Heather Hamill

Heather Hamill
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Sociology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

24
Publications
10,254
Reads
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343
Citations
Citations since 2017
13 Research Items
160 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030
20172018201920202021202220230102030
20172018201920202021202220230102030
Additional affiliations
September 2006 - present
University of Oxford
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
The governance of pharmaceutical medicines entails complex ethical decisions that should, in theory, be the responsibility of democratically accountable government agencies. However, in many Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs), regulatory and health systems constraints mean that many people still lack access to safe, appropriate and affordable...
Article
In this paper, we argue that understanding and addressing the problem of poor-quality medical products requires a more interdisciplinary approach than has been evident to date. While prospective studies based on rigorous standardized methodologies are the gold standard for measuring the prevalence of poor-quality medical products and understanding...
Article
Full-text available
In 2012, the WHO launched its Global Surveillance and Monitoring System (GSMS) for substandard and falsified medicines, with the aim of improving the quality of reporting and using the data to inform post-market surveillance and build regulatory capacity. However, from a regulatory governance perspective, its effectiveness depends on the willingnes...
Article
Full-text available
Where regulation is weak, medicine transactions can be characterised by uncertainty over the drug quality and efficacy, with buyers shouldering the greater burden of risk in exchanges that are typically asymmetric. Drawing on in-depth interviews (N = 220) and observations of medicine transactions, plus interviews with regulators (N = 20), we explor...
Article
Full-text available
We present an Agent-Based Model (hereafter ABM) for a pharmaceutical supply chain operating under conditions of weak regulation and imperfect information, exploring the possibility of poor quality medicines and their detection. Our interest is to demonstrate how buyers can learn about the quality of sellers (and their medicines) based on previous s...
Chapter
This chapter turns to the Protestant community and examines paramilitary punishment attacks (PPAs) perpetrated by Loyalist paramilitaries. Although the violent methods used by Republican and Loyalist armed groups are similar, their motivation is somewhat different. In particular, the supply of PPAs carried out by Loyalist paramilitaries outweighs t...
Chapter
This chapter attempts to get to the heart of the matter and asks why the punishment administered by the paramilitaries and/or the state does not deter these young people from further recidivism. This lack of a specific deterrent effect violates the rational norm on which deterrence is founded, that certainty and severity of punishment will prevent...
Chapter
This concluding chapter comments on the changing political scene in Northern Ireland and reflects on the effect that these changes will have on the roles and functions of the various Republican and Loyalist paramilitary groups. As the number of PPAs diminishes, and the phenomenon perhaps ceases altogether, the chapter considers what effect this wil...
Chapter
This chapter attempts to understand the behavior of the hoods by examining their specific offense patterns. It provides evidence that the hoods operate in a subculture of delinquency described as a way of life that has somehow become traditional. Sociologists studying offending among young people have provided two basic insights about juvenile deli...
Chapter
This chapter argues that, from the early days of the political conflict in the 1970s the conditions were such that the Irish Republican Army (IRA) adopted some of the functions of the state, namely the provision of policing and punishment of ordinary crime. The hostility of the statutory criminal justice system, particularly the police, toward the...
Chapter
This chapter explains the dominant features of working-class culture. In particular, the ways in which status and prestige can be gained among the adult male population, and the fact that the hoods are excluded from these paths to power, are explored. This chapter also examines the relationships between the hoods and the influence of their friends...
Article
Full-text available
In contexts where healthcare regulation is weak and levels of uncertainty high, how do patients decide whom and what to trust? In this paper, we explore the potential for using Signalling Theory (ST, a form of Behavioural Game Theory) to investigate health-related trust problems under conditions of uncertainty, using the empirical example of ‘herba...
Article
An affirmative action programme, established by the Fair Employment (Northern Ireland) Act 1989, has been an important attempt to ensure ‘fair participation’ in employment for both Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland since 1990. The programme includes detailed monitoring of the community background of employees and requires employers to u...
Book
Full-text available
A distinctive feature of the conflict in Northern Ireland over the past forty years has been the way Catholic and Protestant paramilitaries have policed their own communities. This has mainly involved the violent punishment of petty criminals involved in joyriding and other types of antisocial behavior. Between 1973 and 2007, more than 5,000 nonmil...
Article
Full-text available
New research has shown that Northern Ireland's innovative affirmative action programme has resulted in improvements in fair employment, both for Catholics and Protestants. In this article, we provide a non-technical account of this research and some preliminary "headline" results, together with a brief analysis of some policy implications. More det...
Article
Driving a taxi is dangerous, and picking up the wrong fare can be devastating. Yet drivers only have a moment to make a choice.
Article
Full-text available
This paper raises two difficulties with an earlier contribution to this Journal (Coles 2001) and proposes solutions. While we strongly support his suggestion that neglect of Social Network Analysis (SNA) has hampered criminology, and welcome his opening up of the debate, we argue that Coles has failed to make an important distinction between types...
Book
A taxi driver's life is dangerous work. Picking up a bad customer can leave the driver in a vulnerable position, and erring even once can prove fatal. To protect themselves, taxi drivers must quickly and accurately assess the trustworthiness of complete strangers. In Streetwise, Diego Gambetta and Heather Hamill take this predicament as a prototypi...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This is a collaborative research involving University of Durham (UK), University of Oxford (UK), and University of Cape Coast (Ghana) in collaboration with the National Institute for Medical Research in Tanzania.