Harriet Thatcher

Harriet Thatcher
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · School of Biomedical Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

11
Publications
2,780
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82
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
82 Citations
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Introduction
I am broadly interested in behavioural ecology, with a particular interest in primates. My research focuses on how urban primates adapt to quantified anthropogenic pressures, considering multiple aspects of behavioural flexibility. I am interested in the multiple facets and scales of human-wildlife interactions and how we can apply this knowledge to create suitable management recommendations for human-wildlife coexistence.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
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Article
Urbanisation is rapidly transforming natural landscapes with consequences for biodiversity. Little is documented on the response of African wildlife to urbanisation. We reviewed case studies of vertebrate species’ responses to urbanisation in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa to determine trends. Connected habitat mosaics of natural and anthropogenic gre...
Article
Full-text available
The urban landscape is a complex mosaic of costs and benefits for urban wildlife. Although many species may adapt and thrive in the urban mosaic, the complexity of this landscape can be stressful and have health implications for urban wildlife, raising concerns for zoonosis and biodiversity. In this study, we assessed how human–primate interactions...
Article
Full-text available
Generalist wildlife species often thrive in urban environments because of increased anthropogenic resources. However, human-wildlife interactions, especially if negative, raise concerns for urban wildlife management. An enhanced understanding of wildlife behavioural flexibility has been suggested to be a key tool to provide educated and effective m...
Article
Attention bias is a new approach to assessing animal affect that has shown promising results in several animal species. It describes a tendency to preferentially attend to emotional compared to neutral cues and is influenced by underlying affect. It is important in the early days of this new field that we develop widely utilisable methods and incor...
Article
Full-text available
Many nonhuman primates adjust their behavior and thrive in human-altered habitats, including towns and cities. Studying anthropogenic influences from an animal’s perspective can increase our understanding of their behavioral flexibility, presenting important information for human–wildlife cohabitation management plans. Currently, research on anthro...
Preprint
Full-text available
Social attention is fundamental to a wide range of behaviours in non-human primates. However, we know very little about the heritability of social attention in non-human primates, and the heritability of attention to social threat has not been assessed. Here, we provide data to begin to fill this gap in knowledge. We tested 67 female rhesus macaque...
Article
Continuing urban developments are ecologically changing many landscapes. A greater understanding of how wildlife adapt behaviorally to these changes is necessary to inform management decisions. Time is a valuable resource to wildlife and a reflection of ecological pressures on the behavioral repertoire of an animal. Data on urban vervet monkey, Chl...
Article
Full-text available
Vervet monkeys, Chlorocebus pygerythrus, thrive in urban areas of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and present a suitable model to assess parasitic load as a measure of anthropogenic disturbance, such as urbanization. We collected vervet monkey faecal samples from four study sites representing a gradient of land use and urbanization. We assessed faecal...
Article
Full-text available
There has been increased recognition of the 3Rs in laboratory animal management over the last decade, including improvements in animal handling and housing. For example, positive reinforcement is now more widely used to encourage primates to cooperate with husbandry procedures, and improved enclosure design allows housing in social groups with oppo...

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Project (1)
Project
To understand how vervet monkeys behaviourally adapt to quantified anthropogenic pressures for the benefit of human wildlife coexistence.