Hannah M Rowland

Hannah M Rowland
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology | ice · Predators and Prey Research Group

About

61
Publications
25,268
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1,736
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Introduction
Hannah M Rowland currently works at the Predators and Prey Research Group, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology. Hannah's research focuses on the evolutionary ecology of predator behaviour and prey defences
Additional affiliations
October 2010 - September 2011
University of Glasgow
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2007 - September 2010
University of Liverpool
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Hannah Rowland and colleagues introduce the peppered moth whose industrial melanism was an early evidence for evolution.
Article
Full-text available
In chickens, the sense of taste plays an important role in detecting nutrients and choosing feed. The molecular mechanisms underlying the taste-sensing system of chickens are well studied, but the neural mechanisms underlying taste reactivity have received less attention. Here we report the short-term taste behaviour of chickens towards umami and b...
Article
Full-text available
Orthopteran insects are characterized by high variability in body coloration, in particular featuring a widespread green-brown color polymorphism. The mechanisms that contribute to the maintenance of this apparently balanced polymorphism are not yet understood. To investigate whether morph-dependent microhabitat choice might contribute to the conti...
Article
Full-text available
Social information use is well documented across the animal kingdom, but how it influences ecological and evolutionary processes is only just beginning to be investigated. Here we evaluate how social transmission may influence species interactions and potentially change or create novel selection pressures by focusing on predator–prey interactions,...
Preprint
In a variety of aposematic species, the conspicuousness of an individual's warning signal and the quantity of its chemical defence are positively correlated. This apparent honest signalling in aposematism is predicted by resource competition models which assume that the production and maintenance of aposematic defences compete for access to antioxi...
Article
What causes an animal to resist trying new food or incorporating it into their diet? In this Quick guide, Heyworth et al. discuss the phenomenon known as dietary wariness.
Article
Full-text available
Social transmission of information is taxonomically widespread and could have profound effects on the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of animal communities. Demonstrating this in the wild, however, has been challenging. Here we show by field experiment that social transmission among predators can shape how selection acts on prey defences. Usin...
Preprint
Full-text available
A species' success during the invasion of new areas hinges on an interplay between demographic processes and the outcome of localized selection. Invasive European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) established populations in Australia and North America in the 19th century. Here, we compare whole-genome sequences among native and independently introduced...
Article
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Camouflage is the most common form of antipredator defense, and is a textbook example of natural selection. How animals’ appearances prevent detection or recognition is well studied, but the role of prey behavior has received much less attention. Here we report a series of experiments with twig-mimicking larvae of the American peppered moth Biston...
Article
Full-text available
To make adaptive foraging decisions, predators need to gather information about the profitability of prey. As well as learning from prey encounters, recent studies show that predators can learn about prey defences by observing the negative foraging experiences of conspecifics. However, predator communities are complex. While observing heterospecifi...
Article
Full-text available
Many prey species contain defensive chemicals that are described as tasting bitter. Bitter taste perception is, therefore, assumed to be important when predators are learning about prey defenses. However, it is not known how individuals differ in their response to bitter taste, and how this influences their foraging decisions. We conducted taste pe...
Article
Full-text available
Video playback provides a promising method to study social interactions, and the number of video playback experiments has been growing in recent years. Using videos has advantages over live individuals as it increases the repeatability of demonstrations, and enables researchers to manipulate the features of the presented stimulus. How observers res...
Article
Full-text available
Light sensing by tissues distinct from the eye occurs in diverse animal groups, enabling circadian control and phototactic behaviour. Extraocular photoreceptors may also facilitate rapid colour change in cephalopods and lizards, but little is known about the sensory system that mediates slow colour change in arthropods. We previously reported that...
Article
Full-text available
1.Aposematism is an effective antipredator strategy. However, the initial evolution and maintenance of aposematism is paradoxical because conspicuous prey are vulnerable to attack by naïve predators. Consequently, the evolution of aposematic signal mimicry is also difficult to explain. 2.The cost of conspicuousness can be reduced if predators learn...
Article
Full-text available
Camouflage, and in particular background-matching, is one of the most common anti-predator strategies observed in nature. Animals can improve their match to the colour/pattern of their surroundings through background selection, and/or by plastic colour change. Colour change can occur rapidly (a few seconds), or it may be slow, taking hours to days....
Article
Full-text available
In freshwater environments, chemosensory cues play an important role in predator-prey interactions. Prey use a variety of chemosensory cues to detect and avoid predators. However, whether predators use the chemical cues released by disturbed or stressed prey has received less attention. Here we tested the hypothesis that the disturbance cue cortiso...
Data
Full dataset used for analysis
Article
Full-text available
Coloration mediates the relationship between an organism and its environment in important ways, including social signaling, antipredator defenses, parasitic exploitation, thermoregulation, and protection from ultraviolet light, microbes, and abrasion. Methodological breakthroughs are accelerating knowledge of the processes underlying both the produ...
