Hamish A. Campbell

Hamish A. Campbell
Charles Darwin University | CDU · School of Environment

B.Sc., Ph.D.

About

122
Publications
29,199
Reads
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2,233
Citations
Introduction
I lead The Movement and Landscape Ecology Lab, based at the Research Institute for the Environment & Livelihoods at Charles Darwin University, Darwin Australia. Our research is concerned with the study of animal movement, how they interact with the landscape, and respond to environmental heterogeneity. We experiment with a range of telemetry technologies, and develop cyber infrastructure to advance the application of animal movement data into ecosystem science and management.
Additional affiliations
February 2016 - present
Charles Darwin University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2014 - January 2016
University of New England (Australia)
Position
  • Lecturer
April 2007 - October 2013
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (122)
Article
Full-text available
Negative interactions between waterbirds and people are increasing. Waterbirds feeding on agricultural crops cause significant losses to farmers worldwide, but so far most research to address these conflicts has been conducted on migratory species in the temperate northern hemisphere. We investigated the space use and habitat selection of the magpi...
Article
Full-text available
Aerial counts are the primary means of monitoring waterbird populations. A valid population assessment requires a significant proportion of the population to be surveyed. For broad‐ranging species, this requires costly reconnaissance flights and surveys over large areas of potential habitat. Here, we assess whether free, autonomously collected weat...
Article
Ecological niche theory dictates that sympatric species cannot occupy the same ecological niche at the same time. Sympatric granivorous finch species in tropical savannas appear to contradict this theory by moving in mixed‐species flocks and feeding together upon the same resources. Here, we explored this contradiction by tracking individuals from...
Article
Supporting the recovery of large carnivores is a popular yet challenging endeavour. Estuarine crocodiles in Australia are a large carnivore conservation success story, with the population having extensively recovered from past heavy exploitation. Here, we explored if dietary changes had accompanied this large population recovery by comparing the is...
Article
Full-text available
Accessing the world's oceans is essential for monitoring and sustainable management of the maritime domain. Difficulty in reaching remote locations has resulted in sparse coverage, undermining our capacity to deter illegal activities and gather data for physical and biological processes. Uncrewed Surface Vessels (USVs) have existed for over two dec...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Information on site utilisation and movement is essential for managing species' resource requirements. Collecting these data requires frequent location sampling of multiple individuals, which can be challenging for small-bodied animals due to the often-large size of animal-borne satellite-based telemetry devices. We show how coded VHF-ra...
Article
Examining the social behaviors of solitary species can be challenging due to the rarity in which interactions occur and the large and often inaccessible areas which these animals inhabit. As shared space-use is a prerequisite for the expression of social behaviors, we can gain insights into the social environments of solitary species by examining t...
Article
Full-text available
There is a growing need for water managers to refine and optimise environmental flow strategies (e-flows) to balance water requirements for humans and nature. With increasing demands for freshwater and consequent declines in biodiversity, managers are faced with the problem of how to adaptively manage e-flows for multiple stakeholders and species w...
Article
Delineation of population structure (i.e. stocks) is crucial to successfully manage exploited species and to address conservation concerns for threatened species. Fish migration and associated movements are key mechanisms through which discrete populations mix and are thus important determinants of population structure. Detailed information on fish...
Article
Waterbirds commonly undertake extensive movements in search of resources. While much is known about waterbird movements within temperate regions where resource distribution is seasonally predictable, less is understood about waterbird movements in tropical and subtropical environments where the temporal distribution of resource is less predictable....
Article
ContextUnderstanding what constitutes high-quality habitat for threatened species is critical for conservation management planning. The endangered northern quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus) has experienced an uneven range contraction among habitat types. Once common across multiple habitats of northern mainland Australia, declining populations have now c...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic derived environmental change is challenging earth’s biodiversity. To implement effective management, it is imperative to understand how organisms are responding over broad spatiotemporal scales. Collection of these data is generally beyond the budget of individual researchers and the integration and sharing of ecological data and asso...
Article
A common strategy used to conserve turtles is to increase the number of hatchlings entering the population by protecting the nests. Typically, nest protection programs require regular and systematic abundance surveys conducted over lengthy periods between oviposition and sexual maturity (20+ years) to assess if this conservation strategy is effecti...
Data
Using depth sensor transmitters and an array of acoustic receivers to monitor the facultative air-breathing Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri), we investigated habitat preferences and behavioral responses to seasonal hypoxic zones in a riverine impoundment. Threedimensional (3-D) kernel utilisation distribution (KUD) models revealed that d...
