He-Bo Peng

He-Bo Peng
University of Groningen | RUG

PhD

About

25
Publications
9,349
Reads
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367
Citations
Citations since 2017
21 Research Items
352 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100
Introduction
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - June 2015
Fudan University
Position
  • Master's Student

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
Invasion by smooth cordgrass ( Spartina alterniflora Loisel) has greatly impacted the intertidal ecosystems of China. Worldwide, chemical control is the most widely used method to control Spartina species, but it has not been widely implemented along the Chinese coast due to concerns about the potential impacts of herbicide residues on the environm...
Article
Full-text available
Migratory shorebirds are among the most threatened groups of birds. They rely on natural intertidal habitats outside the breeding season, but, to some extent have adjusted to using man‐made habitats. Here, we assessed the importance of coastal saltpans – a type of anthropogenic wetland – for feeding in migratory shorebirds during their northward mi...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Molluscs are important grazers, filter and deposit feeders, scavengers and predators, which in turn are food for shorebirds, fish and people. Some species, targeted as human food, have been cultured along the Chinese coast for hundreds of years. To examine whether aquacultural practices have meanwhile affected biodiversity gradients, we measure...
Article
Full-text available
The ecological reasons for variation in avian migration with some populations migrating across thousands of kilometres between breeding and non‐breeding areas with one or few refuelling stops, in contrast with others that stop more often, remain to be pinned down. Red Knots Calidris canutus are a textbook example of a shorebird species that makes l...
Article
Full-text available
The extent of intertidal flats in the Yellow Sea region has declined significantly in the past few decades, resulting in severe population declines in several waterbird species. The Yellow Sea region holds the primary stopover sites for many shorebirds during their migration to and from northern breeding grounds. However, the functional roles of th...
Article
Full-text available
1.Satellite‐based technologies that track individual animal movements enable the mapping of their spatial and temporal patterns of occurrence. This is particularly useful in poorly studied or remote regions where there is a need for the rapid gathering of relevant ecological knowledge to inform management actions. One such region is East Asia, wher...
Article
Full-text available
The Yellow Sea coastline in East Asia, an important staging area for migratory shorebirds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF), is rapidly deteriorating. Conserving the declining shorebird populations that rely on the Yellow Sea requires habitat protection and management based on sound ecological knowledge, especially on the seasonal occurr...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Yellow Sea coastline in East Asia, an important staging area for migratory shorebirds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF), is rapidly deteriorating. Conserving the declining shorebird populations that rely on the Yellow Sea requires habitat protection and management based on sound ecological knowledge, especially on the seasonal occurr...
Article
Full-text available
Organisms cope with environmental stressors by behavioral, morphological, and physiological adjustments. Documentation of such adjustments in the wild provides information on the response space in nature and the extent to which behavioral and bodily adjustments lead to appropriate performance effects. Here we studied the morphological and digestive...
Article
Full-text available
Many species depend on multiple habitats at different points in space and time. Their effective conservation requires an understanding of how and when each habitat is used, coupled with adequate protection. Migratory shorebirds use intertidal and supratidal wetlands, both of which are affected by coastal landscape change. Yet the extent to which sh...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Departure decisions and behaviors of migratory birds at stopover sites are expected to maximize fitness by trade-offs among avoiding predators, optimizing refueling (energy) capacity, and matching other life-history events. We predict that species with different body sizes and migratory destinations will exhibit different behaviors when...
Article
Full-text available
Many shorebird populations are in decline along the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. The rapid loss of coastal wetlands in the Yellow Sea, which provide critical stop-over sites during migration, is believed to be the cause of the alarming trends. The Yalu Jiang coastal wetland, a protected area in the north Yellow Sea, supports the largest known mi...
Poster
Site fidelity of endangered Great Knots (Calidris tenuirostris) and near-threaten Bar-tailed Godwits (Limosa lapponica) along China coast.
Article
Prompted by the realization that parts of the coast of southern Jiangsu Province, China, are under threat of reclamation, we here summarize evidence that loss of intertidal habitats around the Yellow Sea and at other parts along the Chinese and Korean coasts has already led to severe population declines of migratory shorebirds, including multiple e...
Article
The Yellow Sea region is of high global importance for waterbird populations, but recent systematic bird count data enabling identification of the most important sites are relatively sparse for some areas. Surveys of waterbirds at three sites on the coast of southern Jiangsu Province, China, in 2014 and 2015 produced peak counts of international im...
Article
Full-text available
During the high-tide period, shorebirds that forage on intertidal flats move to sites known as high-tide roosts, which play an important role in their survival. Understanding how shorebirds use high-tide roosts at stopover sites is crucial for their effective conservation and management. As there is a lack of natural roosting habitats along much of...
Article
Full-text available
Following the closure of the Saemangeum seawall in South Korea in 2006 the Yalu jiang National Nature Reserve, Liaoning, China became the most important staging site in the EAAF for Great Knots Calidris tenuirostris on northward migration. Biomass of their main bivalve prey species Potomacorbula laevis at Yalu jiang NNR has decreased greatly in rec...
Article
Full-text available
Selection of timing to match optimal environments is crucial for migrants that breed at high latitudes where there is a narrow time window suitable for breeding. However, birds generally depart from non-breeding grounds in a broad time window. How birds adjust their migration schedule to match optimal timing of arrival at breeding grounds is largel...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence-based protection of migratory birds at flyway levels requires a solid understanding of their use of ‘stopping sites’ during migration. To characterize the site use of northward-migration great knots Calidris tenuirostris in China, we compared length of stay and fuel deposition during northward migration at areas in the south and the north...

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