Harriet Zuckerman

Harriet Zuckerman
Columbia University | CU · Department of Sociology

Ph.D.

About

65
Publications
29,596
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4,390
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (65)
Article
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The sociology of science and the garfield effect: happy accidents, unpredictable developments and unexploited potentials.
Article
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Der Beitrag verfolgt die Rezeptionsgeschichte des von Robert K. Merton geprägten „Matthäus-Effekts“, der als Begriff und Konzept im Laufe der Zeit immer häufiger zitiert wurde und zunehmend an Einfluss gewann. Zunächst wird die von Merton prätendierte Bedeutung des Begriffes erläutert und im Anschluss daran seine Verbreitung in einer Vielzahl von F...
Article
Full-text available
[Excerpt] Never abundant, financial support for the “academic humanities” is now scarce. How scarce it is, both in absolute and relative terms, and whether the humanities now confront particularly hard times, are the pressing questions. To piece together an answer, we ask first how much the government, foundations, and private donors provide for th...
Book
Despite the worldwide prestige of America's doctoral programs in the humanities, all is not well in this area of higher education and hasn't been for some time. The content of graduate programs has undergone major changes, while high rates of student attrition, long times to degree, and financial burdens prevail. In response, the Andrew W. Mellon F...
Article
Full-text available
[Excerpt] In 1991 the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation launched the Graduate Education Initiative (GEI) to improve the structure and organization of PhD programs in the humanities and social sciences and to combat the high rates of student attrition and long time to degree completion prevailing in these fields. While attrition and time to completion wer...
Article
Full-text available
The chapters in Part I tell of the position of women in American science now and in the recent past. The second part examines the vexing question of the comparative research productivity of men and women scientists, while the third moves beyond science to treat professional women more generally. Part IV sets out a theory to account for disparities...
Article
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In the last two decades, prizes in the sciences have proliferated and, in particular, rich prizes with large honoraria. These developments raise several questions: Why have rich prizes proliferated? Have they greatly changed the reward system of science? What effects will such prizes have on scientists and on science? The proliferation of such priz...
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The Argument Written as one book, Science, Technology and Society in Seventeenth-Century England has become two. One book, treating Puritanism and science, has since become “The Merton Thesis.” The other, treating shifts of interest among the sciences and problem choice within the sciences, has been less consequential. This paper proposes that negl...
Article
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outline its [science's] distinctive social attributes, its research agenda—what sociologists of science study and why—and . . . indicate how work in the specialty ties in with sociological research more generally problems in the social structure and culture of science sociology of scientific knowledge (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all...
Article
Full-text available
Some science indicators can be found inSocial Indicators 1976 as well asScience Indicators-1976, but the coverage of science is limited. Neither volume contains data on cognitive aspects of science and technology or on their social consequences. The authors make suggestions for then-and-there assessments of cognitive advance in science and for pros...
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Based on a study of Nobel laureates in science, this article examines the strategy and tactics of interviewing members of an ultra-elite—the thin layer of individuals with the greatest influence, prestige, and power in an institutional sphere. It focuses in particular on techniques of legitimating the interview task and of tailoring interview sched...
Article
Scitation is the online home of leading journals and conference proceedings from AIP Publishing and AIP Member Societies
Article
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Nearly all scholarly journals use referees to screen submitted manuscripts. Physical scientists recognize the significance of the referee system: Some defend the system, and others attack it. But refereeing itself has not been systematically assessed. By studying the archives of The Physical Review for the years 1948 to 1956 (before the separate pu...
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Full-text available
Although differential ranking in science is not readily visible to lay observers, American science is, in fact, sharply graded. Rewards and facilities for research are concentrated among relatively few investigators and organizations. This distinctive pattern of stratification, at odds with the egalitarian ethos of science, is not solely attributab...
Article
Scitation is the online home of leading journals and conference proceedings from AIP Publishing and AIP Member Societies
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Columbia University, 1965. Includes bibliographical references. Microfilm.
Article
Full-text available
[Excerpt] In1991 the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation launched the Graduate Education Initiative (hereafter GEI) to improve the structure and organization of PhD programs in the humanities and social sciences. Such changes were seen as necessary to combat high rates of student attrition and long times-to-degree in these programs. While attrition and tim...
Article
Full-text available
Authorship practices in collaborative inquiries are an ambiguous guide to scientific contributions. The symbolic meanings attached to various orderings and the actual frequency of uses of name ordering patterns within various sciences and by Nobel laureates and other scientists are explored. A statistical model for assessing whether orders used dep...
Article
Full-text available
Nobel laureates in science publish more and are more apt to collaborate than a matched sample of scientists. Interviews with 41 of 55 laureates and comparison of their research output with the output of the matched sample indicate that these patterns hold at every stage of the life-work-cycle. As laureates report and as their publications corrobora...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
To identify the career paths of recipients of the PhD in the humanities, compare them to those in other disciplines, and lay out the determinants of getting tenure.