Article
Full-text available
The colour of our skin and clothing affects how others perceive us and how we behave. Human skin colour varies conspicuously with genetic ancestry, but even subtle changes in skin colour due to diet, blood oxygenation and hormone levels influence social perceptions. In this review, we describe the theoretical and empirical frameworks in which human...
Article
Full-text available
Video playback is becoming a common method for manipulating social stimuli in experiments. Parid tits are one of the most commonly studied groups of wild birds. However, it is not yet clear if tits respond to video playback or how their behavioural responses should be measured. Behaviours may also differ depending on what they observe demonstrators...
Data
Demonstrator encountering aversive prey The video shows a demonstrator encountering aversive prey (mealworm injected with bitter-tasting Bitrex).
Data
Results of the GLM models More comprehensive presentation of the results from all GLM models described in the results section.
Data
Observer?s response to video playback The video shows an observer?s response to different sections of video playback: (i) a control section (a cup in an empty cage) before a demonstrator (30 s), (ii) a demonstrator encountering aversive prey (45 s), and (iii) a control section (a cup in an empty cage) after a demonstrator (30 s).
Data
Demonstrator encountering palatable prey The video shows a demonstrator encountering palatable prey (mealworm).
Article
Full-text available
Video playback is becoming a common method for manipulating social stimuli in experiments. Parid tits are one of the most commonly studied groups of wild birds. However, it is not yet clear if tits respond to video playback or how their behavioural responses should be measured. Behaviours may also differ depending on what they observe demonstrators...
Article
Full-text available
We consider the problem of scale detection in images where a region of interest is present together with a measurement tool (e.g. a ruler). For the segmentation part, we focus on the graph based method by Flenner and Bertozzi which reinterprets classical continuous Ginzburg-Landau minimisation models in a totally discrete framework. To overcome the...
Article
Full-text available
Prey animals that possess chemical defences often advertise their unprofitability to predators by a distinctive and conspicuous visual appearance known as aposematism. However, not all chemically defended species are conspicuous, and some are nearly cryptic. Differences in predator community composition and predator behaviour may explain varied lev...
Article
Full-text available
Prey animals that possess chemical defences often advertise their unprofitability to predators by a distinctive and conspicuous visual appearance known as aposematism. However, not all chemically defended species are conspicuous, and some are nearly cryptic. Differences in predator community composition and predator behaviour may explain varied lev...
Article
Full-text available
Rabies is responsible for an estimated 59,000 human deaths worldwide and domestic dogs are the primary reservoir and vector of the disease. Among some nations widespread vaccination has led to elimination of rabies in domestic dogs, yet dogs are still susceptible to rabies infection from interactions with wildlife reservoirs. On Tribal lands in the...
Article
Full-text available
During early development, many aposematic species have bright and conspicuous warning appearance, but have yet to acquire chemical defenses, a phenotypic state which presumably makes them vulnerable to predation. Body size and signal luminance in particular are known to be sensitive to variation in early nutrition. However, the relative importance...
Article
Full-text available
Human ovulation is not advertised, as it is in several primate species, by conspicuous sexual swellings. However, there is increasing evidence that the attractiveness of women's body odor, voice, and facial appearance peak during the fertile phase of their ovulatory cycle. Cycle effects on facial attractiveness may be underpinned by changes in faci...
Article
Full-text available
Aposematic prey that possess chemical defenses advertise these to potential predators using conspicuous warning coloration. Aposematism is often associated with group living, which is hypothesized to enhance the protection of these species. Predators exhibit unlearned biases against foods with warning coloration, and the presentation of a novel sou...
Article
Full-text available
Aposematic prey that possess chemical defenses advertise these to potential predators using conspicuous warning coloration. Aposematism is often associated with group living, which is hypothesized to enhance the protection of these species. Predators exhibit unlearned biases against foods with warning coloration, and the presentation of a novel sou...
Article
Masquerading animals benefit from the difficulty that predators have in differentiating them from the inedible objects, such as twigs, that they resemble. The function of masquerade has been demonstrated, but how it interacts with the life history of organisms has not yet been studied. Here, we report the use of comparative analyses to test hypothe...
Article
Full-text available
1. Prey species often possess defences (e.g. toxins) coupled with warning signals (i.e. aposematism). There is growing evidence that the expression of aposematic signals often varies within species and correlates with the strength of chemical defences. This has led to the speculation that such signals may be ‘honest’, with signal reliability ensure...
Article
Full-text available
Müllerian mimicry describes the close resemblance between aposematic prey species; it is thought to be beneficial because sharing a warning signal decreases the mortality caused by sampling by inexperienced predators learning to avoid the signal. It has been hypothesized that selection for mimicry is strongest in multi-species prey communities wher...
Article
Full-text available
Predation is a fundamental process in the interaction between species, and exerts strong selection pressure. Hence, anti-predatory traits have been intensively studied. Although it has long been speculated that individuals of some species gain protection from predators by sometimes almost-uncanny resemblances to uninteresting objects in the local e...
