Han (A.J.) Dolman

Han (A.J.) Dolman
NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research | NIOZ · GES (TX and YE) – General Support

Prof. dr.

About

579
Publications
120,747
Reads
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39,005
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - March 2017
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor
January 2004 - December 2012
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Publications

Publications (579)
Preprint
Peatlands are the world’s largest terrestrial carbon store. Despite covering only 3 % of the planet’s land surface, peatlands store 30 % of the planet’s terrestrially available carbon. The Dutch government's 2019 National Climate Agreement committed to reduce the contribution of peatlands to total national Dutch greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, by 1...
Article
Less than half of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere to drive climate change. The rest is being removed by mysterious processes in the land, biosphere, and ocean.
Article
Full-text available
Fossil fuel combustion, land use change and other human activities have increased the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) abundance by about 50% since the beginning of the industrial age. The atmospheric CO2 growth rates would have been much larger if natural sinks in the land biosphere and ocean had not removed over half of this anthropogenic CO2. As...
Article
Full-text available
The greening of the Earth over the last decades is predominantly indicated by the enhancements of leaf area index (LAI). Quantifying the relative contribution of multiple determinants, especially changes in climate and in land management changes (LMC), remains an arduous challenge. To solve this problem, we develop a simple yet novel data‐driven me...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and human activities have significant impacts on terrestrial vegetation. Syria is a typical arid region with a water-limited ecosystem and has experienced severe social unrest over the last decades. In this study, changes in vegetation and potential drivers in Syria are investigated. By using an enhanced vegetation index (EVI), a gen...
Article
Past efforts to synthesize and quantify the magnitude and change in carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems across the rapidly warming Arctic–boreal zone (ABZ) have provided valuable information but were limited in their geographical and temporal coverage. Furthermore, these efforts have been based on data aggregated over varying time...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change affects the water cycle. Despite the improved accuracy of simulations of historical temperature, precipitation and runoff in the latest Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6), the uncertainty of the future sensitivity of global runoff to temperature remains large. Here, we identify a statistical relationship at the glo...
Article
Full-text available
More than half of the solar energy absorbed by land surfaces is currently used to evaporate water 1. Climate change is expected to intensify the hydrological cycle 2 and to alter evapotranspiration, with implications for ecosystem services and feedback to regional and global climate. Evapotranspiration changes may already be under way, but direct o...
Article
Time series of wetland methane fluxes measured by eddy covariance require gap-filling to estimate daily, seasonal , and annual emissions. Gap-filling methane fluxes is challenging because of high variability and complex responses to multiple drivers. To date, there is no widely established gap-filling standard for wetland methane fluxes, with regar...
Article
Northern latitude peatlands act as important carbon sources and sinks, but little is known about the greenhouse gas (GHG) budgets of peatlands that were submerged beneath the North Sea during the last glacial–interglacial transition. We found that whilst peat formation was diachronous, commencing between 13 680 and 8360 calibrated years before the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Arctic warming is affecting snow cover and soil hydrology, with consequences for carbon sequestration in tundra ecosystems. The scarcity of observations in the Arctic has limited our understanding of the impact of covarying environmental drivers on the carbon balance of tundra ecosystems. In this study, we address some of these uncertainties throug...
Article
Full-text available
Northern peatlands store large amounts of carbon. Observations indicate that forests and peatlands in northern biomes can be alternative stable states for a range of landscape settings. Climatic and hydrological changes may reduce the resilience of peatlands and forests, induce persistent shifts between these states, and release the carbon stored i...
Article
Full-text available
Ice-ridge Yedoma terrain is susceptible to vertical surface displacements by thaw and refreeze of ground ice, and geomorphological processes of mass wasting, erosion and sedimentation. Here we explore the relation between a 3 year data set of InSAR measurements of vertical surface displacements during the thaw season, and geomorphological features...
Article
Full-text available
Large amounts of carbon flow through tropical ecosystems every year, from which a part is sequestered in biomass through tree growth. However, the effects of ongoing warming and drying on tree growth and carbon sequestration in tropical forest is still highly uncertain. Field observations are sparse and limited to a few sites, while remote sensing...
Article
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) emissions from natural landscapes constitute roughly half of global CH4 contributions to the atmosphere, yet large uncertainties remain in the absolute magnitude and the seasonality of emission quantities and drivers. Eddy covariance (EC) measurements of CH4 flux are ideal for constraining ecosystem-scale CH4 emissions due to quasi-co...
Preprint
Full-text available
Past efforts to synthesize and quantify the magnitude and change in carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems across the rapidly warming Arctic-Boreal Zone (ABZ) have provided valuable information, but were limited in their geographical and temporal coverage. Furthermore, these efforts have been based on data aggregated over varying tim...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change and human activities have significant impacts on terrestrial vegetation. Syria is a typical arid region with a water-limited ecosystem and has experienced severe social unrest over the last decades. In this study, changes in vegetation and potential drivers in Syria are investigated. By using an enhanced vegetation index (EVI), a gen...
