Guillermo Bueno

Guillermo Bueno
University of Tartu · Department of Botany

Ecology - PhD
Plant Ecology, biotic interactions, mycorrhizal symbiosis, herbivory, soil microbes, functional traits, biogeography

About

97
Publications
30,735
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,391
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in how biotic interactions (especially plant-animal, plant-plant and plant-fungi) can shape plant communities at different scales in relation to environmental gradients. My research involves many approaches aimed at understanding the ecological consequences of global changes and disturbances. My latter focus is on plant mycorrhizal traits, trying to understand their distribution at large spatial scales, as well as their role in plant communities and ecosystems.
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - October 2014
University of Alberta
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Analyzing the combined effect of herbivory and climate change on alpine ecosystems
April 2006 - April 2011
Spanish National Research Council - Pyrenean Institute of Ecology
Position
  • PhD
Description
  • Wild boar rooting on alpine grasslands of the Central Pyrenees: a multi-scale approach
April 2004 - April 2006
University of Zaragoza
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • Wild boar impact on grassland landscape of the Spanish Pyrenees, University of Zaragoza
Education
September 2012 - November 2014
University of Alberta
Field of study
  • Graduate Teaching and Learning program (GTL), 75h (25h lectures and 50h supervised teaching practices)
September 2008 - September 2009
National Distance Education University
Field of study
  • Advanced methods in applied statistics
September 2003 - June 2004
Complutense University of Madrid
Field of study
  • Pedagogical Aptitude Course (Education course oriented to teaching in Spanish secondary schools).

Publications

Publications (97)
Article
Full-text available
Aim Non‐native species threaten ecosystems worldwide, but we poorly know why some species invade more. Functional traits, residence time and native range size have been often used as invasion predictors. Here, we advance in the field by linking invasion success to native range parameters derived from dark diversity – a set of species present in the...
Article
Classical theory identifies resource competition as the major structuring force of biotic communities and predicts that: (i) levels of dominance and richness in communities are inversely related, (ii) narrow niches allow dense ‘packing’ in niche space and thus promote diversity, and (iii) dominants are generalists with wide niches, such that locall...
Article
Full-text available
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are a ubiquitous group of plant symbionts, yet processes underlying their global assembly — in particular the roles of dispersal limitation and historical drivers — remain poorly understood. Because earlier studies have reported niche conservatism in AM fungi, we hypothesized that variation in taxonomic community c...
Article
Organisms on our planet form spatially congruent and functionally distinct communities, which at large geographical scales are called “biomes”. Understanding their pattern and function is vital for sustainable use and protection of biodiversity. Current global terrestrial biome classifications are based primarily on climate characteristics and func...
Article
Full-text available
Mycorrhizal symbiosis influences the performance of plant individuals. However, its impact on plant communities is less well understood. We used a database of plant mycorrhizal traits and investigated how community mycorrhization - the prevalence of mycorrhizal symbiosis in plant communities - is related to plant community productivity and diversit...
Article
Full-text available
Drought stress is an alarming constraint to plant growth, development, and productivity worldwide. However, plant-associated bacteria, fungi, and viruses can enhance stress resistance and cope with the negative impacts of drought through the induction of various mechanisms, which involve plant biochemical and physiological changes. These mechanisms...
Article
Full-text available
Background Herbivores modify the structure and function of tundra ecosystems. Understanding their impacts is necessary to assess the responses of these ecosystems to ongoing environmental changes. However, the effects of herbivores on plants and ecosystem structure and function vary across the Arctic. Strong spatial variation in herbivore effects i...
Article
Full-text available
Plant traits determine how individual plants cope with heterogeneous environments. Despite large variability in individual traits, trait coordination and trade-offs1,2 result in some trait combinations being much more widespread than others, as revealed in the global spectrum of plant form and function (GSPFF3) and the root economics space (RES4) f...
Article
Full-text available
Drastic loss in the area and quality of natural and semi‐natural habitats over the last hundred years has placed biodiversity and related ecosystem functions under substantial threat. Restoration of degraded ecosystems is among the main solutions to counteract this trend. However, past restoration efforts have not always led to the anticipated halt...
