are 2.3 million mixed-status families in the US, in which the uncertain legal status of some members influences opportunities and resources for all, including permanent residents and US citizens. A focus on individuals in US law and policy largely overlooks cumulative ripple effects on families, although individuals are always embedded within these complex social units. This study examines how mixed-status families experience specific policies related to health care and education, and seeks to understand how they collectively navigate opportunities and obstacles. It is necessary to understand the experiences of these families -- including and especially the impacts on some 4.5 million US citizen children -- in order to ensure equitable application of policy and to reduce disparities. Using mixed-status families as a primary unit of analysis, this project advances scholarship on how juridical categories shape socialization to identities within the domestic sphere as well as in relation to public institutions such as health care and education. This ethnographic study examines how families actively negotiate institutions by employing a longitudinal, three-year design. Data from multiple members of 40 mixed-status families will be examined across two points in time. This will be contextualized through participant observation and interviews with 50 service providers and community experts. This study seeks to transform theories of migration and law by shifting the focus from individuals to families, better revealing social impacts and how difference are shaped at the family level. Bridging experiences at the micro-familial with those at the policy level will result in advances for understanding the contemporary migration experience and theoretical concerns in the social science of law.