Hany Dweck

Hany Dweck
Yale University | YU · Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

PhD

About

88
Publications
11,117
Reads
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1,764
Citations
Citations since 2017
27 Research Items
1332 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
Additional affiliations
April 2015 - June 2016
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Position
  • Project Manager
August 2004 - October 2008
Cairo University
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (88)
Preprint
The agricultural pest Drosophila suzukii differs from most other Drosophila species in that it lays eggs in ripe, rather than overripe, fruit. Previously we showed that changes in bitter taste sensation accompanied this adaptation (Dweck et al., 2021). Here we show that D. suzukii has also undergone a variety of changes in sweet taste sensation. D....
Article
Salt taste is one of the most ancient of all sensory modalities. However, the molecular basis of salt taste remains unclear in invertebrates. Here, we show that the response to low, appetitive salt concentrations in Drosophila depends on Ir56b, an atypical member of the ionotropic receptor (Ir) family. Ir56b acts in concert with two coreceptors, Ir...
Article
Full-text available
Insects use sex pheromones as a reproductive isolating mechanism to attract conspecifics and repel heterospecifics. Despite the profound knowledge of sex pheromones, little is known about the coevolutionary mechanisms and constraints on their production and detection. Using whole-genome sequences to infer the kinship among 99 drosophilids, we inves...
Preprint
Adaptations to anthropogenic domestic habitats contribute to the success of mosquito Aedes aegypti as a major global vector of several arboviral diseases. The species inhabited African forests before expanding into domestic habitats and spreading to the rest of the world. Despite a well-studied evolutionary history, how this species initially moved...
Preprint
Full-text available
Insects use sex pheromones as a reproductive isolating mechanism to attract conspecifics and repel heterospecifics. Despite the profound knowledge of sex pheromones, little is known about the coevolutionary mechanisms and constraints on their production and detection. Using whole-genome sequences to infer the kinship among 99 drosophilids, we inves...
Method
Full-text available
Generation of Drosophila mojavensis loss-of-function alleles using CRISPR/Cas9. Link: https://en.bio-protocol.org/prep413
Preprint
Full-text available
The theory of ecological divergence provides a useful framework to understand the adaptation of many species to anthropogenic ("domestic") habitats. The mosquito Aedes aegypti , a global vector of several arboviral diseases, presents an excellent study system. Ae. aegypti originated in African forests, but the populations that invaded other contine...
Article
Full-text available
Communication mechanisms underlying the sexual isolation of species are poorly understood. Using four sub-species of Drosophila mojavensis as a model, we identify two behaviorally active, male-specific pheromones. One functions as a conserved male antiaphrodisiac in all subspecies and acts via gustation. The second induces female receptivity via ol...
Article
Taste systems detect a vast diversity of toxins, which are perceived as bitter. When a species adapts to a new environment, its taste system must adapt to detect new death threats. We deleted each of six commonly expressed bitter gustatory receptors (Grs) from Drosophila melanogaster. Systematic analysis revealed that requirements for these Grs dif...
Preprint
Full-text available
Signaling mechanisms underlying the sexual isolation of species are poorly understood. Using four subspecies of Drosophila mojavensis as a model, we identify two behaviorally active male-specific pheromones. One functions as a conserved male anti-aphrodisiac in all subspecies and acts via gustation. The second induces female receptivity via olfacti...
Article
Full-text available
Background Mate finding and recognition in animals evolves during niche adaptation and involves social signals and habitat cues. Drosophila melanogaster and related species are known to be attracted to fermenting fruit for feeding and egg-laying, which poses the question of whether species-specific fly odours contribute to long-range premating comm...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Odor information is processed through multiple receptor-glomerular channels in the first order olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), then reformatted into higher brain centers and eventually perceived by the fly. To reveal the logic of olfaction, it is fundamental to map odor representations from the glomerular channels into higher...
