Heather O'Neal Chambliss

Heather O'Neal Chambliss
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital · Medical Content Outreach

PhD

About

43
Publications
13,594
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
4,882
Citations
Introduction
Heather Chambliss, PhD, FACSM is a medical writer for Together (together.stjude.org) at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, TN. Her work focuses on content planning and development for online delivery of health information. Dr. Chambliss previously served as a faculty member in Health Promotion at the University of Memphis. Her research interests include health communication strategies, health behavior change, and physical activity promotion. Dr. Chambliss obtained her PhD from the University of Georgia and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at The Cooper Institute. She is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine and serves on ACSM’s Strategic Planning Committee and Exercise Is Medicine (EIM) Advisory Board.
Additional affiliations
January 2009 - August 2015
The University of Memphis
Position
  • Faculty Member
January 2002 - December 2005
The Cooper Institute
Position
  • Researcher
Education
August 1996 - May 2000
University of Georgia
Field of study
  • Exercise Science
August 1993 - August 1996
Louisiana Tech University
Field of study
  • Counseling Psychology

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Background: Functional impairments often remain despite symptomatic improvement with antidepressant treatment, supporting the need for novel treatment approaches. The present study examined the extent to which exercise augmentation improved several domains of psychosocial functioning and quality of life (QoL) among depressed participants. Methods...
Chapter
Behavior change is a difficult process. Increasing physical activity is particularly challenging because there are many barriers that impede physical activity and many influences that promote sedentary behavior. Therefore, health professionals must go beyond a traditional prescription model to influence change. The A's framework—Assess, Advise, Agr...
Article
Full-text available
Building on the framework of the Social Ecological Model (Stokols 1996), this study explored corporate social marketing in professional sport by evaluating a 12-week family-centered health promotion initiative delivered by a U.S. professional sport organization. Three families (n=10) participated in post-intervention focus groups to discuss their e...
Article
A majority of women do not meet the recommended levels of physical activity before and during pregnancy. Physically active women experience fewer complications of pregnancy such as gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and low back pain, to name only a few. Exercise is Medicine encourages adults to achieve a minimum of 150 min·...
Article
Relatively little is known about how perceived weight controllability influences important psychological health factors among adolescents. Thus, the purpose of this study is to explore adolescents' weight controllability beliefs and how those beliefs influence weight-related attitudes and behaviors. Adolescents (N = 369, mean age = 13.14, SD = 0.95...
Article
This study examined weight stereotypes among White and Hispanic youth. Specific objectives were to: (a) document stereotyped beliefs about fat vs. thin peers; (b) examine the extent to which stereotyped beliefs contribute to behavioral intentions toward fat vs. thin peers; and (c) explore potential differences in weight stereotypes and behavioral i...
Article
The use of augmentation strategies among patients with major depression is increasing because rates of complete remission with standard antidepressant monotherapy are quite low. Clinical and neurobiological data suggest that exercise may be a good candidate for use as an augmentation treatment for depression. This pilot study examined the use of ex...
Article
Research over the past 20 years has focused on the safety of physical activity during pregnancy. Guidelines for health care providers and pregnant/postpartum women have been developed front the results of these studies. The overwhelming results of most studies have shown few negative effects on the pregnancy of a healthy gravida, but rather, be ben...
Article
Despite recent advancements in the pharmacological treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), over half of patients who receive treatment with antidepressant medication do not achieve full remission of symptoms. There is evidence that exercise can reduce depressive symptomatology when used as a treatment for MDD. However, no randomized controlle...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual deficits and other behavioral disturbances such as anxiety-like behaviors can be observed in animals that have undergone social isolation, especially in species having important social interactions. Using a model of protracted social isolation in adult rats, we observed increased anxiety-like behavior and deficits in both the latency to init...
Article
To examine the effect of duration and frequency of exercise on weight loss and cardiorespiratory fitness in previously sedentary, overweight, women. Randomized, controlled, 4-arm trial of 12-months duration. A university-based behavioral weight loss program during the years 2000 and 2001. Eligibility criteria were: women, 21 to 45 years of age, bod...
Article
