Hannu Ylönen

Hannu Ylönen
Professor,University of Jyväskylä

PhD

About

160
Publications
27,570
Reads
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4,520
Citations
Citations since 2016
27 Research Items
1502 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Introduction
Additional affiliations
January 1990 - present
University of Jyväskylä
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (160)
Article
Full-text available
Prey animals can assess the risks predators present in different ways. For example, direct cues produced by predators can be used, but also signals produced by prey conspecifics that have engaged in non-lethal predator-prey interactions. These non-lethal interactions can thereby affect the physiology, behavior, and survival of prey individuals, and...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical communication plays an important role in mammalian life history decisions. Animals send and receive information based on body odour secretions. Odour cues provide important social information on identity, kinship, sex, group membership or genetic quality. Recent findings show, that rodents alarm their conspecifics with danger-dependent bod...
Article
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Most small rodent populations in the world have fascinating population dynamics. In the northern hemisphere, voles and lemmings tend to show population cycles with regular fluctuations in numbers. In the southern hemisphere, small rodents tend to have large amplitude outbreaks with less regular intervals. In the light of vast research and debate ov...
Article
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Authors would like to correct error in affiliation in the original publication of the article.
Article
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In 2015 a long-term, nationwide tick and tick-borne pathogen (TBP) monitoring project was started by the Finnish Tick Project and the Finnish Research Station network (RESTAT), with the goal of producing temporally and geographically extensive data regarding exophilic ticks in Finland. In the current study, we present results from the first four ye...
Article
Full-text available
Parental care often produces a trade-off between meeting nutritional demands of offspring and the duties of offspring protection, especially in altricial species. Parents have to leave their young unattended for foraging trips, during which nestlings are exposed to predators. We investigated how rodent mothers of altricial young respond to risk of...
Article
Full-text available
In the predator–prey arms race, survival-enhancing adaptive behaviors are essential. Prey can perceive predator presence directly from visual, auditory, or chemical cues. Non-lethal encounters with a predator may trigger prey to produce special body odors, alarm pheromones, informing conspecifics about predation risks. Recent studies suggest that p...
Article
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Living in northern latitudes poses challenges to the animals that live in those habitats. The harsh environment provides a short breeding season where the sunlit summer nights provide little reprieve from visibility to predators and increased risk. In this paper, we tested the activity and food choice patterns of bank voles Myodes glareolus in earl...
Article
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Risk recognition by prey is of paramount importance within the evolutionary arms race between predator and prey. Prey species are able to detect direct predator cues like odors and adjust their behavior appropriately. The question arises whether an indirect predation cue, such as the odor of scared individuals, can be detected by conspecifics and s...
Article
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Phenotype and life history traits of an individual are a product of environmental conditions and the genome. Environment can be current or past, which complicates the distinction between environmental and heritable effects on the phenotype in wild animals. We studied genome–environment interactions on phenotype and life history traits by transplant...
Article
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Climate change, habitat loss and fragmentation are major threats for populations and challenge for individual behavior, interactions, and survival. Predator‐prey interactions are modified by climate processes. In the northern latitudes strong seasonality is changing and the main predicted feature is shortening and instability of winter. Vole popula...
Article
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Background: Breeding site choice constitutes an important part of the species niche. Nest predation affects breeding site choice, and has been suggested to drive niche segregation and local coexistence of species. Interspecific social information use may, in turn, result in copying or rejection of heterospecific niche characteristics and thus affec...
Article
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Prey strategically respond to the risk of predation by varying their behavior while balancing the tradeoffs of food and safety. We present here an experiment that tests the way the same indirect cues of predation risk are interpreted by bank voles, Myodes glareolus, as the game changes through exposure to a caged weasel. Using optimal patch use, we...
Poster
Full-text available
In the evolutionary arms race between prey and predator, early risk recognition by the prey species is of paramount importance. Mammalian prey species are able to detect direct predator cues, like odors and to display appropriate defensive behaviors. Not much is known about indirect predation cues in mammals, i.e. the scent of scared individuals de...
Article
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Pregnancy termination after encountering a strange male, the Bruce effect, is regarded as a counterstrategy of female mammals towards anticipated infanticide. While confirmed in caged rodent pairs, no verification for the Bruce effect existed from experimental field populations of small rodents. We suggest that the effect may be adaptive for breedi...
Article
The bank vole is a commonly used model species in behavioral and ecophysiological studies. Thus, presenting a validated method for noninvasive monitoring of corticosterone and testosterone secretion is of high relevance. Here, we evaluated the effect of time of day and an ACTH challenge test on measured fecal corticosterone (FCM) and testosterone (...
Article
Infanticide, the killing of conspecific young, occurs in most mammal species, like in our study species, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). Infanticide by adult males is regarded as a strong factor affecting recruitment of young into population. It is considered as an adaptive behaviour, which may increase male fitness via resource gain or an increa...
