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Hannah Bannister

Hannah Bannister
South Coast Natural Resource Management

PhD in Science

About

9
Publications
818
Reads
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64
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - April 2020
South Coast Natural Resource Management Inc.
Position
  • Regional Ecologist
July 2017 - April 2020
The University of New South Wales
Position
  • Lecturer
February 2015 - July 2019
University of Adelaide
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
July 2013 - June 2014
University of Western Australia
Field of study
  • Zoology; Conservation Biology

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Conservation practitioners implement management interventions for the protection of threatened species, but the benefits are rarely measured. We investigated the efficacy of aerial poison baiting for feral cats, a species identified as a threat to reintroduced populations of two Australian mammals. We measured individual survival, short‐term change...
Article
Full-text available
Successful fauna reintroductions occur when the original causes of decline are addressed. When these causes are unclear, intensive post-release monitoring could help identify unknown threats and new management actions. We present an Australian case study involving a reintroduction of the threatened western quoll (Dasyurus geoffroii), a species whos...
Article
Full-text available
Predation is a key factor contributing to the failure of reintroductions of vertebrates but there is variation in predation risk between individuals. Understanding the traits that render some animals less susceptible to predation, and selecting for these traits, may help improve reintroduction success. Here, we test whether prior exposure to predat...
Article
An important component of reintroduction is acclimatization to the release site. Movement parameters and breeding are common metrics used to infer the end of the acclimatization period, but the time taken to locate preferred food items is another important measure. We studied the diet of a reintroduced population of brushtail possums Trichosurus vu...
Article
Habitat degradation contributes to species decline, and habitat quality is an important factor influencing reintroduction success globally. Habitat quality can include a range of physical resources such as nest sites and food resources but also anything that can restrict the use of these resources such as predation risk or competition. In arid Aust...
Article
Natal dispersal is influenced by many environmental and biological factors and can be a time of elevated mortality risk. We aimed to understand how physical, behavioral, and demographic traits of mothers and juveniles influenced natal dispersal by studying a population of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) reintroduced to their former range....
Article
Context: Predator-controlled environments can lead to prey species losing costly antipredator behaviours as they exploit their low-risk environment, creating a ‘predator-naïve’ population. If individuals lacking suitable antipredator behaviours are used as source populations for reintroductions to environments where predators are present, their beh...
Article
Release methods can influence the outcome of reintroductions. We tested the effect of delayed, immediate and supplementary food/shelter release treatments on the reintroduction of brushtail possums Trichosurus vulpecula to an environment in which introduced predators, particularly foxes, were subject to control. Monitoring of 48 radio-collared poss...
Article
Broad-scale Australian mammal declines following European settlement have resulted in many species becoming regionally or globally extinct. Attempts to reintroduce native mammals are often unsuccessful due to a suboptimal number of founders being used, high rates of predation and a lack of knowledge of the reintroduction biology for the species con...

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