Article
Full-text available
Reliable quantification of the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, together with trends and uncertainties, is essential to monitoring the progress in mitigating anthropogenic emissions under the Paris Agreement. This study provides a consolidated synthesis of CH4 and N2O emissions with consistently derived state-of-the-art bottom-up (BU) and top...
Article
Full-text available
p>Reliable quantification of the sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), including that of their trends and uncertainties, is essential to monitoring the progress in mitigating anthropogenic emissions under the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement. This study provides a consolidated synthesis of estimates for all anthropogenic and...
Article
Full-text available
Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission inventories represent the link between national and international political actions on climate change, and climate and environmental sciences. Inventory agencies need to include, in national GHG inventories, emission and removal estimates based on scientific data following specific reporting guidance under the United N...
Article
The regional variability in tundra and boreal carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes can be high, complicating efforts to quantify sink‐source patterns across the entire region. Statistical models are increasingly used to predict (i.e., upscale) CO2 fluxes across large spatial domains, but the reliability of different modeling techniques, each with different...
Article
Full-text available
Thermokarst lakes play an important role in per-mafrost environments by warming and insulating the underlying permafrost. As a result, thaw bulbs of unfrozen ground (taliks) are formed. Since these taliks remain perennially thawed, they are zones of increased degradation where microbial activity and geochemical processes can lead to increased green...
Article
Full-text available
p>The following authors were omitted from the original version of this Data Descriptor: Markus Reichstein and Nicolas Vuichard. Both contributed to the code development and N. Vuichard contributed to the processing of the ERA-Interim data downscaling. Furthermore, the contribution of the co-author Frank Tiedemann was re-evaluated relative to the co...
Preprint
Full-text available
Large amounts of carbon flow through tropical ecosystems every year, from which a part is sequestered in biomass through tree growth. However, the effects of ongoing warming and drying on tree growth and carbon sequestration in tropical forest is still highly uncertain. Field observations are sparse and limited to a few sites while remote sensing a...
Article
Full-text available
The complete or partial collapse of the forests of Amazonia is consistently named as one of the top ten possible tipping points of Planet Earth in a changing climate. However, apart from a few observational studies that showed increased mortality after the severe droughts of 2005 and 2010, the evidence for such collapse depends primarily on modelli...
Article
Evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the most important variables in terrestrial ecosystems, linking the carbon-water-energy cycles. In this study, we first analyze the spatial patterns of annual ET changes during 1980-2010 across China using four ET products: (i) the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model version 3.0a (GLEAMv3.0), (ii) the EartH2Obs...
Preprint
Full-text available
Methane (CH4) emissions from natural landscapes constitute roughly half of global CH4 contributions to the atmosphere, yet large uncertainties remain in the absolute magnitude and the seasonality of emission quantities and drivers. Eddy covariance (EC) measurements of CH4 flux are ideal for constraining ecosystem-scale CH4 emissions, including thei...
Preprint
Full-text available
Reliable quantification of the sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), including that of their trends and uncertainties, is essential to monitoring the progress in mitigating anthropogenic emissions under the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement. This study provides a consolidated synthesis of estimates for all anthropogenic and na...
Article
Full-text available
Reliable quantification of the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, together with trends and uncertainties, is essential to monitoring the progress in mitigating anthropogenic emissions under the Paris Agreement. This study provides a consolidated synthesis of CH4 and N2O emissions with consistently derived state-of-the-art bottom-up (BU) and top...
Preprint
Full-text available
Thermokarst lakes play an important role in permafrost environments by warming up and insulating the underlying permafrost. As a result, thaw bulbs of unfrozen ground (taliks) are formed. Since these taliks remain perennially thawed, they are zones of increased degradation where microbial activity and geochemical processes can lead to increased gre...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Inland waters are an ubiquitous feature of Arctic landscapes, with carbon (C) and nutrient cycles that are closely coupled to terrestrial processes. They act as important conduits of terrestrial matter by not only transporting but also actively storing and processing it, subsequently emitting greenhouse gases (GHG) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane...
Preprint
Full-text available
Northern latitude peatlands act as important carbon sources and sinks but little is known about the greenhouse gas (GHG) budget of peatlands submerged beneath the North Sea during the last glacial-interglacial transition. We found that whilst peat formation was diachronous, commencing between 13,680 and 8,360 calibrated years before the present, st...
Article
Full-text available
Evaporation is the phenomenon by which a substance is converted from its liquid into its vapor phase, independently of where it lies in nature. However, language is alive, and just like regular speech, scientific terminology changes. Frequently, those changes are grounded on a solid rationale, but sometimes these semantic transitions have a fragile...
Article
Full-text available
