Hao Ran Lai

Hao Ran Lai
University of Canterbury | UC · School of Biological Sciences

PhD
Demography, plant-plant interactions, species distributions, transferability

About

24
Publications
8,822
Reads
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433
Citations
Citations since 2016
22 Research Items
430 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Introduction
Flattening its multidimensional space, the "sphere" of Hao Ran's research interest seems to have its centroid around functional traits, community plant ecology, and succession with applied topics on the side. The boundaries can be fuzzy.
Additional affiliations
July 2012 - June 2013
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Tutor
Description
  • Statistics and experimental design course STAT1201
February 2012 - October 2013
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Tutor
Description
  • Ecology course BIOL2010, and Plant Biology course AGRC1021 & BIOL1040
January 2012 - December 2014
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • 1. Southwestern Australia annual system - empirical testing of coexistence theories 2. Eastern Australia rainforest - functional and species change following logging along climatic gradient
Education
July 2009 - November 2012
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Ecology

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
1.Understanding how functional traits moderate species’ demographic responses along environmental gradients is a core pursuit in ecology, often to predict how species abundances will respond to a rapidly changing environment. The latter necessitates species demography, or at least abundance, to be modelled directly as a response; yet most studies t...
Article
Full-text available
Questions How (de)coupled are native and exotic tree diversities in their relationships with local soil conditions and landscape configurations? Can (de)coupled diversity–environment relationships be used to manage native and exotic species separately to minimize unintended impacts on one another? Location The tropical city‐state of Singapore, So...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying generalisable processes that underpin population dynamics is crucial for understanding successional patterns. While longitudinal or chronosequence data are powerful tools for doing so, the traditional focus on community-level shifts in taxonomic and functional composition rather than species-level trait–demography relationships has made...
Article
Full-text available
Growth in individual size or biomass is a key demographic component in population models, with wide‐ranging applications from quantifying species performance across abiotic or biotic conditions to assessing landscape‐level dynamics under global change. In forest ecology, the responses of tree growth to biotic interactions are widely held to be cruc...
Article
Full-text available
Context Tropical forest loss has a major impact on climate change. Secondary forest growth has potential to mitigate these impacts, but uncertainty regarding future land use, remote sensing limitations, and carbon model accuracy have inhibited understanding the range of potential future carbon dynamics. Objectives We evaluated the effects of four...
Preprint
Full-text available
The realised niche is jointly shaped by both abiotic and biotic processes. Moreover, the strength and direction of biotic interactions may vary across abiotic conditions and generate non-additivities that, if ignored, could lead to inaccurate predictions of species responses to changes in environment and composition. We tested this idea by analysin...
Article
Full-text available
We introduce the AusTraits database - a compilation of values of plant traits for taxa in the Australian flora (hereafter AusTraits). AusTraits synthesises data on 448 traits across 28,640 taxa from field campaigns, published literature, taxonomic monographs, and individual taxon descriptions. Traits vary in scope from physiological measures of per...
Article
Full-text available
Functional traits offer generalizability to the prediction of ecosystem processes such as production, and community-weighted mean trait values are increasingly used for such predictions. However, the underlying causal direction between traits and ecosystem processes are often indirect and sometimes even tenuous. In this study, we aimed to uncover u...
Preprint
Full-text available
Growth in individual size or biomass is a key demographic component in population models, with wide-ranging applications from quantifying species performance across abiotic or biotic conditions to assessing landscape-level dynamics under global change. In forest ecology, the responses of tree growth to biotic interactions are widely held to be cruc...
Preprint
Full-text available
We introduce the AusTraits database - a compilation of measurements of plant traits for taxa in the Australian flora (hereafter AusTraits). AusTraits synthesises data on 375 traits across 29230 taxa from field campaigns, published literature, taxonomic monographs, and individual taxa descriptions. Traits vary in scope from physiological measures of...
Article
Full-text available
Trees are important components of urban greenery because of their large stature and longevity, and their ability to enhance the environmental quality of city landscapes. However, benefits and hazards associated with trees depend on their size, which changes over time and varies among species. While urban trees are often measured during routine mana...
Article
Elevated levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) pose health risks to populations living in many cities worldwide. To remediate the impact of air pollution, urban greening has been increasingly explored as a possible way to remove PM from the surroundings. However, existing research focuses mainly on species-specific assessments within temperate...
Article
Full-text available
Questions How do abiotic conditions, forest structure, as well as taxonomic and functional diversities and composition recover after wind‐generated treefalls? Do young and old‐growth secondary forests differ in their responses? Location Mandai region of the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, Singapore, where extensive treefalls occurred during an u...
Article
1.Climate change is predicted to have profound consequences for multispecies coexistence, and thus, patterns of biological diversity. These consequences will be mediated by direct and indirect impacts of environmental change on species’ vital rates and interactions. While the impacts of environmental change on individual species has received much a...
Article
Full-text available
1.Soil resource partitioning and dispersal limitation have been shown to shape the tree community structure of mature tropical forests, but are poorly studied in the context of forest succession. We examined the relative contributions of both ecological processes to the variation in the species composition of young tropical secondary forests at dif...
Article
Background: According to modern coexistence theory, ecologically similar species can coexist if fitness differences between them are small, or niche differences between them are large. However, these predictions have not been tested extensively in real systems and are difficult to examine in traits-based studies. Aims: The aim of our study was by u...
Article
Full-text available
Coexistence between plant species is well known to depend on the outcomes of species interactions within an environmental context. The incorporation of environmental variation into empirical studies of coexistence are rare, however, due to the complex experiments needed to do so and the lack of feasible modelling approaches for determining how envi...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen-fixing trees (N2 fixers) provide new nitrogen critical for rapid biomass accumulation of tropical forests during early secondary succession, but it remains unclear how the abundance of N2 fixers in the forest community affects the growth of non-fixers or the primary productivity of the whole forest. On the one hand, N2 fixers may enhance f...
Article
Full-text available
1.Community ecology is frequently invoked as complementary to and useful for guiding ecological restoration. While the conceptual literature is devoted to this unification, first-hand accounts from practitioners and ecologists suggest that integration may be weak in practice. To date, there have been no analyses of how extensively community ecology...
Article
A rich literature on forest succession provides general expectations for the steps forests go through while reassembling after disturbance, yet we still have a surprisingly poor understanding of why the outcomes of forest recovery after logging (or other disturbances) vary so extensively. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that regional species...
Article
Secondary forests are important carbon sinks, but their biomass dynamics vary markedly within and across landscapes. The biotic and abiotic drivers of this variation are still not well understood. We tested the effects of soil resource availability and competition by lianas on the biomass dynamics of young secondary tropical forests in Panama and a...
Article
Alien plant species are known to have a wide range of impacts on recipient communities, from resident species' exclusions to coexistence with resident species. It remains unclear; however, if this variety of impacts is due to different invader strategies, features of recipient communities or both. To test this, we examined multiple plant invasions...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods There is a pressing need to understand how communities reassemble following human land-use change and how they differ from unmodified communities. It is often assumed that land-use changes and habitat destruction lead to species loss and corresponding loss of functional trait diversity – a common proxy for ecosystem fu...

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