Hamid Akın Ünver

Hamid Akın Ünver
Ozyegin University · International Relations

PhD University of Essex

About

45
Publications
19,460
Reads
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171
Citations
Introduction
I currently work at the Department of International Relations, Ozyegin University and serve as a fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Previously, I was a dual non-resident fellow at Oxford University's DPIR and the Alan Turing Institute, London. I'm interested in how greater interdisciplinarity and hybrid research methods improve our understanding of world affairs. Current focus: how technology affects human conflict online and offline.
Additional affiliations
December 2017 - present
University of Oxford
Position
  • Fellow
December 2017 - present
Alan Turing Institute
Position
  • Fellow
January 2017 - September 2017
University of Oxford
Position
  • Fellow
Education
February 2006 - June 2010
University of Essex
Field of study
  • Government

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Do you think R and Python should be taught together in a master's level social data science course, or should the course pick one and focus on it? Let's assume students have some background with Excel and have minimal training in R or Python.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
This is an 'umbrella project' that seeks to explore themes and sub-themes of how digital communication technologies and related research methods influence and impact the field of International Relations. Some of the research streams include the impact of computational methods on conflict and behavioural research related to diplomacy, violence and inter-state competition.
Project
Existing attempts to model civil conflicts, like those in Ukraine and Syria, are not currently reliable as they are often not data driven, or only rely on data provided by the states. The large volumes of open Internet and social media data available has the potential to rethink the way civil wars are modelled. How can we simulate and model civil conflicts in a data-driven way, to understand the dynamics of these events?
Project
This project makes a time-series overview of A.I.-based military adaptation events over the last decade. It provides a typology of 'A.I.-based weaponization' dynamics, policies and tools and gradually constructs a dataset that will be used for future publications. The GAIA dataset will be open to public and academic use once completed.