Hannah Earley

Hannah Earley
University of Cambridge | Cam · Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

9
Publications
171
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
0
Citations
Introduction
I'm a researcher working on forms of unconventional computing, using a mix of physics and computer science. My particular interests are in reversible and molecular computing.
Education
October 2016 - March 2021
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Mathematics
October 2013 - June 2016
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Natural Sciences

Publications

Publications (9)
Preprint
Full-text available
We analyse the maximum achievable rate of sustained computation for a given convex region of three dimensional space subject to geometric constraints on power delivery and heat dissipation. We find a universal upper bound across both quantum and classical systems, scaling as $\sqrt{AV}$ where $V$ is the region volume and $A$ its area. Attaining thi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Conventional computing has many sources of heat dissipation, but one of these--the Landauer limit--poses a fundamental lower bound of 1 bit of entropy per bit erased. 'Reversible Computing' avoids this source of dissipation, but is dissipationless computation possible? In this paper, a general proof is given for open quantum systems showing that a...
Preprint
Full-text available
A novel model of reversible computing, the $\aleph$-calculus, is introduced. It is declarative, reversible-Turing complete, and has a local term-rewriting semantics. Unlike previously demonstrated reversible term-rewriting systems, it does not require the accumulation of history data. Terms in the $\aleph$-calculus, in combination with the program...
Chapter
Full-text available
A novel model of reversible computing, the ℵ-calculus, is introduced. It is declarative, reversible-Turing complete, and has a local term-rewriting semantics. Unlike previously demonstrated reversible term-rewriting systems, it does not require the accumulation of history data. Terms in the ℵ-calculus, in combination with the program definitions, e...
Thesis
Full-text available
If the 20th century was known for the computational revolution, what will the 21st be known for? Perhaps the recent strides in the nascent fields of molecular programming and biological computation will help bring about the ‘Coming Era of Nanotechnology’ promised in Drexler’s ‘Engines of Creation’. Though there is still far to go, there is much rea...
Preprint
Full-text available
If the 20th century was known for the computational revolution, what will the 21st be known for? Perhaps the recent strides in the nascent fields of molecular programming and biological computation will help bring about the 'Coming Era of Nanotechnology' promised in Drexler's 'Engines of Creation'. Though there is still far to go, there is much rea...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper concludes a three-Part series on the limits the laws of physics place on the sustained performance of reversible computers. Part I concerned aggregate performance in terms of computational operations per unit time, but neglected to consider interactions among computational sub-units or between computational sub-units and shared resources...
Preprint
Full-text available
Motivated by a need for a model of reversible computation appropriate for a Brownian molecular architecture, the א calculus is introduced. This novel model is declarative, concurrent, and term-based—encapsulating all information about the program data and state within a single structure in order to obviate the need for a von Neumann-style discrete...
Preprint
Full-text available
In Part I of this series, the limits on the sustained performance of large reversible computers were investigated and found to scale as $\sqrt{AV}$ where $A$ is the convex bounding surface area of the system and $V$ its internal volume, compared to $A$ for an irreversible computer. This analysis neglected to consider interactions between components...