Hans Lambers

Hans Lambers
University of Western Australia and China Agricultural University · School of Biological Sciences

PhD Univ. Groningen

About

762
Publications
409,161
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
42,002
Citations
Introduction
Following my PhD and postdoctoral work, I held the chair of Ecophysiology at Utrecht Univ., where I worked on the physiological basis of variation in plant growth rate. At UWA, I collaborate with several colleagues on P nutrition of crop plants and Australian species. My main international collaborators are at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology (Germany), the Univ. Campinas (Brazil), China Agricultural Univ. (China) and Univ. Liege (Belgium).
Additional affiliations
July 1998 - April 2020
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Professor Emeritus
Description
  • Head of School from 1 January 2002 till 31 December, 2012.
July 1985 - July 2001
Utrecht University
Position
  • Professor (Full)
July 1982 - July 1985
University of Groningen
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
April 1976 - April 1979
University of Groningen
Field of study
  • Plant Physiology
August 1974 - March 1976
University of Groningen
Field of study
  • Microbiology and Plant Physiology
August 1970 - August 1974
University of Groningen
Field of study
  • Biochemistry

Publications

Publications (762)
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen (N) tends to limit plant productivity on young soils; phosphorus (P) becomes increasingly limiting in ancient soils because it gradually disappears through leaching and erosion. Plant traits that are regarded as adaptations to N- and P-limited conditions include mycorrhizas and cluster roots. Mycorrhizas 'scavenge' P from solution or 'mine...
Article
Full-text available
Plant species diversity increases as soil phosphorus availability declines during long-term ecosystem development(1,2). The increase in plant species diversity is associated with a decline in above-ground functional diversity, because leaf traits converge on a high phosphorus-use efficiency strategy on old and infertile soils(3,4). In contrast, the...
Article
Full-text available
Plant diversity in experimental systems often enhances ecosystem productivity, but the mechanisms causing this overyielding are only partly understood. Intercropping faba beans (Vicia faba L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) result in overyielding and also, enhanced nodulation by faba beans. By using permeable and impermeable root barriers in a 2-y field e...
Article
Full-text available
The biogeochemical silicon cycle influences global primary productivity and carbon cycling, yet changes in silicon sources and cycling during long-term development of terrestrial ecosystems remain poorly understood. Here, we show that terrestrial silicon cycling shifts from pedological to biological control during long-term ecosystem development al...
Article
Full-text available
Plants that deploy a phosphorus (P)-mobilising strategy based on the release of carboxylates tend to have high leaf manganese concentrations ([Mn]). This occurs be-cause the carboxylates mobilise not only soil inorganic and organic P, but also a range of micronutrients, includ-ing Mn. Concentrations of most other micronutrients increase to a small...
Article
Full-text available
Positive biodiversity‐productivity relationships have been found in biodiversity field experiments of grasslands, forests, and natural terrestrial ecosystems, where diversity effects were separated by complementarity (CE) and selection effects (SE). However, we know little about how CE and SE are related to root traits and root dissimilarity. A fou...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims Crop diversity has been repeatedly shown to support multiple ecosystem functions, both directly and indirectly, driven by interspecific root-root interactions. Despite continuous advances in this field, some research gaps remain, and we need to pay more attention to the design and management of multi-species and multi-cultivar s...
Article
Full-text available
Tremendous progress has been made on molecular aspects of plant phosphorus (P) nutrition, often without heeding information provided by soil scientists, ecophysiologists, and crop physiologists. This review suggests ways to integrate information from different disciplines. When soil P availability is very low, P-mobilizing strategies are more effec...
Article
Full-text available
Aims South-western Australia has some of the most phosphorus (P)-impoverished soils in the world. Hakea prostrata (Proteaceae) has nitrate (NO 3 ⁻ )-uptake restraint, associated with its high P-use efficiency. This research explores how common this trait is in other Proteaceae and in co-occurring plant species in south-western Australia. Methods B...
Article
Full-text available
Background Unveiling the diversity of plant strategies to acquire and use phosphorus (P) is crucial to understand factors promoting their coexistence in hyperdiverse P-impoverished communities within fire-prone landscapes such as in cerrado (South America), fynbos (South Africa) and kwongan (Australia). Scope We explore the diversity of P-acquisit...