This study, conducted between 1998 and 2001 and analyzed in 2002 and 2003, was designed to test (1) whether exercise is an efficacious treatment for mild to moderate major depressive disorder (MDD), and (2) the dose-response relation of exercise and reduction in depressive symptoms. The study was a randomized 2x2 factorial design, plus placebo cont...
Article
Antifat attitudes and obesity bias are prevalent in Western society; however, little is known about the social meanings and connotations of weight-related words such as fat, overweight, and obese (e.g., Robison & Erdman, 1998). The purpose of this study was to explore college students' perceptions of weight-related terminology. Participants (n=131)...
Article
We examined the effects of chronic activity wheel running and imipramine administration on appetitive behavior after olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). Male Long-Evans rats were randomly assigned to the following conditions using a 2 x 2 x 2 design: (1) bilateral OBX or sham surgery, (2) voluntary activity wheel running or sedentary home cage, and (3) dai...
Article
The purpose of this research was to evaluate attitudes toward obese individuals and to identify personal characteristics associated with antifat bias among students majoring in exercise science. Undergraduate (N = 136) and graduate (N = 110) students (mean age 23.2 yr, 55% male, 77% Caucasian) completed a series of questionnaires to assess attitude...
Article
Obesity is at the forefront of the public health agenda. Why, with all the emphasis on the health risks of obesity and the availability of multiple treatment options, is it so difficult for people to successfully lose and maintain weight? The answer is simple: Most obesity treatment plans tell people what to do but not how to change their behavior....
Article
To determine the level of anti-fat bias in health professionals specializing in obesity and identify personal characteristics that correlate with both implicit and explicit bias. The Implicit Associations Test (IAT) and a self-report questionnaire assessing explicit attitudes, personal experiences with obesity, and demographic characteristics was a...
Article
We examined the effects of chronic activity wheel running and antidepressant treatment on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) messenger RNA (mRNA) in multiple brain regions-hippocampal formation (HF), ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra (VTA/SN), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and piriform cortex (PFx)-after bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBX)....
Article
The Depression Outcomes Study of Exercise (DOSE) was a randomized clinical trial to determine whether exercise is an efficacious treatment for mild to moderate major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults ages 20 to 45 years. The specific hypotheses under investigation were (1) active exercise is an efficacious monotherapy for mild to moderate levels...
Article
Despite advancements in exercise science research and the development of techniques to promote adherence, exercise adherence is often viewed pessimistically by those in the field of puhlic health and exercise science. It is me that exercise rates in the general population have not changed appreciably over the past two or three decades, and from thi...
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine the scientific evidence for a dose-response relation of physical activity with depressive and anxiety disorders. Computer database searches of MEDLINE, PsychLit, and Internet and personal retrieval systems to locate population studies, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), observational studies, and consensus...
Article
The effects of treadmill exercise training on prepro-galanin (GAL) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression in the locus coeruleus (LC) were examined. Male Fischer-344 rats (n=9) were assigned to 6 weeks of treadmill running. An additional group of animals comprised the sedentary home cage control group (n=9). Levels of GAL and TH messenger RN...
Article
Evidence obtained from anecdotal reports, clinical observations, epidemiological research and prospective studies suggests that physical activity may reduce an individual's risk for developing depression and may alleviate symptoms in persons with mild to moderate depression. However, many studies examining the antidepressant effects of exercise exh...
Article
National objectives for public health have targeted worksite as important settings for interventions to increase physical activity. However, expert reviews reveal no scientific consensus about the effectiveness of worksite interventions for increasing physical activity or fitness. We judged the quantity and quality of existing evidence against scie...
Article
This study compared the error rates on the 1990 and 1994 versions of the Self-Directed Search for a sample of 91 high school students (44 boys, 47 girls) of junior and senior standing. The two versions are different primarily in the wording and inclusion or exclusion of specific items. However, because both versions appear to be straightforward and...
Article
Evidence obtained from anecdotal reports, clinical observations, epidemiological research, and prospective studies suggests that physical activity may reduce an individual's risk for developing depression and may alleviate symptoms in persons with mild to moderate depression. However many studies examining the antidepressant effects of exercise exh...

Projects

Project (1)