Article
Predation can regulate populations and strongly affect invasion success of novel prey. The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi; Linnaeus 1758) is an invasive ectoparasite of cervids that spends a long period of its life cycle outside the host. Prior to this study, virtually nothing was known about natural summer time predation on the deer ked. We aimed to ev...
Article
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Due to global climate change, the winter conditions in the North are predicted to change, as the time with an intact insulating snow cover gets shorter or disappears altogether. For small mammals, this could cause exposure to strong temperature fluctuations and increased predation risk, inducing severe stress and leading to alterations in the physi...
Article
Mating with close kin may cause inbreeding depression with negative consequences to offspring and local populations. There exist mechanisms like kin-recognition or sex-specific dispersal to avoid mating with kin. In fluctuating population densities, like in many small mammals, both very low and very high densities provide conditions for inbreeding,...
Article
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Abiotic and biotic factors determine success or failure of individual organisms, populations and species. The early life stages are often the most vulnerable to heavy mortality due to environmental conditions. The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi Linnaeus, 1758) is an invasive insect ectoparasite of cervids that spends an important period of the life cycl...
Article
Full-text available
Parental care often produces a trade-off between meeting nutritional demands of offspring and the duties of offspring protection, especially in altricial species. Parents have to leave their young unattended for foraging trips, during which nestlings are exposed to predators. We investigated how rodent mothers of altricial young respond to risk of...
Article
Full-text available
In seasonal environments, the optimal onset of reproduction plays a major role in defining the reproductive success of an individual. Environmental cues, like day length, weather conditions, and food, regulate the initiation and termination of the breeding season. Besides the interspecific variation in response to environmental cues, it has been su...
Article
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Habitat fragmentation affects individual movements between favorable resource patches. In many small mammal species, an important intrinsic factor affecting recruitment of young is infanticide, committed especially by males. We predict that habitat fragmentation hinders movements of males between patches due to predation risk in the open areas. Thu...
Article
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SUMMARY The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) is a haematophagous ectoparasite of cervids that harbours haemotrophic Bartonella. A prerequisite for the vector competence of the deer ked is the vertical transmission of the pathogen from the mother to its progeny and transstadial transmission from pupa to winged adult. We screened 1154 pupae and 59 pools of...
Article
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Blood-sucking ectoparasites have often a strong impact on the behaviour of their hosts. The annual insect harassment of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) has increased in the southern part of the Finnish reindeer herding area because of the recent invasion of a blood-feeding ectoparasitic louse-fly, the deer ked (Lipoptena cervi). We studied th...
Article
In seasonal environments, the optimal onset of reproduction plays a major role in defining the reproductive success of an individual. Environmental cues, like day length, weather conditions, and food, regulate the initiation and termination of the breeding season. Besides the interspecific variation in response to environmental cues, it has been su...
Article
Some of the genetic benefit hypotheses put forward to explain multiple male mating (polyandry) predict that sons of polyandrous females will have an increased competitive ability under precopulatory or post-copulatory competition via paternally inherited traits, such as attractiveness or fertilization efficiency. Here, we tested these predictions b...
Article
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In the ongoing evolutionary arms race between predators and their prey, successful escape from the predator leads to the evolution of improved escape tactics in prey, but also predators become more effective in following and attacking the prey. Antipredatory behavior of prey is considered to be the strongest towards their most dangerous predators....
Article
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The relationship between predators and prey is thought to change due to habitat loss and fragmentation, but patterns regarding the direction of the effect are lacking. The common prediction is that specialized predators, often more dependent on a certain habitat type, should be more vulnerable to habitat loss compared to generalist predators, but a...
Article
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Climate instability strongly affects overwintering conditions in organisms living in a strongly seasonal environment and consequently their survival and population dynamics. Food, predation and density effects are also strong during winter, but the effect of fragmentation of ground vegetation on ground-dwelling small mammals is unknown. Here, we re...
Article
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Predation is often considered an important factor for population regulation and in some cases for the invasion success of prey. Small mammalian predation may be a major force in the population regulation of many ground-dwelling invertebrate species. The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi (L., 1758)) is an ectoparasitic fly of cervids. The species has a larg...
Article
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Context. Life-history strategies are the means that organisms use to achieve successful reproduction in environments that vary in time and space. Individual animals maximise life-time reproductive success (LRS) through optimal timing of reproduction and investment in offspring. A crucial factor affecting LRS is predation risk in a highly seasonal e...
Article
1. In seasonal environments, optimal onset of breeding and survival plays major roles in individual fitness. Many physiological and behavioural factors related to breeding increase the risk of predation; thus, breeding decisions should be based on current risks and benefits. According to life-history theory, if current predation risk is high and br...
Article
The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) is an ectoparasitic fly on cervids that has expanded its distribution rapidly in Northern Europe. However, the regulating biotic factors such as predation remain unknown. The host-independent pupal stage of the fly lasts for several months. Blackish pupae are visible against snow, especially on the bedding sites of ho...