Article
A common strategy used to conserve turtles is to increase the number of hatchlings entering the population by protecting the nests. Typically, nest protection programs require regular and systematic abundance surveys conducted over lengthy periods between oviposition and sexual maturity (20+ years) to assess if this conservation strategy is effecti...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical rivers and estuaries are highly dynamic environments, where environmental conditions change dramatically over spatial and temporal scales. This creates both physiological and ecological challenges for euryhaline elasmobranchs, where fluctuations in salinity can impact not only osmoregulatory function, but also the ability to find and acqui...
Article
Full-text available
ZoaTrack.org is a web application for visualising and analysing animal biotelemetry data. This online facility offers a robust set of free and highly accessible tools, which enables the non-specialist and specialist to better manage, store, visualise and analyse animal location data. The majority of the data stored in the facility has been collecte...
Article
Full-text available
Technologies for remotely observing animal movements have advanced rapidly in the past decade. In recent years, Australia has invested in an Integrated Marine Ocean Tracking (IMOS) system, a land ecosystem observatory (TERN), and an Australian Acoustic Observatory (A2O), but has not established movement tracking systems for individual terrestrial a...
Article
Operational weather surveillance radars (WSRs) are permanent radars that constantly detect precipitation at regular intervals (approx. every 4–10 min) for the purpose of weather reporting and are often part of a larger network of radars. Ecological studies using WSR to detect flying animals within the airspace have been on the rise since the early...
Article
Full-text available
The optimal design of reserve networks and fisheries closures depends upon species occurrence information and knowledge of how anthropogenic impacts interact with the species concerned. However, challenges in surveying mobile and cryptic species over adequate spatial and temporal scales can mask the importance of particular habitats, leading to unc...
Article
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Body size and age are crucial factors influencing reproductive capacity and success. As females grow, their reproductive investment and success often increase due to improved overall physiological condition and experience gained through successive reproductive events. While much of this work has been conducted on birds and mammals, surprisingly lit...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the significance of a river reach to a particular species is critical for informing riverine restoration and management. Generally, the relative significance of a river reach for freshwater turtles is based upon population counts. However, capture rates can be greatly influenced by the methods employed, species behavior, localized in-...
Article
Full-text available
Background Over the past 15 years, the integration of localised passive telemetry networks into centralised data repositories has greatly enhanced our ability to monitor the presence and movements of highly mobile and migratory species. These large-scale networks are now generating big data, allowing meta-analyses across multiple species, locations...
Article
Full-text available
A request for raw data from the corresponding authors of 771 animal biotelemetry-focused manuscripts, published between 1995 and 2015, highlighted a difference in data sharing practices across researcher career levels. Responses were positive in only 11% of requests made to corresponding authors (CAs) that were senior researchers, while 72% of resp...
Article
Full-text available
Acoustic telemetry is a principle tool for observing aquatic animals, but coverage over large spatial scales remains a challenge. To resolve this, Australia has implemented the Integrated Marine Observing System's Animal Tracking Facility which comprises a continental-scale hydrophone array and coordinated data repository. This national acoustic ne...
Article
Full-text available
Our ability to predict species responses to environmental changes relies on accurate records of animal movement patterns. Continental-scale acoustic telemetry networks are increasingly being established worldwide, producing large volumes of information-rich geospatial data. During the last decade, the Integrated Marine Observing System’s Animal Tra...
Article
Full-text available
Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) play a key role in biodiversity conservation. The majority of these organisations rely on public donations to fund their activities, and therefore fundraising success is a determinant of conservation outcomes. In spite of this integral relationship, the key principals for fundraising success in conservation are...
Data
The familiarity of species used by the Australian Geographic Society as flagships for their fundraising campaigns, measured as percent of respondents who recognise a given species. For the projects were more than one species or life stage was represented in the marketing materials, a mean of the percentage of respondents familiar with both relevant...
Data
The appeal of species used by the Australian Geographic Society as flagships for their fundraising campaigns, measured as mean rank across respondents. Lowest rank indicates higher appeal. For the projects were more than one species or life stage was represented in the marketing materials, a mean of appeal mean rank for both relevant photos was use...
Data
Model selection to investigate the importance of flagship characteristics on individual donor behaviour at ΔAICc < 4. (DOCX)
Data
Model selection to investigate the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of customers in the area surrounding a Australian Geographic Society shop at ΔAICc < 4. (DOCX)
Data
Gantt chart illustrating in black the timeline of the fundraising campaigns by the Australian Geographic Society included in this study. Red bars indicate shorter ad hoc emergency fundraisers, those that were organized in response to unforeseen natural disasters. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Euryhaline and freshwater elasmobranchs are considered amongst the most threatened groups of aquatic animals. The speartooth shark Glyphis glyphis has a distribution restricted to estuaries and rivers in northern Australia and Papua New Guinea. Due to this restricted range and threats from fisheries and habitat degradation, the species is currently...