Article
Full-text available
Background Odor information is processed through multiple receptor-glomerular channels in the first order olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), then reformatted into higher brain centers and eventually perceived by the fly. To reveal the logic of olfaction, it is fundamental to map odor representations from the glomerular channels into higher b...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mate recognition in animals evolves during niche adaptation and involves habitat and social olfactory signals. Drosophila melanogaster is attracted to fermenting fruit for feeding and egg-laying. We show that, in addition, female flies release a pheromone ( Z )-4-undecenal ( Z 4-11Al), that elicits flight attraction in both sexes. The biosynthetic...
Data
Movie S3. Activation of dsx+ Neurons in Females Induces Male-like Courtship Behaviors toward a Wild-Type Female, Related to Figure 1 Movie showing a dsxbrain>TrpA1 virgin female displaying male-typical courtship behaviors, such as following and wing extension, directed towards a wild-type female when thermally activated (at 33°C).
Data
Movie S1. dsxbrain>TrpA1 Females Are Normally Courted by a Wild-Type Male at 22°C, Related to Figure 1 Movie showing a wild-type male displaying normal courtship behaviors towards a dsxbrain>TrpA1 female at the control temperature (22°C).
Data
Movie S2. Activation of dsx+ Neurons in Females Induces Male-like Courtship Behaviors toward a Wild-Type Male, Related to Figure 1 Movie showing a dsxbrain>TrpA1 virgin female displaying male-typical courtship behaviors, such as following and wing extension, directed towards a wild-type male when thermally activated (at 33°C).
Article
Full-text available
Olfactory glomeruli are morphologically conserved spherical compartments of the olfactory system, solely distinguishable by their chemosensory repertoire, anatomical position and volume. Little is known, however, about their numerical neuronal composition. We therefore characterized their neuronal architecture and correlated these anatomical featur...
Article
Full-text available
Courtship in Drosophila melanogaster offers a powerful experimental paradigm for the study of innate sexually dimorphic behaviors [1, 2]. Fruit fly males exhibit an elaborate courtship display toward a potential mate [1, 2]. Females never actively court males, but their response to the male's display determines whether mating will actually occur. S...
Data
Full-text available
The vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster is equipped with two peripheral olfactory organs, antenna and maxillary palp. The antenna is involved in finding food, oviposition sites and mates. However, the functional significance of the maxillary palp remained unknown. Here, we screened the olfactory sensory neurons of the maxillary palp (MP-OSNs) using...
Data
Raw data of all behavioral experiments with D. melanogaster presented in Figure 5.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.022
Data
Raw data of wind-tunnel experiments performed with female and male D. melanogaster presented in Figure 5—figure supplement 2.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.026
Data
Raw data of physiological and behavioral responses of D. suzukii presented in Figure 6.Raw data of D. melanogaster results from the same figure can be found in Figure 3—source data 1.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.028
Data
Presence and absence data as well as physicochemical properties of all tested odor samples, that were used to calculate the NMDS plot and the PCAs in Figure 1.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.003
Data
Raw data for all dose-dependency curves presented in Figure 2.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.014
Data
Gene sequences. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.029
Data
Raw data for all GC-SSR results presented in Figure 3.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.016
Data
Raw data of the comparison of antennal and palp OSN-responses to the best ligands of palp OSNs presented in Figure 4.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.018
Data
Raw data of all behavioral experiments with D. melanogaster and palp activating odors at high concentration presented in Figure 5—figure supplement 1.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.024
Article
Full-text available
Detecting danger is one of the foremost tasks for a neural system. Larval parasitoids constitute clear danger to Drosophila, as up to 80% of fly larvae become parasitized in nature. We show that Drosophila melanogaster larvae and adults avoid sites smelling of the main parasitoid enemies, Leptopilina wasps. This avoidance is mediated via a highly s...
