Harjo J De Poel

Harjo J De Poel
University of Groningen | RUG · Center for Human Movement Sciences

About

47
Publications
17,266
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1,177
Citations

Publications

Publications (47)
Preprint
In crew rowing, agents need to mutually coordinate their movements to achieve optimal performance (De Poel, De Brouwer, & Cuijpers, 2016). Traditionally, rowers aim to achieve perfect synchronous (in-phase) coordination. Somewhat counterintuitively, however, crew rowing in an antiphase pattern (i.e., alternating strokes) would actually be mechanica...
Article
Full-text available
The stability of rhythmic interlimb coordination is governed by the coupling between limb movements. While it is amply documented how coordinative performance depends on movement frequency, theoretical considerations and recent empirical findings suggest that interlimb coupling (and hence coordinative stability) is actually mediated more by movemen...
Article
Full-text available
The radical embodied cognition approach to behavior requires emphasis upon how humans adapt their motor skills in response to changes in constraint. The aim of this exploratory study was to identify how the typical coordination patterns used to tread water were influenced by constraints representative of open water environments. Twenty-three partic...
Poster
Full-text available
Abstract Research on coordination between cyclical processes often involves calculation of phase angles, for instance to determine the phase relation between two (or more) oscillating time series. As accurate phase analysis requires near-to-harmonic oscillations, several methodological studies already illustrated the importance of appropriate norma...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Crew rowing is often quoted as a natural example of perfect unity. A crew of rowers aims to optimize performance by perfectly moving in synchrony, while they apply all their power at maximum stroke rate. But do they necessarily need to move in in-phase synchrony? It has been suggested that crew members may complement each other’s movements by rowin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Crew rowing is often quoted as a natural example of perfect unity. A crew of rowers aims to optimize performance by perfectly moving in synchrony, while they apply all their power at maximum stroke rate. But do they necessarily need to move in in-phase synchrony? It has been suggested that crew members may complement each other’s movements by rowin...
Article
Full-text available
There was an error in the calculation of the standard deviation of the continuous relative phase measure (SDϕ). The standard deviation was calculated on the absoluted continuous relative phase values. Therefore, the reported SDϕ‐values were underestimated. As such, in the present erratum we based the relation between crew coordination consistency a...
Article
Dynamic situations, such as interactive sports or walking on a busy street, impose high demands on a person's ability to interact with (others in) its environment (i.e., 'interact-ability'). The current study examined how distance regulation, a fundamental component of these interactions, is mediated by different sources of visual information. Part...
Article
Full-text available
Although most research on interpersonal coordination focuses on perceptual forms of interaction, many interpersonal actions also involve interactions of mechanical nature. We examined the effect of mechanical coupling in a rowing task from a coupled oscillator perspective: 16 pairs of rowers rowed on ergometers that were physically connected throug...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In crew rowing, agents need to coordinate their movements to achieve optimal performance. Although, traditionally, rowers aim to move perfectly in sync, it has been suggested that rowing in antiphase may actually be mechanically more efficient. From coordination dynamics, the antiphase pattern is expected to be less stable, especially with an incre...
Poster
Although most research on interpersonal coordination focuses on perceptual forms of interaction [1], many interpersonal tasks, such as crew rowing, also involve interactions of mechanical nature. There is no way to escape from such mechanical influences, as agents physically move each other. As such, the stringent nature of the mechanical coupling...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Traditionally, rowers aim to row perfectly in sync (in-phase coordination) to achieve optimal performance. However, it has been suggested that when rowers perfectly alternate their strokes (i.e., antiphase coordination), velocity fluctuations of the boat are minimized, which reduces power losses to 5% [1,2] and hence might theoretically result in a...
Chapter
Interpersonal coordination in sports can be studied by examining interactions between agents. Evidently, individuals differ in their ability to interact with others (cf. ‘interact-ability’), which critically depends on their sensitivity to information for (inter-)action. Recently, we found that agents could access different information sources for...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In crew rowing, agents need to mutually coordinate their movements to achieve optimal performance (De Poel, De Brouwer, & Cuijpers, 2016). Traditionally, rowers aim to achieve perfect synchronous (in-phase) coordination. Somewhat counterintuitively, however, crew rowing in an antiphase pattern (i.e., alternating strokes) would actually be mechanica...
