Gwenaël Rabut

Gwenaël Rabut
Institute of Genetics and Development of Rennes, France

PhD

About

29
Publications
6,664
Reads
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3,419
Citations
Citations since 2016
5 Research Items
1157 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
Introduction
I am a group leader at the Institute of Genetics and Development of Rennes (IGDR, France). We study the function and regulation of protein ubiquitylation and neddylation using budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) as a model system.
Additional affiliations
August 2009 - present
IGDR
Position
  • Project Manager
June 2009 - present
French Institute of Health and Medical Research
Position
  • Researcher
January 2005 - August 2009
ETH Zurich
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
The nuclear envelope is a double membrane that separates the nucleus from the cytoplasm. The inner nuclear membrane (INM) functions in essential nuclear processes including chromatin organization and regulation of gene expression. The outer nuclear membrane is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and is the site of membrane protein synthesis....
Article
Cullin proteins are scaffolds for the assembly of multisubunit ubiquitin ligases, which ubiquitylate a large number of proteins involved in widely varying cellular functions. Multiple mechanisms cooperate to regulate cullin activity, including neddylation of their C-terminal domain. Interestingly, we found that the yeast Cul4-type cullin Rtt101 is...
Article
Full-text available
Neddylation is the post-translational protein modification that is most closely related to ubiquitination. However, ubiquitination is known to regulate a myriad of processes in eukaryotic cells, whereas only a limited number of neddylation substrates have been described to date. Here, we review the principles of protein neddylation and highlight th...
Article
Full-text available
Most cellular activities are executed by multi-protein complexes that form the basic functional modules of their molecular machinery. Proteomic approaches can provide an evermore detailed picture of their composition, but do not reveal how these machines are organized dynamically to accomplish their biological function. Here, we present a method to...
Article
Full-text available
Protein–protein interactions (PPIs) orchestrate nearly all biological processes. They are also considered attractive drug targets for treating many human diseases, including cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. Protein-fragment complementation assays (PCAs) provide a direct and straightforward way to study PPIs in living cells or multicellular...
Article
Ubiquitylation is a reversible post-translational protein modification that regulates a multitude of cellular processes. Detection of ubiquitylated proteins is often challenging, because of their low abundance. Here, we present NUbiCA, a sensitive protein-fragment complementation assay to facilitate the monitoring of ubiquitylation events in cultur...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ubiquitylation is a reversible post-translational protein modification that regulates a multitude of cellular processes. Detection of ubiquitylated proteins is often challenging, because of their low abundance. Here, we present NUbiCA, a sensitive protein-fragment complementation assay to facilitate the monitoring of ubiquitylation events in cultur...
Chapter
Ubiquitylation is a versatile posttranslational protein modification catalyzed through the concerted action of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and ubiquitin ligases (E3s). These enzymes form transient complexes with each other and their modification substrates and determine the nature of the ubiquitin signals attached to their substrates. One c...
Article
Full-text available
Cullin–RING ligases (CRLs) are ubiquitin E3 enzymes with variable substrate-adaptor and -receptor subunits. All CRLs are activated by modification of the cullin subunit with the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 (neddylation). The protein CAND1 (Cullin-associated-Nedd8-dissociated-1) also promotes CRL activity, even though it only interacts with inactiv...
Article
The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was introduced in the mid-1970s to study the diffusion of biomolecules in living cells. For several years, it was used mainly by a small number of biophysicists who had developed their own photobleaching systems. Since the mid-1990s, FRAP has gained increasing popularity because of...
Article
Full-text available
Ubiquitin-binding domains (UBDs) provide specificity to the ubiquitin system, which is also involved in translesion synthesis (TLS) in eukaryotic cells. Upon DNA damage, the UBDs (UBM domains) of polymerase iota (Pol ι) interact with ubiquitinated proliferating cell nuclear antigen to regulate the interchange between processive DNA polymerases and...
Chapter
Full-text available
INTRODUCTION The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was introduced in the mid-1970s to study the diffusion of biomolecules in living cells. For several years, it was used mainly by a small number of biophysicists who had developed their own photobleaching systems. Since the mid-1990s, FRAP has gained increasing popularit...