Article
Full-text available
Plant roots and associated mycorrhizae exert a large influence on soil carbon (C) cycling. Yet, little was known whether and how roots and ectomycorrhizal extraradical mycelia differentially contribute to soil organic C (SOC) accumulation in alpine forests under increasing nitrogen (N) deposition. Using ingrowth cores, the relative contributions of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Leeuwin Group considers that the threatened biodiversity hotspot in southwest Western Australia requires special protection from frequent fire and has the following recommendations: • Abandon the 110,000 ha per year target of prescribed burning in Land Management Zone 3 (LMZ3) but retain existing targets in Land Management Zones 1 and 2. The 11...
Article
Full-text available
Around 40% of the original Brazilian savannah territory is occupied by pastures dominated by fast‐growing exotic C4 grasses, which impact ecosystem nutrient cycling. The restoration of these areas depends on the re‐establishment of soil processes. We assessed how restoration of abandoned pastures through direct seeding of native species and land‐ma...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Plant fine roots play an important role in forest nutrient cycling. However, how fine root decomposition responds to plant removal is poorly understood. We aimed to examine the effects of understory plants and overstory trees removal on fine root decomposition in 8- and 29-year-old (young and mature, respectively) Eucalyptus urophylla plantati...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims Waterlilies (Nymphaea spp) are ancient iconic plants. Scientific knowledge of their nutrient requirements is scarce. We investigated plant responses to phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) nutrition in a cultivar of tropical waterlilies used for commercial flower production. Methods Two studies with waterlilies were conducted simult...
Article
Tropical forest soils contribute to global warming and ozone depletion due to large nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. However, it is unknown whether the soil N2O fluxes will change under ongoing precipitation regime changes. In this study, two typical precipitation regimes were simulated in a tropical monsoon forest for seven years: delayed wet season...
Article
Full-text available
Terrestrial soils release large amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, which are mainly derived from litter and soil carbon (C) decomposition. Nutrient availability, especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), plays an important role in both litter and soil C decomposition. Therefore, understanding the underlying mechanism is crucial for mitigat...
Preprint
No studies have explored whether the invasive nature of Mikania micranatha and Chromolaena odorata is linked to their pattern of foliar phosphorus (P) investment in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and nitrogen (N) deposition at low soil P availability. Here, we address this by measuring foliar total N and P concentrations...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Precipitation patterns in the tropics of southern China are predicted to change with an increase of the rainfall in the wet season (WW) and a delay of the wet season into autumn (DW). To explore how soil C cycles respond to a changing precipitation pattern, we established a precipitation manipulation experiment through water exclusion or addit...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims The characterisation of plant-available phosphorus (P) pools and the assessment of the microbial community in the rhizosheath of cover crops can improve our understanding of plant–microbe interactions and P availability. Methods Mustard (Sinapis alba), phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia) and buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) were...
Article
Full-text available
Phosphorus (P) limitation is a significant factor restricting crop production in agricultural systems, and enhancing the internal P-utilization efficiency (PUE) of crops plays an important role in ensuring sustainable P use in agriculture. To better understand how P is remobilized to affect crop growth, we first screened P-efficient (B73 and GEMS50...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: Many terrestrial orchids have an obligate dependence on their mycorrhizal associations for nutrient acquisition, particularly during germination and early seedling growth. Though important in plant growth and development, phosphorus (P) nutrition studies in mixotrophic orchids have been limited to only a few orchid species and...
Article
Soil property impacts the efficacy of rhizobial inoculation and rhizosphere processes. However, very few comparative studies have been done to analyze the effects of rhizobial inoculants on plant nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in different soils. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to evaluate N fixation and P acquisition of inoculated so...
Article
Full-text available
Belowground plant traits play important roles in plant diversity loss driven by atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition. However, the way N enrichment shapes plant microhabitats by patterning belowground traits and finally determines aboveground responses is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the rhizosheath trait of 74 plant species in seven N‐a...
