Hannes Laermanns

Hannes Laermanns
University of Cologne | UOC · Institute of Geography

PhD - Dr. rer. nat.

About

17
Publications
4,095
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90
Citations
Citations since 2016
16 Research Items
90 Citations
201620172018201920202021202205101520253035
201620172018201920202021202205101520253035
201620172018201920202021202205101520253035
201620172018201920202021202205101520253035

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Lacustrine sediments are important archives for high resolution palaeoenvironmental reconstructions of the Holocene. Despite the density of ancient cities and settlements along the western coast of Turkey, the archives from coastal lakes in this area have until now not been recognized to their fullest potential and are, therefore, only poorly studi...
Article
The Santo André lagoon is located on the southern west coast of Portugal, about 80 km south of Lisbon. Although the beach barrier separating the lagoon from the open sea was occasionally breached in the past and has artificially been opened on an annual basis for the last decades, the lagoon still represents an appropriate geo-bio-archive for recon...
Article
Full-text available
Occurrence and distribution of microplastics in different ecosystems have recently become subjects of numerous studies. However, to date the research has focused mainly on marine and freshwater ecosystems and widely neglected terrestrial environments. Only recently, first studies investigated the microplastics contamination of soils. Therefore, we...
Article
Full-text available
Accumulation of microplastics in aquatic environments is an issue of emerging concern. Initially, research focused on marine systems. However, recent studies also investigate the abundance of microplastics in freshwater environments. Rivers connect terrestrial with marine ecosystems and contribute a considerable share of macro- and microplastics to...
Article
Full-text available
Rivers are major pathways for the transport of microplastics towards the oceans, and many studies focus on microplastic abundance in fluvial ecosystems. Although flooding strongly affects transport of microplastics, knowledge about the potential input via floodwaters, spatial distribution, and fate of microplastics in adjacent floodplains remains v...
Article
Full-text available
In the southernmost part of the Colchian plain (Georgia), the Supsa and Rioni rivers represent important catchments for reconstructing Holocene landscape changes. Using granulometric methods, geochemical analyses and radiocarbon dating, we demonstrate that significant palaeoenvironmental changes have taken place in the surroundings of the Supsa fan...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During the past seven millennia, huge environmental changes have occurred in the environs of the (later) city of Ephesos (W Turkey) due to the delta progradation of the Küçük Menderes and its tributaries within an extended former marine embayment. In addition, an ever increasing human influence on the landscape (settlements, agriculture, herding) h...
Article
Abstract In 1755 CE, a strong earthquake followed by a transatlantic tsunami destroyed large coastal areas; it also left its sedimentary imprints in the Boca do Rio valley (western Algarve, Portugal). This tsunami layer is very well preserved and has been analysed in several studies. Deposits of preceding extreme wave events, however, have rarely b...
Presentation
The structure of coastlines is of crucial importance for the existence of harbours. On the west coast of Turkey, numerous well-protected and deeply incised embayments provide ideal locations for harbours. When connected to their hinterlands via rivers, this made these locations even more attractive. A major drawback of such estuaries is however the...
Article
The cover image, by Hannes Laermanns et al., is based on the Research Article Bronze Age settlement mounds on the Colchian plain at the Black Sea coast of Georgia: A geoarchaeological perspective, DOI: 10.1002/gea.21670.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The backfill of the antique harbour of Ephesus is not only attributed to a natural siltation by sediments of the nearby river Kaystros, but also to the anthropogenic deposition of waste materials, which the city's inhabitants dumped into the harbour basin for half a millennium. Sediments of municipal waste water still contain relics of pathogens, i...
Article
Situated between the Enguri and Khobistskali rivers, more than 30 settlement mounds (locally named Dikhagudzuba) provide evidence for a relatively densely populated landscape in the coastal lowlands of western Georgia during the Bronze Age. Compared to older mounds in eastern Georgia and other regions, these mounds differ not only in age but also i...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Harbours located at estuaries and marine embayments face the constant threat of losing their function due to the accumulation of sediments from riverine input or longshore drift, thus requiring continuous efforts by the local population in order to maintain their function. Delta progradation of the ancient Kaystros (modern Küçük Menderes) which end...
Article
The Kolkheti lowlands (Colchis, Colchian plain) form the central part of the extensive coastal lowlands along the Black Sea coast of Georgia. Situated between the Greater and the Lesser Caucasus, favourable climatic conditions resulted in a constant human occupation of the region during the Holocene. However, due to continued deltaic sedimentation...
Article
During the past millennia, many erosion and accumulation processes have been modified by anthropogenic impact. This holds especially true for the environs of ancient settlements and their harbours along the Mediterranean coasts. Our multi-proxy investigations in the Roman harbour and the harbour canal of Ephesus (Western Turkey) reveals that humans...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During Antiquity, Ephesos was an important harbour city. About 7 millennia ago the maximum Holocene trans-gression reached c. 20 km inland. Due to the progradation of the Küçük Menderes delta and its tributaries the coastline has continuously shifted westwards since then. Especially during Hellenistic time, the delta advanced for about 1.5 km, most...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Microplastics are ubiquitous in the environment. However, we don't know much about their transport through environmental compartments. In this project, we analyse transport processes of microplastic particles as part of the larger research consortium CRC Microplastics (https://www.sfb-mikroplastik.uni-bayreuth.de/en/index.html).
Project
Although Otto Benndorf, the first excavation director of Ephesos, already recognized the importance of the natural landscape for the settlement activity of humans and as a result some geoarchaeological research was conducted in the vicinity of Ephesos, however, bio- and geoarchaeology were only included in the research program and systematically pursued over the course of the last five years. The basis for the interdisciplinary questions is shaped by a diachronic, holistic approach that reaches back to before the first settlement activity of humans in the Neolithic (8th/7th millennium BCE) to the modern period. At the center of the research is the reconstruction of historical human-environmental systems as well as questions regarding transaction and communication networks. Here, the classical studies-archaeological scholarship dovetails with the social and environmental sciences resulting in a heightened awareness for artifacts and especially biogenic residue. While recovery, documentation, and analysis of botanical macro-remains has been taking place consistently since the 2000s, now three cores from former lakes and the Roman harbor basin are available and permit an analysis of the pollen. Following 120 years of intense archaeological research for the first time it is now possible to write a history about the vegetation and landscape and also about agriculture in Ephesos on the basis of bioarchives. Already the first preliminary analyses have shown that the two cores in the hinterland of Ephesos cover a time period from the Neolithic to the Middle Ages. In addition to a characterization of the natural vegetation, the pollen profile clearly shows various human influences, such as the introduction of grazing and farming in prehistory, the cultivation and use of the olive, but also the massive changes and ecological consequences of Roman agriculture. A third core taken in the harbor channel covers the time period from the 3rd/2nd century BCE to the late Byzantine period and features a markedly different composition. Here, anthropogenic components from the city dominate – for example through the waste water channels – and thus permit conclusions about the diet and, therefore, also about the eating habits and the health of the population. As part of the research on Ephesos, the proposed project is charting new ground. For the first time it will be possible to reconstruct the vegetation and landscape history not only on the basis of historical and archaeological sources but within the framework of interdisciplinary questions and by applying state-of-the-art methods. The comparison of the profiles from the residual lakes/marshes with those from the harbor basin of Ephesos offer the unique opportunity of contrasting a quasi-natural vegetation with an environment strongly influenced by humans. The project must also be viewed in a geographically broad context because only very few comparable pollen profiles are available from Asia Minor. This study will close a geographic gap between the pollen-carrying bio-archives in the northwest and those in the southwest of Turkey. In the region itself comparable material is only available from the Bafa Gölü.