He Yu

He Yu
Peking University | PKU · School of Life Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

12
Publications
12,173
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324
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
December 2021 - present
Peking University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
June 2021 - November 2021
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2018 - May 2021
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2013 - July 2018
Peking University
Field of study
  • Zoology, Population genetics
September 2008 - July 2012
Peking University
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
The distribution of the black rat (Rattus rattus) has been heavily influenced by its association with humans. The dispersal history of this non-native commensal rodent across Europe, however, remains poorly understood, and different introductions may have occurred during the Roman and medieval periods. Here, in order to reconstruct the population h...
Article
Full-text available
Sicily is a key region for understanding the agricultural transition in the Mediterranean, due to its central position. Here, we present genomic and stable isotopic data for 19 prehistoric Sicilians covering the Mesolithic to Bronze Age periods (10,700-4,100 yBP). We find that Early Mesolithic hunter-gatherers (HGs) from Sicily are a highly drifted...
Article
Full-text available
Modern humans expanded into Eurasia more than 40,000 years ago following their dispersal out of Africa. These Eurasians carried ~2–3% Neanderthal ancestry in their genomes, originating from admixture with Neanderthals that took place sometime between 50,000 and 60,000 years ago, probably in the Middle East. In Europe, the modern human expansion pre...
Article
Full-text available
The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau endemic Chinese mountain cat has a controversial taxonomic status, whether it is a true species or a wildcat ( Felis silvestris ) subspecies and whether it has contributed to cat ( F. s. catus ) domestication in East Asia. Here, we sampled F. silvestris lineages across China and sequenced 51 nuclear genomes, 55 mitogenomes...
Preprint
Full-text available
The distribution of the black rat ( Rattus rattus ) has been heavily influenced by its association with humans. The dispersal history of this non-native commensal rodent across Europe, however, remains poorly understood, and different introductions may have occurred during the Roman and medieval periods. Here, in order to reconstruct the population...
Preprint
Full-text available
The enigmatic Chinese mountain cat, endemic to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, has a controversial taxonomic status, whether a true species or conspecific with the wildcat (Felis silvestris ) and whether it may have contributed to the domestication of cats (F. s. catus ) in Asia. Here, we sampled 270 domestic and wild cats across China, sequenced 51 nuc...
Article
Modern humans have inhabited the Lake Baikal region since the Upper Paleolithic, though the precise history of its peoples over this long time span is still largely unknown. Here, we report genome-wide data from 19 Upper Paleolithic to Early Bronze Age individuals from this Siberian region. An Upper Paleolithic genome shows a direct link with the F...
Article
Full-text available
The Przewalski's gazelle (Procapra przewalskii) is one of the most endangered ungulates in the world, with fewer than 2,000 individuals surviving in nine habitat fragments on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and isolated by human settlements and infrastructure. In particular, the Qinghai-Tibet railway, which crosses the largest part of the gazelle's distr...
Article
Full-text available
Domestic cats exhibit abundant variations in tail morphology and serve as an excellent model to study the development and evolution of vertebrate tails. Cats with shortened and kinked tails were first recorded in the Malayan archipelago by Charles Darwin in 1868 and remain quite common today in Southeast and East Asia. To elucidate the genetic basi...
Article
Full-text available
The notion that animals can detect the Earth's magnetic field was once ridiculed, but is now well established. Yet the biological nature of such magnetosensing phenomenon remains unknown. Here, we report a putative magnetic receptor (Drosophila CG8198, here named MagR) and a multimeric magnetosensing rod-like protein complex, identified by theoreti...

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