Guy M. Kirwan

Guy M. Kirwan
Natural History Museum, London · Department of Life Sciences

B.A. History and English

About

3,439
Publications
133,694
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
3,485
Citations
Introduction
My research principally focuses on avian geographic variation using museum specimens, integrated with fieldwork in relevant regions, principally the Middle East and South America. Major projects include work on Brazilian and Cuban birds, and a review of avian mysteries. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6876-9452

Publications

Publications (3,439)
Article
Full-text available
We describe the juvenile plumages of the Cinereous Mourner (Laniocera hypopyrra) and the Brazilian Laniisoma (Laniisoma elegans). Both L. hypopyrra and L. elegans possess a dramatically conspicuous plumage as juveniles in contrast to the generally cryptic plumage pattern exhibited by most juvenile birds. They are predominantly covered by cinnamon-o...
Article
Full-text available
Known with certainty solely from a unique male specimen collected in central Brazil in the first quarter of the 19th century, the Critically Endangered (Possibly Extinct) Hooded Seedeater Sporophila melanops has been one of the great enigmas of Neotropical ornithology, arguably the only one of a host of long-lost species from Brazil to remain obsti...
Article
We examine notions of taxonomic ‘impediment’, ‘gap’, ‘inflation’ and ‘anarchy’, all of which are increasingly prevalent in discussions of the global biodiversity crisis. Following a critical analysis of the history of those notions, we postulate that the entire issue behind them resides in a deep philosophical deficiency in the general comprehensio...
Article
Full-text available
Responding to purported taxonomic anarchy, in an article published in the widely read journal Nature, Garnett & Christidis (2017) [hereafter GC] opined on the need for “standardized global species lists”, at the behest of conservationists, and proposed the construction of a judicial committee to “restrict … freedom of taxonomic action” and promote...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple molecular phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that two Neotropical raptors, tiny hawk Accipiter superciliosus and its sister species semicollared hawk A. collaris, are not closely related to core Accipiter, and that A. superciliosus, at least, possesses osteological characters not replicated in the remainder of the genus. Based on these...
Article
Full-text available
The taxonomic affinity of the near-flightless Zapata Rail Cyanolimnas cerverai, a critically endangered and highly localized species endemic to Cuba, has long been debated. Morphological analyses have suggested that this species, which constitutes a monotypic genus, could be related either to the extinct Tahitian Cave Rails (Nesotrochis sp.) or to...