Preprint
Background and aims The positive effects of cereal-legume intercropping can occur through complementarity and facilitation for the acquisition of soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). However, the magnitude of the benefits depends on the availability of such resources. To improve our understanding and design best-performing systems, we evaluated th...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims Root residues are an important factor influencing soil phosphorus (P) availability for crop uptake, but how the residues from different species combinations in sole cropping or intercropping systems affect soil P pools remains unclear. Methods Maize and faba bean were planted as either sole crops or intercrops in a P-deficient...
Article
Full-text available
Irrigation has become one of the main approaches to improve agricultural production in the arid area. The variation of soil moisture after irrigation has the potential to affect soil microbial community composition and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage, thus, the imbalances in the terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle. However, the impact of long-term...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Phosphorus (P) and iron (Fe) are limiting nutrients in many (agro-)ecosystems. Due to P-sorption under most soil conditions, the current P-fertilization practices are inefficient, since large quantities of the P fertilizer applied remain in the soil as a residual part. Therefore, the development of sustainable agricultural practices urgently needs...
Article
Full-text available
Tremendous progress has been made on molecular aspects of plant phosphorus (P) nutrition, often without heeding information provided by soil scientists , ecophysiologists, and crop physiologists. This review suggests ways to integrate information from different disciplines. When soil P availability is very low, P-mobilizing strategies are more effe...
Article
Intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) is a key physiological trait; however, the spatiotemporal variation in iWUE and which factors affect iWUE in the tropics and subtropics are poorly known. We determined the temporal (1920-2010) and spatial patterns of iWUE using leaf carbon-isotopic composition (δ¹³C) of 1,811 herbarium specimens and associated...
Article
Full-text available
PurposeSilicon (Si) is a beneficial element for plants and plays important roles in the biogeochemical cycle of mineral elements. Yet, few studies have focused on the impact of nitrogen (N) deposition on plant Si uptake and the Si biocycle.Methods We designed an experiment investigating canopy and understory N addition in a tropical forest to compr...
Article
It has been demonstrated that intercropped crops may benefit from inoculation with rhizobia or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in soybean/maize intercropping systems under sterilized conditions. Little is known about the relative contribution of indigenous and introduced AM fungi and rhizobia to nutrient acquisition of intercropped soybean and ma...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies demonstrate a strong influence of soil age on long-term silicon (Si) dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems, but how variation in ecosystem water balance and soil parent material impact this trajectory is unknown. We addressed this by studying a 2-million-year dune chronosequence in southwestern Australia characterized by a positive wate...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Carboxylate release by roots has been considered a strategy for mobilisation and acquisition of phosphorus (P). However, recently, it was argued that carboxylate release may be a way to discharge surplus carbon produced under conditions that limit plant growth. Plant P status may not be the main factor driving carboxylate release by roots. Ins...
Article
Full-text available
Phosphorus (P) is essential for productivity of alpine grassland ecosystems, which are sensitive to global warming. We tested the hypotheses that (1) mobilized 'calcium-bound inorganic P' (Ca-Pi ) is a major source of plant-available P in alpine meadows with alkaline soils after long-term warming, (2) mobilization of Ca-Pi is linked to effective pl...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of a root economics space (RES) is increasingly adopted to explore root trait variation and belowground resource-acquisition strategies. Much progress has been made on interactions of root morphology and mycorrhizal symbioses. However, root exudation, with a significant carbon cost (~5-21% of total photosynthetically fixed carbon) to en...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Organic substances in leaves of several southwest Australian native species interfere with sensitive colorimetric assays and prevent quantification of inorganic phosphate concentration ([Pi]). We aimed to develop a reproducible routine procedure for treating leaf extracts with activated charcoal (AC) to remove interfering substances, allowing t...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Phosphorus (P) fertilizers are often considered an important source of cadmium (Cd) in crop plants. However, increased plant Cd concentrations are not strictly related to the Cd content of P fertilizers. Considering this, we hypothesized that, alternatively, reduction of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization by P fertilization enhances Cd accumu...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Aims Initiation of cluster roots in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) under phosphorus (P) deficiency requires auxin signaling, whereas flavonoids inhibit auxin transport. However, little information is available about the interactions between P deficiency and flavonoids in terms of cluster-root formation in white lupin. Methods Hydrop...