Data
Raw data the figures of this manuscript are based on. (XLSX)
Data
Iridoid compounds produced by L. boulardi and L. heterotoma. Total ion current (TIC) chromatograms on a nonpolar (BPX5) GC column of an extract of females of (A) L. boulardi and (B) L. heterotoma. (C) Molecular structure of the iridoid compounds found in L. boulardi and L. heterotoma. Numbers correspond to the peaks in (A) and (B). (D–G) Identifica...
Data
Diagnostic set of odors used to identify OSNs during SSRs. OSNs that are expected to exhibit strong responses to a specific odor are given in brackets. (TIF)
Data
Electrophysiological recordings with Drosophila OSNs and wasp odours. (A–D) SSR responses of wildtype ab10B neurons tested with the headspace (A) or wash (B) of L. boulardi, or synthetic (-)-iridomyrmecin (C), (R)-actinidine (D), or nepetelactol (a mixture of 1S4aR7R7aS-Nepetalactol, 1R4aS7S7aS-Nepetalactol and their enantiomers) (E). (F) Dorsal-o...
Data
Odor panel used to screen Or49a and Or85f in the empty neuron system, color-coded by functional group (red, alcohols; blue, esters; gray, acids; brown, ketones; pink, aldehydes; light green, nitrogen-containing compounds; purple, terpenes; dark green, alkanes; black, other compounds). (TIF)
Data
Localization of OSNs expressing Or49a on the antenna of a female D. melanogaster. OSNs are visualized by expressing GCaMP3.0 under control of Gal4-Or49a driver line. (TIF)
Data
Response profiles of neurons paired with iridomyrmecin-, actinidine-, and nepetalactol -responsive neurons shown in Fig 4C (n = 3). Error bars represent standard error of the mean (SEM). (TIF)
Data
GC-SSR responses of a neuron misexpressing Or49a to different isomers of iridomyrmecin. Top line named with the compound depicts the flame ionization detector (FID) signal of the GC. (TIF)
Data
GC-SSR responses of a neuron misexpressing Or85f to different isomers of actinidine and nepetalactol. Top line named with the compound depicts the FID signal of the GC. (TIF)
Data
Behavioral avoidance of synthetic compounds. Larval choice assay and oviposition assay and resulting preference indices when exposed to the synthetic (-)-iridomyrmecin and (R)-actinidine. Deviation of the indices against zero was tested with Wilcoxon rank sum test. Asterisks, p < 0.05; error bars depict standard deviation. PI = (number of larvae, f...
Article
Significance Mating interactions in Drosophila melanogaster depend on a number of sensory cues targeting different modalities like hearing, taste, and olfaction. From an olfactory perspective, only negative fly-derived signals had been identified, whereas a positive signal mediating mating was missing. Here we demonstrate the presence of such a sig...
Article
Full-text available
Herbivorous insects are extraordinarily successful. Half of the world’s extant insects and one quarter of all living metazoan species belong to herbivorous insect lineages (1, 2). Although feeding on living plant tissue is an evolutionarily difficult transition, herbivorous insect lineages are more diverse than their nonherbivorous relatives (3, 4)...
Article
Dietary antioxidants play an important role in preventing oxidative stress. Whether animals in search of food or brood sites are able to judge the antioxidant content, and if so actively seek out resources with enriched antioxidant content, remains unclear. We show here that the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster detects the presence of hydroxycin...
