Hannah Roome

Hannah Roome
University of Texas at Austin | UT · Center for Learning and Memory

PhD

About

16
Publications
2,342
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215
Citations
Introduction
Broadly, my research focuses on cognitive development. My PhD examined the development of working memory capacity in children. I have also worked on cognitive skills underlying maths in children, and the development of spatial navigation in children. I currently work at UT Austin, in the Preston Lab, Center for Learning and Memory, which uses a combination of brain imaging and behavioural techniques to study memory in children and adults, particularly memory integration and spatial navigation.

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
The development of working memory capacity is considered from the perspective of the active maintenance of items in primary memory (PM) and a cue-dependent search component, secondary memory (SM). Using free recall, plus a more novel serial interleaved items task, age-related increases in PM estimates were evident in both paradigms. In addition to...
Article
Using landmarks and other scene features to recall locations from new viewpoints is a critical skill in spatial cognition. In an immersive virtual reality task, we asked children 3.5 - 4.5 years old to remember the location of a target using various cues. On some trials they could use information from their own self-motion. On some trials they coul...
Conference Paper
We studied how children 8-9 years old respond to simultaneous training of two different perceptual cues. Previous research without training has shown that children at this age will fail to take an appropriate precision-weighted average of an auditory and visual cue (e.g. Gori, Sandini & Burr, 2012). We wanted to know if children at 8-9 years are fu...
Conference Paper
In many perceptual tasks, observers minimise random error by reliability-weighted averaging (e.g. Ernst & Banks, Nature 2002). Late development of this ability in childhood (e.g. Nardini et al, Curr Biol 2008; Dekker et al, Curr Biol 2015) suggests that it requires either considerable experience with specific cues or maturation of the nervous syste...
Article
Full-text available
Social environments that are extremely enriched or adverse can influence hippocampal volume. Though most individuals experience social environments that fall somewhere in between these extremes, substantially less is known about the influence of normative variation in social environments on hippocampal structure. Here, we examined whether hippocamp...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the fact that children can draw on their memories to make novel inferences, it is unknown whether they do so through the same neural mechanisms as adults. We measured memory reinstatement as participants aged 7–30 years learned new, related information. While adults brought memories to mind throughout learning, adolescents did so only trans...
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive development studies how information processing in the brain changes over the course of development. A key part of this question is how information is represented and stored in memory. This study examined allocentric (world-based) spatial memory, an important cognitive tool for planning routes and interacting with the space around us. This...
Article
Full-text available
Schemas capture patterns across multiple experiences, accumulating information about common event structures that guide decision making in new contexts. Schemas are an important principle of leading theories of cognitive development; yet, we know little about how children and adolescents form schemas and use schematic knowledge to guide decisions....
Article
Cue combination occurs when two independent noisy perceptual estimates are merged together as a weighted average, creating a unified estimate that is more precise than either single estimate alone. Surprisingly, this effect has not been demonstrated compellingly in children under the age of 10 years, in contrast with the array of other multisensory...
Preprint
Cue combination occurs when two independent noisy perceptual estimates are merged together as a weighted average, creating a unified estimate that is more precise than either single estimate alone. Surprisingly, this effect has not been demonstrated compellingly in children under the age of 10 years, in contrast with the array of other multisensory...
Article
Full-text available
Measures of working memory capacity (WMC) are extremely popular, yet we know relatively little about the specific processes that support recall. We focused on children's and adults' ability to use contextual support to access working memory representations that might otherwise not be reported. Children ( N = 186, 5-10 years) and adults ( N = 64) co...
Article
Measures of working memory capacity (WMC) are extremely popular, yet we know relatively little about the specific processes that support recall. We focused on children and adults’ ability to use contextual support to access working memory representations that might otherwise not be reported. Children (N=186, five- to 10-years old) and adults’ (N=64...
Article
Spatial memory is an important aspect of adaptive behavior and experience, providing both content and context to the perceptions and memories that we form in everyday life. Young children's abilities in this realm shift from mainly egocentric (self-based) to include allocentric (world-based) codings at around 4 years of age. However, information ab...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial memory is an important aspect of adaptive behavior and experience, providing both content and context to the perceptions and memories that we form in everyday life. Young children’s abilities in this realm shift from mainly egocentric (self-based) to include allocentric (world-based) codings around four years. However, information about the...
Article
Full-text available
Achievement in mathematics is predicted by an individual's domain-specific factual knowledge, procedural skill and conceptual understanding as well as domain-general executive function skills. In this study we investigated the extent to which executive function skills contribute to these three components of mathematical knowledge, whether this medi...

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