Article
Full-text available
The campos rupestres (rocky grassland) comprise an old-growth seasonally dry herbaceous ecosystem on mountaintops in central and eastern Brazil and in disjoint areas with sparse shrubs with high plant diversity and endemism. This ecosystem consists of sharp-edged quartzite landforms and rocky hillslopes with boulders, blocks, and sparse soil cover....
Article
Full-text available
In the context of a recent massive increase of research on plant root functions and their impact on the environment, root ecologists currently face many important challenges to keep on generating cutting edge, meaningful and integrated knowledge. Consideration of the belowground components in plant and ecosystem studies has been consistently called...
Article
Full-text available
Chilling restrains the distribution of mangroves. We tested whether foliar phosphorus (P) fractions and gene expression are associated with cold tolerance in mangrove species. ●We exposed seedlings of six mangrove populations from different latitudes to favorable, chilling and recovery treatments, and measured their foliar P concentrations and frac...
Article
Full-text available
We introduce the AusTraits database - a compilation of values of plant traits for taxa in the Australian flora (hereafter AusTraits). AusTraits synthesises data on 448 traits across 28,640 taxa from field campaigns, published literature, taxonomic monographs, and individual taxon descriptions. Traits vary in scope from physiological measures of per...
Article
Full-text available
Low availability of phosphorus (P) is a key limiting factor for the growth of many crops. Selenium (Se) is a nutrient for humans that is acquired predominantly from plants. Localised P and Se supply may affect P- and Se-uptake efficiency. Our aim was to examine the mechanisms of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) to acquire P and Se when the elements are...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Aims Soil phosphorus (P) deficiency and salinity are constraints to crop productivity in arid and semiarid regions. Salinity may weaken the effect of P fertilization on plant growth. We investigated the interactive effects of soil P availability and salinity on plant growth, P nutrition, and salt tolerance of two alfalfa cultivars....
Article
Full-text available
Changes in soil nutrient availability and primary succession of vegetation often co-occur during the processes of natural soil development. A low availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) resources is common in the very early and late stage of soil development, respectively. Plants have evolved different nutrient-acquisition strategies (NASs)...
Article
Full-text available
Phosphorus (P) is very likely the most frequently misspelled nutrient in scientific literature (Lambers & Plaxton, 2015). Plant science, soil science and ecology journals often misspell the term as phosphorous. This error is not picked up by spell‐checking software because phosphorous is a valid word. ‘Phosphorous’ is not an alternative spelling fo...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive plants rapidly spread in habitats with low soil phosphorus (P) availability and have triggered a sharp decline in the diversity of native species. However, no studies have explored how widespread invasive species acclimate to low soil P availability via changing foliar P fractions, especially under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (...
Article
Development of soil microbial communities is driven by local abiotic and biotic conditions, yet our current understanding of their ecology is limited to studies in modified or young and relatively fertile ecosystems. In nutrient-impoverished soils, microbial communities may be predominantly structured by availability of key elements such as phospho...
Article
Full-text available
The sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) in terrestrial ecosystems is determined by the balance between plant- and microbial-derived carbon inputs and losses through soil respiration. However, a consensus on the elevational patterns of soil microbial necromass and its contribution to SOC is rare, and the information on how climatic and edaphi...
Article
Full-text available
Aims:Plants deploying a phosphorus (P)-mobilising strategy via carboxylate release have relatively high leaf manganese concentrations ([Mn]). Thus, leaf [Mn] is a proxy for the amount of rhizosheath carboxylates. Whether the concentrations of other leaf micronutrient, such as iron ([Fe]), zinc ([Zn]) and copper ([Cu]), show a similar signal for rhi...
Article
High biodiversity increases ecosystem functions; however, belowground facilitation remains poorly understood in this context. Here, we explore mechanisms that operate via ‘giving–receiving feedbacks’ for belowground facilitation. These include direct effects via root exudates, signals, and root trait plasticity, and indirect biotic facilitation via...
Article
Full-text available
1.Mineral nutrients play a pivotal role in plant growth, development, and reproduction. The uptake and distribution of nutrients are generally limited by soil nutrient availability, affected by global change. However, responses of foliar mineral nutrient concentrations to changes in soil nutrient availability remain largely untested in tropical for...