Hanneke Van Lavieren

Hanneke Van Lavieren
World Wildlife Fund | WWF · Guianas Office Suriname

16.2
 · 
MSc. Marine Biology and Ecology

About

24
Publications
23,317
Reads
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670
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in developing and coordinating initiatives that promote integrated and ecosystem based, ridge-to-reef and effective marine conservation approaches linking sound science to the formulation of policy for improved coastal management, while focusing on capacity enhancement and community-based conservation.
Research Experience
September 2006 - September 2014
United Nations University (UNU)
Position
  • Regional Coordinator Latin America and the Caribbean
May 2001 - September 2006
United Nations Environment Programme
Position
  • Programme Officer
April 1998 - May 2001
Ministerie van Buitenlandse Zaken, Nederlands
Position
  • Technical Advisor (Marine/Coastal)

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the population composition and dynamics of migratory megafauna at key developmental habitats is critical for conservation and management. The present study investigated whether differential recovery of Caribbean green turtle (Chelonia mydas) rookeries influenced population composition at a major juvenile feeding ground in the southern...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Guianas (French Guiana, Suriname and Guyana) is known for at least three species of nesting marine turtles namely the Green (Chelonia mydas), the leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and the Olive Ridley (Lepidochelys coriacea). The Hawksbill turtle are known to nest nesting beach in the Guianas, while the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta)...
Book
Full-text available
The Global Environment Facility is the largest financial institution with the ability and experience to confront the challenges facing shared marine and coastal ecosystems. Since its establishment in 1991, the GEF, through its International Waters focal area, has allocated a total of $1.14B in project grants to transboundary marine projects. with a...
Article
Full-text available
Oman contains diverse and abundant reef coral communities that extend along a coast that borders three environmentally distinct water bodies, with corals existing under unique and often stressful environmental conditions. In recent years Oman's reefs have undergone considerable change due to recurrent predatory starfish outbreaks, cyclone damage, h...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Mangroves are a type of tropical forest, uniquely positioned at the dynamic interface of land and sea. They are found along coasts and estuaries throughout the tropics and subtropics and are capable of thriving in salt water; prospering in conditions to which only a few species have adapted. Mangroves form the foundation of a highly productive and...
Article
Full-text available
The eight countries surrounding the Persian Gulf – Bahrain, Kuwait, Iran, Iraq, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates – share a valuable ecosystem that, like many other places in the world, is being seriously degraded by a human impacts. Since the oil boom of the 1970s there has been massive economic and population growth throughou...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Control of aquatic pollution is critical for improving coastal zone management and for the conservation of fisheries resources. Countries in the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR) generally lack monitoring capacity and do not have reliable information on the levels and distribution of pollutants, particularly chemical contaminants, and the ecological and...
Book
Full-text available
The eight countries surrounding the Gulf (referred to as both the Persian and Arabian Gulf) - Bahrain, Kuwait, Iran, Iraq, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates - share a valuable marine ecosystem that now risks becoming seriously degraded by a number of anthropogenic impacts. Some of the most rapidly developing countries in the w...
Article
Full-text available
Intensive land development as a result of the rapidly growing tourism industry in the "Riviera Maya" region of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico may result in contamination of groundwater resources that eventually discharge into Caribbean coastal ecosystems. We deployed two types of passive sampling devices into groundwater flowing through cave systems...
Article
Full-text available
The Persian Gulf is a semi-enclosed marine system surrounded by eight countries, many of which are experiencing substantial development. It is also a major center for the oil industry. The increasing array of anthropogenic disturbances may have substantial negative impacts on marine ecosystems, but this has received little attention until recently....
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides insights on the adoption or use of OpenCourseWare (OCW) to support broader research, training and institutional capacity development goals, based on the experience of the United Nations University. Specifically, it explains the strategic context for the use of OCW in the university through its related efforts in the area of Virt...
Article
Full-text available
Stresses associated with effects of climate change, including rise in relative mean sea level, present one set of threats to mangroves. Coastal development and ecosystems in the Pacific Islands region are particularly vulnerable to climate change effects. We investigated the capacity of Pacific Island countries and territories to assess mangrove vu...
Book
Full-text available
The report highlights UNEP’s activities in assisting Small Island Developing States in implementing the Barbados Programme of Action (BPoA), 1994, for the Sustainable Development of SIDS. As a group, SIDS share several characteristics, which make them economically, environmentally, and socially more vulnerable to factors of which they exercise litt...
Article
Full-text available
The Northern Sierra Madre Natural Park (NSMNP) is located in Luzon, Philippines and is one of the ten priority sites for biodiversity conservation in the Philippines. This paper gives an overview of the outcome of specific studies on the populations of sea turtles, fisheries, coral reefs, seagrass beds and cetaceans, and some constraints to communi...
Article
Full-text available
Yellow wrasses (Halichoeres chrysus) show clear daily activity patterns. The fish hide in the substrate at (subjective) night, during the distinct rest phase. Initial entrainment in a 12h:12h light-dark (12:12 LD) cycle (mean period 24.02h, SD 0.27h, n = 16) was followed by a free run (mean period 24.42h, SD 1.33h) after transition into constant di...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides insights on the adoption or use of open courseware (OCW) to support broader research, training and institutional capacity development goals, based on the experience of the United Nations University (UNU). Specifically, it explains the strategic context for the use of OCW in the university through its related efforts in the area...

Projects

Projects (9)
Archived project
Funded by The Waterloo Foundation and executed by the Inter-Villager Association of Dassilamé (AIV), the project launched in 2016, aims to strengthen the economic power of local communities by creating a small business on Oysetr farming in the Saloum Delta. There is great potential in the area for the sale of fresh oysters and they offer greater added value to the community. Therefore a survey of the oyster industry was conducted including relvant market and socio-economic information and a Business Plan was developed to promote the sector as a local enterprise to develop the area. https://africa.wetlands.org/en/news/senegal-sustainable-community-based-enterprise-promoting-oyster-farming-sine-saloum-delta-project-launched/
Project
EU Funded. The project aims to use a participatory approach to develop comprehensive and visually appealing spatial data that will fill critical information gaps, and facilitate informed decision-making regarding marine management and protection. This participatory approach to marine decision-making will increase the knowledge of the marine environment and related human uses of the marine environment among all participating stakeholders by allowing information to be available to everyone. Increased marine protection and strengthened governance through participatory spatial planning, targeted capacity building, and compelling data, will demonstrate that MSP can produce “win-win” outcomes that conserve biodiversity and enhance food security, protect livelihoods and support socio-economic development compatible with ocean health.