Methane emissions from natural wetlands tend to increase with temperature and therefore may lead to a positive feedback under future climate change. However, their temperature response includes confounding factors and appears to differ on different time scales. Observed methane emissions depend strongly on temperature on a seasonal basis, but if th...
Presentation
Full-text available
Economic development and rapid urbanization have increased the consumption of fossil fuel in megacities degrading the local air quality. Burning efficiency is a major factor determining the impact of fuel burning on the environment. It varies with environmental conditions and influences the ratio at which pollutants are emitted, as expressed by the...
Article
Full-text available
The Sahel, a semi-arid climatic zone with highly seasonal and erratic rainfall, experienced severe droughts in the 1970s and 1980s. Based on remote sensing vegetation indices since early 1980, a clear greening trend is found, which can be attributed to the recovery of contemporaneous precipitation. Here, we present an analysis using long-term leaf...
Article
Full-text available
The FLUXNET2015 dataset provides ecosystem-scale data on CO2, water, and energy exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere, and other meteorological and biological measurements, from 212 sites around the globe (over 1500 site-years, up to and including year 2014). These sites, independently managed and operated, voluntarily contributed their...
Article
Full-text available
The FLUXNET2015 dataset provides ecosystem-scale data on CO2, water, and energy exchange between the biosphere and the atmosphere, and other meteorological and biological measurements, from 212 sites around the globe (over 1500 site-years, up to and including year 2014). These sites, independently managed and operated, voluntarily contributed their...
Article
Full-text available
Resolving regional carbon budgets is critical for informing land-based mitigation policy. For nine regions covering nearly the whole globe, we collected inventory estimates of carbon-stock changes complemented by satellite estimates of biomass changes where inventory data are missing. The net land–atmospheric carbon exchange (NEE) was calculated by...
Preprint
Evaporation is the phenomenon by which a substance is converted from its liquid into its vapor phase, independently of where it lies in nature. However, language is alive, and just like regular speech, scientific terminology changes. Frequently those changes are grounded on a solid rationale; but sometimes these semantic transitions have a fragile...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of future warming and drying on tropical forest functioning remain largely unresolved. Here, we conduct a meta-analysis of observed drought responses in Neotropical humid forests, focusing on carbon and water exchange. Measures of leaf-, tree- and ecosystem-scale performance were retrieved from 145 published studies conducted across 232...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Inland waters can be significant sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs; CO 2 , CH 4 and N 2 O) to the atmosphere, yet they are often excluded from terrestrial GHG balances. Vast stocks of carbon stored in Arctic tundra permafrost soils are vulnerable to mobilisation due to permafrost thawing accelerated by the amplified effects of climate warming at hi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Inland waters (rivers, lakes and ponds) are important conduits for the emission of terrestrial carbon in Arctic permafrost landscapes. These emissions are driven by turnover of contemporary terrestrial carbon and additional "pre-aged" (Holocene and late-Pleistocene) carbon released from thawing permafrost soils, but the magnitude of these source co...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Large quantities of carbon are stored in the terrestrial permafrost of the Arctic region where the rate of climate warming is two to three times more than the global mean and the largest temperature anomalies observed in autumn and winter. The quantification of the impact of climate warming on the degradation of permafrost and the associated potent...
Article
Full-text available
Emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and removals from land, including both anthropogenic and natural fluxes, require reliable quantification, including estimates of uncertainties, to support credible mitigation action under the Paris Agreement. This study provides a state-of-the-art scientific overview of bottom-up anthropogenic emissions data from...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
Inland waters (rivers, lakes and ponds) are important conduits for the emission of terrestrial carbon in Arctic permafrost landscapes. These emissions are driven by turnover of contemporary terrestrial carbon and additional pre-aged (Holocene and late-Pleistocene) carbon released from thawing permafrost soils, but the magnitude of these source cont...
Article
Full-text available
The semi-arid and arid drylands of China, which are located in the inland region of Eurasia, have experienced rapid climate change. Some regions in particular, have shown upward trends in the observational records of precipitation. However, there is more to drying and wetting than just changes in precipitation which still have large uncertainties....
Article
Full-text available
Under the Paris Agreement progress of emission reduction efforts is tracked on the basis of regular updates to national Greenhouse Gas (GHG) inventories, referred to as bottom-up estimates. However, only top-down atmospheric measurements can provide observation-based evidence of emission trends. Today there is no internationally agreed, operational...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. The effects of future warming and drying on tropical forest functioning remain largely unresolved. Here, we conduct a meta-analysis of observed drought responses in neotropical humid forests, focused on carbon and water exchange. Measures of leaf, tree and ecosystem scale performance were retrieved from 138 published studies conducted acr...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study investigates the use of co-located NO2 and CO retrievals from the TROPOMI satellite to improve the quantification of burning efficiency and emission factors over the mega-cities of Tehran, Mexico City, Cairo, Riyadh, Lahore and Los Angeles. Local enhancement of CO and NO2 above megacities are well captured by TROPOMI at relatively short...