Article
It has been evolved alike in many unrelated groups of animals by the hunter and the hunted; in the sea and on land. It tones the canvas on which are painted the Leopard's spots, the Tiger's stripes, and the patterns of smaller Carnivora such as Serval and Ocelot, Civet, and Genet, Jackal and Hyaena. It is the dress almost universally worn by rodent...
Article
Full-text available
Masquerading organisms appear to closely resemble inedible and generally inanimate objects, such as twigs, leaves, stones, and bird droppings. It has recently been demonstrated that masquerading prey gain protection from predation by being misclassified as inedible objects by their predators. Here, we present the first experimental test of the requ...
Article
Full-text available
Ecology Letters (2010) 13: 1494–1502 The nature of signal mimicry between defended prey (known as Müllerian mimicry) is controversial. Some authors assert that it is always mutualistic and beneficial, whilst others speculate that less well defended prey may be parasitic and degrade the protection of their better defended co-mimics (quasi-Batesian m...
Article
Full-text available
Müllerian mimicry, where 2 or more unrelated aposematic species resemble one another, is predicted to reduce the per capita mortality of co-mimics by allowing them to share the cost of educating naïve predators about their unpalatability. However, the specific assumptions and predictions of Müller's theory of shared resemblance have been previously...
Article
Full-text available
In 1879, Fritz Müller hypothesized that mimetic resemblance in which defended prey display the same warning signal would share the costs of predator education. Although Müller argued that predators would need to ingest a fixed number of prey with a given visual signal when learning to avoid unpalatable prey, this assumption lacks empirical support....
Article
Many organisms appear to mimic inanimate objects such as twigs, leaves, stones, and bird droppings. Such adaptations are considered to have evolved because their bearers are misidentified as either inedible objects by their predators, or as innocuous objects by their prey. In the past, this phenomenon has been classified by some as Batesian mimicry...
Article
Full-text available
Masquerade describes the resemblance of an organism to an inedible object and is hypothesized to facilitate misidentification of that organism by its predators or its prey. To date, there has been no empirical demonstration of the benefits of masquerade. Here, we show that two species of caterpillar obtain protection from an avian predator by being...
Article
Many organisms appear to mimic inanimate objects such as twigs, leaves, stones, and bird droppings. Such adaptations are considered to have evolved because their bearers are misidentified as either inedible objects by their predators, or as innocuous objects by their prey. In the past, this phenomenon has been classified by some as Batesian mimicry...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals are attuned to cues of quality in potential mates. Mate quality is assessed on both an absolute scale, independent of the observer, and also on a relative scale, dependent on attributes of the observer. Much research has focused on how individuals respond to either absolute or relative quality in mate choice, but how these dimensions ar...
Article
Full-text available
Research on human attraction frequently makes use of single-modality stimuli such as neutral-expression facial photographs as proxy indicators of an individual's attractiveness. How- ever, we know little about how judgments of these single-modality stimuli correspond to judg- ments of stimuli that incorporate multi-modal cues of face, body and spee...
Article
Approaches to the study of human mate preferences commonly involve judgements of facial photographs and assume that these judgements provide a reasonable reflection of how individuals would be perceived in real encounters. However, three recent studies have each reported non-significant correlations between judgements using photos (static images) a...
Article
It is widely thought in Western societies that facial scarring has a negative impact on attractiveness. However, the specific effects of non-severe facial posttraumatic scarring on third party perceptions of attractiveness are currently unknown. Here we show that non-severe facial scarring can enhance perceptions of attractiveness in men but not in...
Article
Full-text available
Of the many visual characteristics of animals, countershading (darker pigmentation on those surfaces exposed to the most lighting) is one of the most common, and paradoxically one of the least well understood. Countershading has been hypothesized to reduce the detectability of prey to visually hunting predators, and while the function of a counters...
Article
Full-text available
Perception of the body's outline and three-dimensional shape arises from visual cues such as shading, contour, perspective and texture. When a uniformly coloured prey animal is illuminated from above by sunlight, a shadow may be cast on the body, generating a brightness contrast between the dorsal and ventral surfaces. For animals such as caterpill...
Article
Of the many traits seen in cryptic prey animals, countershading (darker pigmentation on those surfaces exposed to the most lighting) is one of the commonest, and paradoxically one of the least understood. Countershading has been hypothesized to enhance crypsis by shadow-obliteration, in which lighter coloration on the undersides compensates for inc...
Article
Full-text available
In the first clear mathematical treatment of natural selection, Müller proposed that a shared warning signal (mimicry) would benefit defended prey species by sharing out the per capita mortality incurred during predator education. Although mimicry is a mainstay of adaptationist thinking, there has been repeated debate on whether there is a mutualis...

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Project (1)
Project
This project investigates how social information influence foraging strategies of birds and how and why different species and individuals use social information differently.