Article
Regulating distance with a moving object or person is a key component of human movement and of skillful interpersonal coordination. The current set of experiments aimed to assess the role of gait mode and body orientation on distance regulation using a cyclical locomotor tracking task in which participants followed a virtual leader. In the first ex...
Article
In a recent observation article in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance (JEP:HPP; Varlet & Richardson, 2015) the 100-m sprint final of the World Championship in Athletics in Berlin of 2009 (i.e., the current world record race) was analyzed. That study reported occurrence of spontaneous, unintentional interpersonal sy...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
While ample literature focusses on the perceptual nature of between-agent interaction, agents are often also physically connected, such as in crew rowing. Curiously, antiphase crew coordination may be mechanically more efficient because it reduces the power lost to shell velocity fluctuations (1,2). However, coupled oscillator dynamics predicts the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In crew rowing, synchronisation between crew members is regarded as one of the main determinants for optimal crew performance. To coincide in a common rhythm, rowers need to be accurate and consistent in the timing of their strokes. In rowing practice stroke rates vary from 18 strokes per minute (spm) during endurance training up to 42 spm during r...
Article
Full-text available
Coupled oscillators provide a pertinent model approach to study between-person movement dynamics. While ample literature in this respect has considered the influence of external/environmental constraints and/or effects of a difference between the two agents' individual component dynamics (e.g., mismatch in natural frequency), recent studies also st...
Article
In crew rowing, crew members need to mutually synchronize their movements to achieve optimal crew performance. Intuitively, poor crew coordination is often deemed to involve additional boat movements such as surge velocity fluctuations, heave, pitch, and roll, which would imply lower efficiency (eg, due to increased hydrodynamic drag). The aim of t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In crew rowing, agents need to coordinate their movements while physically connected through the boat they share. Modelling a rowing crew as a system of coupled oscillators predicts that the stability of crew coordination decreases with increasing stroke rate. However, rowing literature suggests that crew synchronisation might actually improve at h...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Interpersonal coordination in sports can be studied by examining interactions between agents. Evidently, individuals differ in their ability to interact with others (cf. ‘interact-ability’), which critically depends on their sensitivity to information for (inter-)action. Recently, we found that agents could access different information sources for...
Article
Full-text available
In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, coupled oscillator dynamics predict the stability of the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In crew rowing, agents need to perfectly coincide into a common rhythm. In fact, the interpersonal synchronisation is regarded as one of the main determinants for optimal crew performance. A rowing crew can vary the timing of the strokes, yielding stroke rates from 18 strokes per minute (spm) during endurance training up to 42 spm during racing. Mo...
Article
Coordinating one's movements with others is an important aspect of human interactions. Regulating the distance to other moving agents is often necessary to achieve specific task goals such as in invasion sports. This study aimed to examine how distance regulation is mediated by different sources of information that are typically available when huma...
Article
Full-text available
In interactive sports, teammates and/or opponents mutually tune their behavior. Expert performance thus implies certain interactive abilities, which critically depend on perceptual coupling. To illustrate this assertion, we examined the coordination dynamics with asymmetric interaction of dyads performing a sports-related cyclical movement task. In...
Article
Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) is a common injury in sports that comprise jump actions. This article systematically reviews the literature examining the relation between patellar tendinopathy and take-off and landing kinematics in order to uncover risk factors and potential prevention strategies. A systematic search of the Pubmed, Embase and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In interactive (team) sports, interpersonal coordination is a highly complex process that requires further analysis. Interacting with another person typically demands online movement adaptation, this capacity is based upon an individual’s ability to find and couple to the relevant information that specifies a pertinent response. The theoretical fra...