Article
Full-text available
Although species with larger body size and slow pace of life have a higher risk of extinction at a global scale, it is unclear whether this global trend will be consistent across biogeographic realms. Here we measure the functional diversity of terrestrial and freshwater vertebrates in the six terrestrial biogeographic realms and predict their futu...
Article
Mycorrhizal symbiosis, comprising functionally distinctive plant‐fungus associations, mediates key plant population and community processes, and ultimately the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems (Tedersoo et al., 2020). It is estimated that about 90% of the world’s vascular flora forms mycorrhizal symbioses with soil fungi (Smith & Read, 2008; B...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding and predicting large-scale ecological responses to global environmental change requires comparative studies across geographic scales with coordinated efforts and standardized methodologies. We designed, applied and assessed standardized protocols to measure tundra herbivory at three spatial scales: plot, site (habitat), and study area...
Article
Full-text available
The influence of mycorrhizal symbiosis on ecosystem processes depends on the mycorrhizal type and status of plants. Early research hypothesized that the proportion of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) species decreases and of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM) species increases along increasing elevations and latitudes. However, there is...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a critical ecological process that modulates gene flow and contributes to the maintenance of genetic and taxonomic diversity within ecosystems. Despite an increasing global understanding of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal diversity, distribution and prevalence in different biomes, we have largely ignored the main dispersal mecha...
Article
Full-text available
The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are a globally‐distributed group of soil organisms that play critical roles in ecosystem function. However, the ecological niches of individual AM fungal taxa are poorly understood. We collected >300 soil samples from natural ecosystems worldwide and modelled the realized niches of AM fungal virtual taxa (VT; a...
Article
Ungulate trampling modifies soils and interlinked ecosystem functions across biomes. Until today, most research has focused on temperate ecosystems and mineral soils while trampling effects on cold and organic matter‐rich tundra soils remain largely unknown. We aimed to develop a general model of trampling effects on soil structure, biota, microcli...
Article
Although many grassland species may exist within agricultural landscapes, some are still absent from individual grassland patches. Understanding which processes limit plant biodiversity within these landscapes is important, and may be better understood if we consider local diversity relative to its species pool size (community completeness). Here w...
Book
Full-text available
This Handbook of methods aim to provide the different techniques and methodologies to obtain a minimum data set of variables, from soil biodiversity assessment to SOM dynamics, including, isotope analysis, bioturbation assessment and metagenomics. With the knowledge gathered in forthcoming projects and studies, researchers (biogeochemists and soil...
Article
Grasslands are among the most threatened terrestrial biomes, and habitat conservation alone will be insufficient to meet biodiversity goals. While restoration of indigenous grasslands is a priority, conflict with economic objectives means that incorporation of alternative habitats is necessary to offset grassland loss. With up to 800,000 km2 of lan...
Chapter
Full-text available
Wild boar is an important species throughout the Iberian Peninsula, and populations exist from sea level to elevations of >2000 m in high mountain environments, which reflects its incredible ability to adapt to a wide range of natural and cultural environments. To summarize the scientific and management knowledge on this species in Portugal and Spa...
Article
The popular dual definition of lichen symbiosis is under question with recent findings of additional microbial partners living within the lichen body. Here we compare the distribution and co‐occurrence patterns of lichen photobiont and recently described secondary fungus (Cyphobasidiales yeast) to evaluate their dependency on lichen host fungus (my...
Article
Benefits of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis for associating plants and fungi are modulated by the functional characteristics of both partners. However, it is unknown to what extent functionally distinct groups of plants naturally associate with different AM fungi. We reanalysed 14 high‐throughput sequencing data sets describing AM fungal...
Article
Full-text available
Although the roles of mycorrhizal fungi in different vegetation types are widely acknowledged, it is still largely unknown how the diversity and frequency of different symbiotic partners vary among plant assemblages globally. We asked (i) how the global distribution of vascular plants correlates with the diversity (i.e. number of species) and frequ...
