Hayden Henderson

Hayden Henderson
Stanford University | SU · Stanford Law School

Doctor of Psychology

About

20
Publications
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39
Citations
Introduction
Attending Stanford Law School (Fall 2021- Spring 2024). Worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Southern California under Professor Thomas Lyon, where our research sought ways to facilitate involvement of child and adolescent victims in the legal system. Completed PhD at the University of Cambridge under Professor Michael Lamb, examining the effectiveness of a pilot study implemented to improve the treatment of child victims in court.

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
Background Forensic interviewers are taught to ask children invitations using the word “time” to refer to a specific episode (e.g., “Tell me about the last time he touched you.”). However, children may interpret the word “time” as requesting conventional temporal information rather than narrative information. Objective We examined the rates at whi...
Article
Full-text available
Forensic interviewers ask children broad input-free recall questions about individual episodes in order to elicit complete narratives, often asking about “the first time,” “the last time,” and “one time.” An overlooked problem is that the word “time” is potentially ambiguous, referring both to a particular episode and to conventional temporal infor...
Article
Full-text available
Adolescents tend to be neglected in research examining child sexual abuse (CSA) interviews yet are often said to be particularly reluctant. This study examined reluctance among 119 10- to 17-year-old females questioned about suspected CSA (n = 25,942 responses), utilizing a scheme identifying previously overlooked types of reluctance in commerciall...
Article
Full-text available
In the United Kingdom, Section 27 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act permits ‘Achieving Best Evidence’ (ABE) forensic interviews to replace the evidence-in-chief in cases involving children. It is therefore imperative that forensic interviewers elicit complete, reliable, and coherent narratives from children. The goal of the current res...
Article
Full-text available
Forensic interviewers are taught to pair yes-no questions with open-ended requests for recall in order to reduce the likelihood that they will be misled by false “yes” responses. However, yes-no questions may elicit false “no” responses. Questioning 112 6- to 11-year-old maltreated children about three innocuous events (outside activities, yesterda...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the accuracy and narrative coherence of children’s accounts of a staged event across two interviews in comparison to a control condition to discern between the effects of repeated recall and delay between interviews. Seventy-six 8–11-year-olds took part in a first aid training session. Half of the children were randomly assi...
Article
Full-text available
Forensic interviewers are encouraged to elicit a practice narrative from children in order to train them to answer free recall questions with narrative information. Although asking children about their last birthday has been recommended, concerns have been raised that many children will have nothing to report. This study asked 994 4- to 9-year-old...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the effects of pre-trial preparation and pre-recorded cross-examinations on the linguistic complexity of recognition prompts (i.e., option posing or suggestive questions) used when questioning child victims in English criminal courts. The study also compared the linguistic complexity of recognition prompts that did and did not c...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the relation between law enforcement interviewing behaviors and commercially sexually exploited children’s (CSEC) reluctance. This study examined the relation between officers’ use of maximization, (references to) expertise, minimization, and support and adolescent CSEC victims’ reluctance in a small sample of police interview...
Article
Full-text available
Research has largely overlooked expressions of reluctance in commercially sexually exploited adolescent (“CSEA”) victims. This is problematic because gaining information from known victims is of the utmost importance in order to better serve the needs of current and potential future victims. The current study proposes a novel conceptualization of r...
Article
Full-text available
A consensus has emerged among forensic interviewers that narrative practice rapport building, introducing the allegation with a “why” question about the reason for the interview, and eliciting allegation details with invitations (broad free recall questions) constitute best practice. These methods are favored because they increase true reports with...
Article
Full-text available
Forensic interviewers are routinely advised to instruct children that they should indicate when they do not understand a question. This study examined whether administering the instruction with a practice question may help interviewers identify the means by which individual children signal incomprehension. We examined 446 interviews with children q...
Article
Full-text available
We propose that young children exhibit an order of encoding bias, such that they are inclined to report or act out events in the order in which they were originally encoded. This bias helps to explain why children assume that events they first hear described are in chronological order and why they often appear to understand “after” better than “bef...
Article
Full-text available
An ongoing challenge for forensic interviewers is to maximize their use of invitations, such as requests that the child “tell me more about” details mentioned by the child. Examining 434 interviews with 4- to 12-year-old children questioned about abuse, this study analyzed (1) faux invitations, in which interviewers prefaced questions with “tell me...
Thesis
Full-text available
This series of studies was the first to evaluate the effects of the Section 28 pilot study on the treatment of vulnerable child witnesses in English Crown Courts. Section 28 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act implemented mandatory Ground Rules Hearings, during which the judge, lawyers, and intermediary (if applicable) discussed appropri...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined whether the implementation of Section 28 (S28) of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act (1999) and the introduction of mandatory Ground Rules Hearings reduced the complexity of the questions English lawyers asked when examining child witnesses. This study compared cases with (n = 43) and without (n = 43) the S28 special me...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined whether the implementation of Section 28 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act (1999) improved lawyers’ questioning strategies when examining child witnesses in England. The government’s Section 28 pilot study involved judges holding Ground Rules Hearings, during which restrictions and limitations were placed on the dur...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Examining adolescent evasiveness strategies in forensic interviews (both adolescent sexual abuse victims and CSEC victims) and examining effects of interview support and inadequate support on evasiveness/reluctance.
Project
We are examining whether Section 28 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act significantly improved questioning strategies employed by lawyers, and whether this affected child responsiveness.