Article
Full-text available
To extend research on decision-making in sport we addressed the choices vol-leyball-players are faced with in a simple volleyball pass-return task. We manipu-lated the distance that eight experienced volleyball players had to cover for success-ful ball passing, and mapped their passing technique (i.e., overhead or underhand) and ball return accurac...
Article
Full-text available
It is generally accepted that crew rowing requires perfect synchronization between the movements of the rowers. However, a long-standing and somewhat counterintuitive idea is that out-of-phase crew rowing might have benefits over in-phase (i.e., synchronous) rowing. In synchronous rowing, 5 to 6% of the power produced by the rower(s) is lost to vel...
Article
Full-text available
In soccer, critical match events like goal attempts can be preceded by periods of instability in the balance between the two teams' behaviours. Therefore, we determined periods of high variability in the distance between the teams' centroid positions longitudinally and laterally in an international-standard soccer match and evaluated corresponding...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of agency has been central to ecological approaches to psychology. Gibson, one of the founders of this movement, made room for this concept by arguing against the mechanistic conceptions in psychology. In his view, the environment is not a collection of causes that pushes the animal around, but consist of action possibilities, which he...
Article
Full-text available
A prerequisite for accurate passing in association football is that a player perceives the affordances, that is, the opportunities for action, of a given situation. The present study examined how affordances shape passing in association football by comparing the performance of pass-kicks in two task conditions. Participants performed pass-kicks int...
Article
Full-text available
Attentional asymmetry in rhythmic interlimb coordination induces an asymmetry in relative phase dynamics, allegedly reflecting an asymmetry in coupling strength. However, relative phase asymmetries may also be engendered by an attention-induced difference between the amplitudes (and hence the preferred frequencies) of the limb movements. The author...
Article
In the past few years, the use of motor imagery as an adjunct to other forms of training has been studied extensively. However, very little attention has been paid to how imagery could be used to greatest effect. It is well known that the provision of external cues has a beneficial effect on motor skill acquisition and performance during physical p...
Article
Full-text available
The relation between movement amplitude and the strength of interlimb interactions was examined by comparing bimanual performance at different amplitude ratios (1:2, 1:1, and 2:1). For conditions with unequal amplitudes, the arm moving at the smaller amplitude was predicted to be more strongly affected by the contralateral arm than vice versa. This...
Article
Wanneer je je beide handen simultaan beweegt, worden deze onderling door elkaar beïnvloed. Deze zogenoemde bimanuele interacties (ofwel koppelingen) komen bijvoorbeeld naar voren bij het bekende ‘tikken op het hoofd en rondjes draaien op de buik’. Al zijn de individuele bewegingen noch zo simpel, door die interacties is het zonder speciale oefening...
Article
Full-text available
Peters (J Motor Behav 21:151-155, 1989; Interlimb coordination: neural, dynamical and cognitive constraints, Academic, Orlando, pp 595-615, 1994) suggested that expressions of handedness in bimanual coordination may be reflections of an inherent attentional bias. Indeed, previous results indicated that focusing attention on one of the limbs affecte...
Article
The effects of handedness on bimanual isofrequency coordination (e.g., phase advance of the dominant limb) have been suggested to result from an asymmetry in interlimb coupling strength, with the non-dominant limb being more strongly influenced by the dominant limb than vice versa. A formalized version of this hypothesis was tested by examining the...
Article
Full-text available
Based on indications that hand dominance is characterized by asymmetrical interlimb coupling strength (with the dominant hand exerting stronger influences on the nondominant hand than vice versa), intentional switches between rhythmic bimanual coordination patterns were predicted to be mediated primarily by phase adaptations in the movements of the...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
In my dissertation “Coordination dynamics of crew rowing” I experimentally studied antiphase rowing, which is theoretically faster but had never been empirically tested on water. My experiments in the lab and on the water generated novel predictions for dynamical systems theory, and showed the expediency of using real-world tasks to test theory on human interaction. I developed and programmed the Remo measurement system to test crew performance on water.
Archived project
Studying distance regulation between people as a part of my PhD at the University of Otago.