Article
Full-text available
Mycorrhizal symbiosis has received relatively little attention as a mechanism explaining plant naturalizations at a global scale. Here, we combined data on vascular plant species occurrences in over 840 mainland and island regions from the Global Naturalized Alien Flora (GloNAF) database with up‐to‐date databases of mycorrhizal associations. We tes...
Article
Anthropogenic impact represents a major pressure on ecosystems, yet little is known about how it affects symbiotic relationships, such as mycorrhizal symbiosis, which plays a crucial role in ecosystem functioning. We analyzed the effects of three human impact types – increasing urbanity, introduction of alien plant species (alienness) and modificat...
Chapter
Full-text available
With the application of new molecular analyses to determine soil fungal community composition, and with new macroecological approaches to analyze the biogeographic patterns of mycorrhizal plant species and communities, mycorrhizal ecology has notably advanced. However, this advance has not been balanced between Northern and Southern hemispheres. Wh...
Article
Communities are assembled from species that evolve or colonise a given geographic region, and persist in the face of abiotic conditions and interactions with other species. The evolutionary and colonisation histories of communities are characterised by phylogenetic diversity, while functional diversity is indicative of abiotic and biotic conditions...
Poster
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form a mutualistic relationship with 71% of the known plant species. This relationship called arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), positively and directly influences plants and AMF fitness and have an indirect effect on diversity and community composition of both integrant of the association. The Chilean matorral is a biod...
Poster
Abstract Mycorrhizal symbiosis is a key relationship between most plants and certain groups of soil fungi. This interaction depends on the plant and taxa involved, describing four main plant mycorrhizal types: arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), orchid mycorrhiza (OrM), ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM) and ectomycorrhiza (EcM). Besides, the frequency of occurrenc...
Article
Full-text available
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are highly important for plant communities in dry or seasonally dry ecosystems, such as theSouth American Mediterranean-type ecosystem (MTE), considered a biodiversity hotspot. While AMF hold potential forsustainable MTE management and conservation, they have been under investigated on this ecosystem and little is...
Article
Full-text available
Empirical and taxonomic approaches are the two main methods used to assign plant mycorrhizal traits to species lists. While the empirical approach uses only available empirical information, the taxonomic approach extrapolates certain core information about plant mycorrhizal types and statuses to related species. Despite recent claims that the taxon...
Article
Full-text available
The above mentioned article was originally scheduled for publication in the special issue on Ecology of Tundra Arthropods with guest editors Toke T. Høye . Lauren E. Culler. Erroneously, the article was published in Polar Biology, Volume 40, Issue 11, November, 2017. The publisher sincerely apologizes to the guest editors and the authors for the in...
Article
Full-text available
Chronic, low intensity herbivory by invertebrates, termed background herbivory, has been understudied in tundra, yet its impacts are likely to increase in a warmer Arctic. The magnitude of these changes is however hard to predict as we know little about the drivers of current levels of invertebrate herbivory in tundra. We assessed the intensity of...
Article
Full-text available
Mycorrhizal symbiosis is a widespread association between plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi, which is thought to contribute to plant niche differentiation and expansion. However, this has so far not been explicitly tested. 2.To address the effect of mycorrhizal symbiosis on plants’ realized niches, we addressed how mycorrhizal status (i.e. the freq...
Poster
Full-text available
The mediterranean ecoregion correspond to a small area in the world that supports 20% of the plant species on Earth. At least half of them are endemic and are threatened by agriculture and urbanization. Conservation guidelines consider only the aboveground compartment for their recommendations and the belowground compartment is thought as a black b...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Identifying the factors that drive large-scale patterns of biotic interaction is fundamental for understanding how communities respond to changing environmental conditions. Mycorrhizal symbiosis is a key interaction between fungi and most vascular plants. Whether plants are obligately (OM) or facultatively (FM) mycorrhizal, and which mycorrhiz...
Poster
Full-text available
The priorities of the Herbivory Network (http://herbivory.biology.ualberta.ca) are to integrate study sites, methodologies and metrics used in previous work; to coordinate data collection and ensure meaningful comparisons across studies; to develop new research questions and synthesize knowledge on the role of herbivory in northern and alpine ecosy...