Article
Full-text available
The effective conservation and management of threatened species requires comprehensive knowledge about resource utilisation. Here we integrated tissue stable isotope analysis and biotelemetry to identify the predominant dietary resources of two sympatric species of freshwater turtle, and locate where those items were acquired. We deployed an array...
Article
Full-text available
Facultative air-breathing fish can persist in hypoxic waters due to their capacity to acquire atmospheric oxygen. Most studies examining responses of air-breathing fish to aquatic hypoxia have occurred under experimental conditions. How air-breathing fish respond to hypoxic conditions in the field has received less attention. Using depth sensor tra...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, there has been significant investment in collaborative e-infrastructures to support biotelemetry research. Whilst these e-infrastructures are rapidly growing in size and sophistication, the current lack of standards for reporting and documenting the data collected by animal-borne telemetry devices is hampering their effectiveness....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The IUCN strongly advocates in-situ nest protection as an approach to improve recruitment for marine and freshwater turtles. Recruitment has long been considered a major threat for the endangered Mary River turtle (Elusor macrurus), with estimates of a 95% decline in the nesting population since the 1970’s due to egg harvesting for the pet trade. I...
Conference Paper
The IUCN strongly advocates in-situ nest protection as an approach to improve recruitment for marine and freshwater turtles. Recruitment has long been considered a major threat for the endangered Mary River turtle (Elusor macrurus). Estimates are of a 95% decline in the nesting population since the 1970’s. For the past 14 years, an in-situ nest pro...
Article
Full-text available
Animal-borne telemetry has revolutionised our ability to study animal movement, species physiology, demography and social structures, changing environments and the threats that animals are experiencing. While there will always be a need for basic ecological research and discovery, the current conservation crisis demands we look more pragmatically a...
Article
Full-text available
Polar fishes are at high risk from increasing seawater temperatures. Characterising the physiological responses to such changes may both clarify mechanisms that permit life under extreme conditions, and identify limitations in the response to continued global warming. We hypothesised that Notothenia coriiceps would show physiological compensation a...
Article
Full-text available
1.Assessing the causal factors underpinning the distribution and abundance of wildlife road-induced mortality can be challenging. This is particularly ubiquitous for rare or elusive species, because traffic strikes occur infrequently for these populations and information about localized abundance, distribution, and movements are generally lacking....
Chapter
Full-text available
The majority of acoustic telemetry studies focus on commercially important temperate and tropical fish, and consequently the movements and ecology of polar fish remain poorly understood. The lack of such studies on polar species in general, and Antarctic fish in particular, is undoubtedly due to logistical constraints imposed by harsh and unpredict...
Article
Full-text available
Preserving large carnivores that perceive humans as prey brings conservation values into direct conflict with human security. Informing when and where humans and large carnivores occupy the same space may reduce attack frequency and promote coexistence. Here, we demonstrate a methodology to better understand the spatiotemporal relationship between...
Article
Full-text available
The estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) is an apex predator across freshwater, estuarine and coastal environments. The impact of a changing C. porosus population upon the ecosystem is unknown, but due to large ontogenetic changes in body mass (>1000-fold) their impact may be wide reaching and substantial. Here we investigated the relationship...
Article
Full-text available
The presence and movements of organisms both reflect and influence the distribution of ecological resources in space and time. The monitoring of animal movement by telemetry devices is being increasingly used to inform management of marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we brought together academics, and environmental managers to det...
Article
Full-text available
Improvements in telemetry technology are allowing us to monitor animal movements with increasing accuracy, precision and frequency. The increased complexity of the data collections, however, demands additional software and programming skills to process, store and disseminate the datasets. Recent focus on data availability has also heightened the ne...
Article
Full-text available
Underwater passive acoustic (PA) telemetry is becoming the preferred technology for investigating animal movement in aquatic systems; however, much of the current statistical tools for telemetry data were established from global positioning system (GPS)-based data. To understand the appropriateness of these tools for PA telemetry, we dual-tagged fr...
Article
Full-text available
Background The southern cassowary (Casuarius casuarius johnsonii) attains 1.8 m in height and over 80 kg in weight. These large birds are equipped with large claws and, although not a direct threat to humans, they have caused serious injury to handlers and members of the public.Methods and resultsThis study describes chemical immobilisation, restra...