Hans Vester

Hans Vester
bonhoeffer college, Enschede

Dr Ir

About

12
Publications
17,691
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1,554
Citations
Introduction
Hans Vester currently works at bonhoeffer college, Enschede. Hans does research in Forestry, Systematics (Taxonomy) and Ecology. Their current project is '2ndFOR (Secondary Forests)'.
Additional affiliations
October 1997 - August 2010
El Colegio de la Frontera Sur
Position
  • investigador titular
Description
  • projects on biodiversity effects of lands change, sustainable forestry, botany

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Tropical forests are converted at an alarming rate for agricultural use and pastureland, but also regrow naturally through secondary succession. For successful forest restoration, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of secondary succession. These mechanisms may vary across forest types, but analyses across broad spatial scales are lacking....
Article
Full-text available
Old-growth tropical forests harbor an immense diversity of tree species but are rapidly being cleared, while secondary forests that regrow on abandoned agricultural lands increase in extent. We assess how tree species richness and composition recover during secondary succession across gradients in environmental conditions and anthropogenic disturba...
Article
Full-text available
The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of...
Article
Full-text available
Regrowth of tropical secondary forests following complete or nearly complete removal of forest vegetation actively stores carbon in aboveground biomass, partially counterbalancing carbon emissions from deforestation, forest degradation, burning of fossil fuels, and other anthropogenic sources. We estimate the age and spatial extent of lowland secon...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land...
Article
Full-text available
The question of whether commercial logging can be carried out in tropical forests without inflicting serious ecological damage has been one of the most contentious issues in tropical forest ecology. Some authors proclaim that management should be left to a minimum (Rice et al. 1997), while others argue that sustainable management systems are feasib...
Book
Full-text available
This collection of papers, essays, letters, poem and a song was the result of a spontaneous reaction to a letter we sent to a list of ex alumni, colleagues and friends of “our Prof” saying: "Dear friends, Prof. Roelof Oldeman will retire this year. During his 25 years of professorship (1977 in Montpellier; 1978-2002 in Wageningen), participation in...
Article
Four successional forests, the oldest 30 years old, and a mature forest on the low terrace of the Caqueta river (Colombian Amazonia), were analysed architecturally. The architecture of these secondary forests was largely determined by species of Vismia, Miconia and Inga reaching their maximal crown expansion during the first 30 years of secondary f...

Network

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
2ndFOR is a collaborative research network on secondary forests. It focuses on the ecology, dynamics, and biodiversity of secondary forests, and the ecosystem services they provide in human-modified tropical landscapes. 2ndFOR involves >70 researchers from >15 different countries working at >50 sites across Latin America.