Data
Excel file of mean responses and baseline firing rate of the different OSN classes of L.y-signata, T. domestica, P.siccifolium, and D. melanogaster.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.006
Data
Amino acid sequences of putative olfactory and gustatory receptors of L. y-signata, T. domestica, and P. siccifolium.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.010
Data
Amino acid sequences of putative variant ionotropic glutamate receptors of L. y-signata, T. domestica, and P. siccifolium.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.021
Data
Full-text available
Tree file resulting from the MSA of Figure 8—source data 3 containing node support values.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.025
Data
Nucleotide sequences of putative variant ionotropic glutamate receptors of L. y-signata, T. domestica, and P. siccifolium.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.022
Data
Nucleotide sequences of putative olfactory and gustatory receptors of L. y-signata, T. domestica, and P. siccifolium.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.011
Data
MAFFT-alignment of OR and GR candidates of L. y-signata, T. domestica, P. siccifolium and D. melanogaster (Clyne et al., 1999, Gao and Chess, 1999, Vosshall et al., 1999) and Apis mellifera (Robertson and Wanner, 2006) GR and OR proteins, as well as Daphnia pulex GRs done.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.012
Data
FastTree file resulting from the MSA of Figure 4—source data 3 (can be opened with FigTree).DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.013
Data
Full-text available
Tree file resulting from the MSA of Figure 4—source data 3 containing node support values (can be opened e.g., with Adobe Illustrator).DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.014
Data
FastTree file resulting from the MSA of Figure 4—source data 3 (can be opened with FigTree).DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.024
Data
Primers and their properties used in this study.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.017
Data
MAFFT amino acid alignment of iGluR and IR candidates of L. y-signata, T. domestica, P. siccifolium, D. melanogaster, and D. pulex (D. melanogaster and D. pulex sequences were sequences taken from Croset et al., 2010).DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.023
Article
Egg-laying animals, such as insects, ensure the survival of their offspring by depositing their eggs in favorable environments. To identify suitable oviposition sites, insects, such as the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster, assess a complex range of features. The fly selectively lays eggs in fermenting fruit. However, the precise cues and conditi...
Article
Full-text available
Divergence in host adaptive traits has been well studied from an ecological and evolutionary perspective, but identification of the proximate mechanisms underlying such divergence is less well understood. Behavioral preferences for host plants are often mediated by olfaction and shifts in preference may be accompanied by changes in the olfactory sy...
Data
Full-text available
Analysis of host plant volatile composition with cactus rot stage. Cacti were either uninoculated (NI) or inoculated and fermented for one to nine weeks. Peak numbers correspond to the list of volatiles. (A–D) Typical gas chromatograms of barrel, prickly pear, organ pipe and agria headspace (respectively) from uninoculated or representative ferment...
Data
Full-text available
Relative amounts of volatile compounds in uninoculated and inoculated cacti. Volatile compounds (mean ± stdev) emitted from barrel, prickly pear, organ pipe and agria cacti. (PDF)
Data
Full-text available
Analysis of variance for all experiments. (A–D) Experiments testing preference for different fermentation stages of barrel, prickly pear, organ pipe and agria cacti, respectively. (E) Comparisons of electrophysiological responses between lines within a D. mojavensis population. (F) Behavioral responses to the synthetic mixture. (G) Behavioral respo...
Data
Principal component values for volatile compounds in the four host cacti. Eigenvectors with highest scores are indicated in bold. The compounds which were present only once across all four cacti were excluded from the PCA. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Finding appropriate feeding and breeding sites is crucial for all insects. To fulfil this vital task, many insects rely on their sense of smell. Alterations in the habitat-or in lifestyle-should accordingly also be reflected in the olfactory system. Solid functional evidence for direct adaptations in the olfactory system is however scarce. We have,...
Article
Full-text available
Flies, like all animals, need to find suitable and safe food. Because the principal food source for Drosophila melanogaster is yeast growing on fermenting fruit, flies need to distinguish fruit with safe yeast from yeast covered with toxic microbes. We identify a functionally segregated olfactory circuit in flies that is activated exclusively by ge...
Article
Full-text available
Bracon hebetor is a larval ectoparasitoid that utilizes several pests belonging to the family Pyralidae (Lepidoptera) as hosts. In the present study, we analyzed the kairomonal response of this wasp to the male-produced sex pheromone of a host, the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella, an economically important pest of honeybees, Apis mellifera. Co...
Article
The external morphology of the antennal sensilla of Pteromalus puparum females (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is described using scanning electron microscopy. The antennae of P. puparum females are geniculate in shape, formed from a large, cylindrical scape with a basal radicel fitting into the antennal socket, a shorter, barrel-shaped pedicel and a f...