Article
Full-text available
In budding yeast the cullin Rtt101 promotes replication fork progression through natural pause sites and areas of DNA damage, but its relevant subunits and molecular mechanism remain poorly understood. Here, we show that in budding yeast Mms1 and Mms22 are functional subunits of an Rtt101-based ubiquitin ligase that associates with the conjugating-...
Article
Full-text available
During mitosis in higher eukaryotes, nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) disassemble in prophase and are rebuilt in anaphase and telophase. NPC formation is hypothesized to occur by the interaction of mitotically stable subcomplexes that form defined structural intermediates. To determine the sequence of events that lead to breakdown and reformation of f...
Article
Live cell imaging has become an indispensable technique for cell biologists. However, when grown on coverslip glass used for live cell imaging many cultured cells move even during relatively short observation times and focus can drift as a result of mechanical instabilities and/or temperature fluctuations. Time-lapse imaging therefore requires cons...
Article
Full-text available
In eukaryotes, bidirectional transport of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus occurs through elaborate supramolecular structures embedded in the nuclear envelope, the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). NPCs are composed of multiple copies of approximately 30 different proteins termed nucleoporins, of which several can be biochemically...
Article
In eukaryotic cells, all macromolecules that traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm cross the double nuclear membrane through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). NPCs are elaborate gateways that allow efficient, yet selective, translocation of many different macromolecules. Their protein composition has been elucidated, but how exactly these nucl...
Article
Full-text available
Metazoan NXF1-p15 heterodimers promote the nuclear export of bulk mRNA across nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). In vitro, NXF1-p15 forms a stable complex with the nucleoporin RanBP2/Nup358, a component of the cytoplasmic filaments of the NPC, suggesting a role for this nucleoporin in mRNA export. We show that depletion of RanBP2 from Drosophila cells...
Article
The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) human mu opioid receptor (hMOR) fused to the carboxy-terminus of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) has been successfully and stably expressed in Drosophila Schneider 2 cells under the control of an inducible metallothionein promoter. Polyclonal cells expressing EGFPhMOR display high-affinity, satura...
Article
Full-text available
Breakdown of the nuclear envelope (NE) was analyzed in live starfish oocytes using a size series of fluorescently labeled dextrans, membrane dyes, and GFP-tagged proteins of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and the nuclear lamina. Permeabilization of the nucleus occurred in two sequential phases. In phase I the NE became increasingly permeable for mo...
Article
Full-text available
The nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are evolutionarily conserved assemblies that allow traffic between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In this study, we have identified and characterized a novel human nuclear pore protein, hNup133, through its homology with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleoporin scNup133. Two-hybrid screens and immunoprecipitation e...
Article
How exactly large molecules translocate through nuclear pores has been mysterious for a long time. Recent kinetic measurements of transport rates through the pore have led to a novel translocation model that elegantly combines selectivity with very high transport rates.
Article
Full-text available
Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and N-WASP have emerged as key proteins connecting signalling cascades to actin polymerization. Here we show that the amino-terminal WH1 domain, and not the polyproline-rich region, of N-WASP is responsible for its recruitment to sites of actin polymerization during Cdc42-independent, actin-based motility of...
Article
Full-text available
The CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 mediates fusion and entry of the most commonly transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains. We have isolated six new anti-CCR5 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), designated PA8, PA9, PA10, PA11, PA12, and PA14. A panel of CCR5 alanine point mutants was used to map the epitopes of these MAbs and t...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple extracellular domains of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 are important for its function as a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptor. We have recently demonstrated by alanine scanning mutagenesis that the negatively charged residues in the CCR5 amino-terminal domain are essential for gp120 binding and coreceptor function. We...

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