Article
Full-text available
Invasion should decline with species richness, yet the relationship is inconsistent. Species richness, however, is a product of species pool size and biotic filtering. Invasion may increase with richness if large species pools represent weaker environmental filters. Measuring species pool size and the proportion realised locally (completeness) may...
Article
Full-text available
In tundra ecosystems, bryophytes influence soil processes directly and indirectly through interactions with overstory shrub species. We experimentally manipulated moss cover and measured seasonal soil properties and processes under two species of deciduous shrubs with contrasting canopy structures, Salix planifolia pulchra and Betula glandulosa-nan...
Data
Experimental design. In each of 10 experimental sites, four 50 x 50 cm plots were set by pairs under two neighbouring individuals of Betula glandulosa-nana complex and Salix planifolia pulchra, and each plot in a pair was randomly assigned a moss removal/control treatment. Soil temperatures were monitored for the duration of the study using tempera...
Data
Data used in the experiment. The file "Data file S1.xlsx" contains all data used in the analyses of this work. It is divided in 6 data sheets for each of the analyses: "shub_moss" with the information about shrub heights, volume and moss cover per plot; "microhabitat" describes soil moisture (water volumetric content), PAR and moss depths for all p...
Article
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are important root symbionts that enhance plant nutrient uptake and tolerance to pathogens and drought. While the role of plant dispersal in shaping successional vegetation is well studied, there is very little information about the dispersal abilities of AM fungi. We conducted a trap-box experiment in a recently a...
Article
Understanding the forces shaping biodiversity patterns, particularly for groups of organisms with key functional roles, will help predict the responses of ecosystems to environmental changes. Our aim was to evaluate the relative role of different drivers in shaping the diversity patterns of vertebrate herbivores, a group of organisms exerting a str...
Article
Full-text available
Although mycorrhizas are expected to play a key role in community assembly during ecological succession, little is known about the dynamics of the symbiotic partners in natural systems. For instance, it is unclear how efficiently plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi disperse into early successional ecosystems, and which, if either, symbioti...
Article
Full-text available
Plant-herbivore interactions are central to the functioning of tundra ecosystems, but their outcomes vary over space and time. Accurate forecasting of ecosystem responses to ongoing environmental changes requires a better understanding of the processes responsible for this heterogeneity. To effectively address this complexity at a global scale, coo...
Article
Full-text available
Mountain grasslands provide valuable ecosystem services for sustainable development and human wellbeing. These habitats have suffered important changes related with their physiognomic (biomass) and physiologic (greenness) properties. Some of these changes received significant attention i.e. woody encroachment, while others, like the changes in biom...
Article
Full-text available
QuestionsMycorrhizal symbiosis plays a key role in plant communities. Its prevalence in plant communities (mycorrhization) at larger spatial scales has so far been mostly qualitative, while quantitative studies incorporating the mycorrhizal traits of plant species are scarce. This study aims to: (1) determine the variation in general and arbuscular...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Mycorrhizas play a key role in plant community assembly over successional processes, having a complex array of interactions with different plant species. Over time, interactions between plants and mycorrhizal fungi are expected to boost mycorrhizal over non-mycorrhizal plants. As a consequence, mycorrhizal plants will become dominant in the ecosyst...
Poster
Full-text available
We compared the frequency of leaf damage by invertebrates during summer 2014 in plots subjected or not, to long-term passive warming at 6 sites participating in the International Tundra Experiment (ITEX) using a standardized protocol. Presence of leaf damage was assessed at the plant community level using a modified point-intercept method. Herbivor...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Mycorrhizal symbiosis plays a key role in the dynamic and composition of most terrestrial ecosystems, thus influencing plant community assembly and successional processes. Therefore, patterns of plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities may be tightly interrelated. Several hypotheses have been proposed to describe the fluctuations o...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid warming in northern ecosystems is simultaneously influencing plants, herbivores and the interactions among them. Recent studies suggest that herbivory could buffer plant responses to environmental change, but this has only been shown for vertebrate herbivores so far. The role of invertebrate herbivory in tundra ecosystems is often overlooked,...