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Harold D. B. S. Heorton

Harold D. B. S. Heorton
UCL · Earth Sciences

PhD Earth Sciences

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12
Publications
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95
Citations

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
This paper documents the retrieval of significant ocean surface wave heights in the Arctic Ocean from CryoSat-2 data. We use a semi-analytical model for an idealised synthetic aperture satellite radar or pulse-limited radar altimeter echo power. We develop a processing methodology that specifically considers both the Synthetic Aperture and Pulse Li...
Article
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The volume of Arctic sea ice is in decline but exhibits high interannual variability, which is driven primarily by atmospheric circulation. Through analysis of satellite-derived ice products and atmospheric reanalysis data, we show that winter 2020/21 was characterised by anomalously high sea-level pressure over the central Arctic Ocean, which resu...
Article
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Sea ice formation processes occur on sub‐grid scales and the detailed physics describing the processes are therefore not generally represented in climate models. One likely consequence of this is the premature closing of areas of open water in model simulations, which may result in a misrepresentation of heat and gas exchange between the ocean and...
Article
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For ice concentrations less than 85%, internal ice stresses in the sea ice pack are small and sea ice is said to be in free drift. The sea ice drift is then the result of a balance between Coriolis acceleration and stresses from the ocean and atmosphere. We investigate sea ice drift using data from individual drifting buoys as well as Arctic‐wide g...
Article
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The response of the subpolar Southern Ocean (sSO) to wind forcing is assessed using satellite radar altimetry. sSO sea level exhibits a phased, zonally coherent, bi‐modal adjustment to circumpolar wind changes, involving comparable seasonal and interannual variations. The adjustment is effected via a quasi‐instantaneous exchange of mass between the...
Article
Full-text available
The drift and deformation of sea ice floating on the polar oceans is caused by the applied wind and ocean currents. Over ocean basin length scales the internal stresses and boundary conditions of the sea ice pack result in observable deformation patterns. Cracks and leads can be observed in satellite images and within the velocity fields generated...
Article
Cracks in the sea ice cover break the barrier between the ocean and atmosphere, exposing the ocean to the cold atmosphere during the winter. These cracks are known as leads within the continuous sea ice pack and polynyas near land or ice shelves. Sea ice formation starts with frazil ice crystals in supercooled waters, which grow and precipitate to...
Article
Leads are cracks in sea ice that often form because of deformation. During winter months, leads expose the ocean to the cold atmosphere, resulting in supercooling and the formation of frazil ice crystals within the mixed layer. Here the authors investigate the role of frazil ice formation in leads on the mass balance of the sea ice pack through the...
Article
The sea ice edge presents a region of many feedback processes between the atmosphere, ocean, and sea ice (Maslowski et al.). Here the authors focus on the impact of on-ice atmospheric and oceanic flows at the sea ice edge. Mesoscale jet formation due to the Coriolis effect is well understood over sharp changes in surface roughness such as coastline...
Article
Sea ice components of Global Climate Models crudely parameterise processes at the edge of the sea ice cover leading to inaccuracies in calculating the location of the sea ice edge and thus the extent of the cover. Atmospheric jets are bands of modified wind velocity that form parallel to coastlines during on land winds. A similar formation is expec...

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