Article
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Investigating patterns of variation in mating strategies may shed light on their evolutionary importance as well as their impact on the strength and shape of sexual selection. Multimale mating (polyandry) and mate choice are intensely studied subjects in the area of sexual selection, but little is known about intraspecific patterns of variation tha...
Article
One major intrinsic factor affecting recruitment of young into a population is infanticide, the killing of conspecific young by adult males. It occurs in most mammal species, like our study species the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), and is widely accepted as an adaptive behavior, which may increase male fitness via nutritional gain, decreased compet...
Article
Full-text available
Indirect exploitative competition, direct interference and predation are important interactions affecting species coexistence. These interaction types may overlap and vary with the season and life-history state of individuals. We studied effects of competition and potential nest predation by common shrews (Sorex araneus) on lactating bank voles (My...
Article
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A territory as a prerequisite for breeding limits the maximum number of breeders in a given area, and thus lowers the proportion of breeders if population size increases. However, some territorially breeding animals can have dramatic density fluctuations and little is known about the change from density-dependent processes to density-independence o...
Article
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Indirect resource competition and interference are widely occurring mechanisms of interspecific interactions. We have studied the seasonal expression of these two interaction types within a two-species, boreal small mammal system. Seasons differ by resource availability, individual breeding state and intraspecific social system. Live-trapping metho...
Article
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Invasive generalist ectoparasites provide a tool to study factors affecting expansion rates. An increase in the number of host species may facilitate geographic range expansion by increasing the number of suitable habitats and by affecting local extinction and colonization rates. A geographic perspective on parasite host specificity and its implica...
Article
The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) is a haematophagous parasitic fly of cervids that spread to Finland in the early 1960's. Presently its northern distribution limit lies at approximately 65°N and it is gradually spreading northwards. In Finland the principal host species has been the moose (Alces alces), but the deer ked is about to establish contact...
Article
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We studied factors causing variation in the initiation of reproduction after winter in the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus), an iteroparous seasonal breeder, by offering different winter food supplements and monitoring local density variation. We used either sunflower seeds or barley to supplement the diet of populations of bank voles in grassla...
Article
The range expansion of organisms towards higher latitudes and altitudes is often limited by colder temperatures and the shorter growth season. In parasites, survival outside the host is most likely to affect their potential establishment in novel environments. We conducted a large scale transplant experiment to predict the potential spread of the d...
Article
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Personality means an individual's unique way of behaving and reacting to the environment. It is a stable and heritable trait, which is expressed consistently in different situations. The aim of our study was to develop novel tests to depict the personality structure of the bank vole Myodes glareolus, and to determine if the phase of the population...
Article
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The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) is a common ectoparasite of cervids. During the last decades the species has rapidly invaded in northern Europe, especially in Finland, towards the north and increased its prevalence on the moose population. Consequently, during this rapid invasion the deer ked has faced more severe climatic conditions. We studied whe...
Article
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Plant-associated micro-organisms such as mycotoxin-producing endophytes commonly have direct negative effects on herbivores. These effects may be carried over to natural enemies of the herbivores, but this has been rarely explored. We examined how feeding on Neotyphodium endophyte infected (E+) and endophyte free (E-) meadow ryegrass (Scherodonus p...
Article
Infanticide, the killing of conspecific young, is commonly recognized as an adaptive behavioural strategy enhancing the fitness of the perpetrator. Infanticide is supposed to be inhibited in several male rodent species after mating with a time lag to the time when perpetrators own offspring would be born. This is because males with no parental care...
Article
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Habitat fragmentation causes negative population trends or even local extinction in many species. Understanding the role of fragmentation on behavior and space use of animals is an essential part of revealing the mechanism behind observed population declines. We studied experimentally the effects of small-scale habitat fragmentation on the distribu...
Article
Infanticide — the killing of conspecific young — is a common phenomenon in many invertebrate and vertebrate species, particularly common in rodents. It can increase juvenile mortality and, thus, affect population growth. Male infanticide is explained by adaptive hypotheses based on sexual selection. Removing future competitors for mating opportunit...
Article
Full-text available
The deer ked [Lipoptena cervi (L. 1758) (Dipt., Hippoboscidae)] is a blood-sucking ectoparasite of cervids. The species has been resident in Sweden for more than two centuries, whereas in Finland ( approximately 50 years) and Norway ( approximately 30 years), it has established itself relatively recently. L. cervi may cause serious health problems...
Article
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Range expansion of ectoparasites can cause parasites to attack new host species. In these cases it is important for the parasite to be able to adapt to the new environment and to reproduce on the host. For the host, it is crucial to hinder successfully the development of long-lasting parasitic relationship. The deer ked ( Lipoptena cervi) is a nove...
Article
Full-text available
A predator has a large impact on its prey. Besides a direct lethal effect, mere predator presence can increase stress and vigilance reflecting on prey behaviour and physiology. Such an effect should be stronger in more vulnerable prey individuals, depending e.g. on sex and reproductive status. We studied the short-term physiological response, the c...